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Week 2 Resources

Your slides will be posted here the day before the class takes place.

Monday 25/7

10:00-11:00 REFUGEES AND FORCED MIGRATION -Dr Akin Oyawale (SlidesLink opens in a new window)

Overview:

What is (forced) migration? Why do people move? Is migration a security threat? What different ways should we understand specific type of movements and what happens when places of ‘refuge’ become hostile to people who have been displaced from their homes? These are few of the questions that this lecture will seek to address.

Reading List:

Haddad, E., 2003. The refugee in International Society: Between sovereigns. Cambridge. Cambridge University Press. (Read Chapter 2: 'Who is (not) a Refugee?')

Squire, V. ed., 2010. The contested politics of mobility: Borderzones and irregularity. Routledge. (Read Chapter 1 – The contested politics of mobility Politicizing mobility, mobilizing politics).

11:00-12:00 GLOBAL PANDEMICS (HIV/AIDS, EBOLA, COVID-19): CONSEQUENCES, RESPONSES, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT - Prof Franklyn Lisk (SlidesLink opens in a new window)

Overview:

This lecture will highlight how global pandemics such as HIV/AIDS, SARS and Ebola, and of course the current COVID 19 catastrophe, have impacted on regions, countries and societies across the world - from the standpoints of both humanitarian tragedies as well as multidimensional development challenges. It will present different perspectives of the global response to pandemics in terms of North-South power relationships, international and regional partnerships and governance of global health institutions. Example of the tension in global public health system will be illustrated by the Covid-19 crisis which laid bare the inadequacies of the multilateral system to achieve effective collective and coordinated responses within the framework of global cooperation. The unfair case of the manufacture and distribution of the COVID vaccine brings into focus the consequences of decades of inequality in global health financing and security between rich and poor countries.

Reading List:

Lisk, F. 2009. Global institutions and the HIV/AIDS epidemic: Responding to an international crisis. Routledge

Green, T. 2021. The Covid consensus: The new politics if global inequality. London: Hurst Publishers

13:00-14:00 SECURITIZING CLIMATE CHANGE - Dr Akin Oyawale (SlidesLink opens in a new window).

Overview:

This lecture addresses climate change and environmental politics in IR and unpacks the various ways in which climate change has been constructed as a security issue. Is this acceptable? What processes have elites undertaken to accomplish these goals? Is it possible to securitize something like the environment? These are some of the few questions that this lecture will address.

Reading List:

Corry, O. and Stevenson, H., 2017. Traditions and Trends in Global Environmental Politics. Taylor & Francis. (Read Chapter 9 – Security Politics and Climate Change).

Kütting, G. and Herman, K. eds., 2018. Global environmental politics: concepts, theories and case studies. Routledge. (Read Environmental Security).

14:00-15:00 SEMINARS - Dr Eleanya Nduka

Seminar Questions:

  1. What controls, if any, should there be on people’s movement across states?
  2. Who qualifies as a refugee (or: who does not qualify as a refugee)?
  3. To what extent does international inequality in public health resources and outreach programmes contribute to global pandemics?
  1. How justified were the developing countries in describing their experience of the global response to the Covid-19 pandemic as one of ‘vaccine apartheid’?
  2. Why do actors speak about climate change in security terms?
  3. What are the conceptual challenges of climate change for IR theory?

Tuesday 26/7

10:00-11:00 GENDER AND HEALTH: GENDERING HEALTHCARE IN EPIDEMICS AND PANDEMICS - Dr Mouzayian Khalil (SlidesLink opens in a new window)

Overview:

In this lecture we explore the ways in which health-related issues and pandemics are gendered; addressing the economic and social implications of health crises/pandemics for gender and development, we shall assess how gendered inequalities have exacerbated the spread of COVID-19, HIV/AIDS in the developing world; what value does a gendered lens add to the way health crises or pandemics are managed.

Reading List:

Sen, G. & Ostlin, P. (Chapter 9) Gender as a social determinant of health: evidence, policies, and innovations. In: Nalini Visvanathan, L. D., Nan Wiegersma, Laurie Nisonoff (ed.) The Women, Gender and Development Reader. 2nd ed. London and New York: Zed Books (pp.64-73). ReadingLink opens in a new window

Pratt, N. (July 13) 2020. COVID-19 and the crisis of social reproduction in the Middle East and North Africa. Think Development Blog, Warwick Interdisciplinary Research Centre for International Development (WICID): https://blogs.warwick.ac.uk/po901/entry/covid-19_and_the/

11:00-12:00 INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM DR Akin Oyawale (SlidesLink opens in a new window)

Overview:

This lecture will critically address terrorism and violent extremism through engaging with various ways in which a specific genre of political violence has been designated as terrorism and how events at the turn of the 21st century, especially the assassination of Theo van Gogh in Amsterdam and the July 7 attacks in London triggered a reconceptualization of terrorism from external threats involving people who ‘hate us’ to internal threats from ‘homegrown’ terrorists who have been radicalised. The lecture will evaluate various taken for granted claims such as ‘one person’s terrorist is another person’s freedom fighter’, ‘[‘old’] terrorists don’t want many people dead but many people watching’, ‘[new] terrorists want many people dead and many people watching’, etc and will allow students to embed their own ‘terrorism’ stories within the various examples and arguments presented.

 

Reading List:

Jackson, R., Jarvis, L., Gunning, J. and Breen-Smyth, M., 2011. Terrorism: A critical introduction. Macmillan International Higher Education (Read Chapter 1).

Kundnani, A., 2012. Radicalisation: the journey of a concept. Race & class, 54(2), pp.3-25.

13:00-14:00 INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS - Dr Eleanya Nduka (SlidesLink opens in a new window)

Overview:

This lecture will answer questions such: how do international environmental problems differ from national (or sub-national) problems? What additional issues are raised by virtue of an environmental problem being international?

What insights does game theory bring to our understanding of international environmental policy? What determines the degree to which cooperation takes place between countries and policy is coordinated? Put another way, which conditions favour (or discourage) the likelihood and extent of cooperation between countries? Why is cooperation typically a gradual, dynamic process, with agreements often being embodied in treaties or conventions that are general frameworks of agreed principles, but in which subsequent negotiation processes determine the extent to which cooperation is taken?

Is it possible to use such conditions to explain how far efficient cooperation has gone concerning upper-atmosphere ozone depletion and global climate change?

Reading List:

Perman et al. (2011), Natural resource and environmental economics (4th edition), Harlow: Pearson education limited. Part III of Chapter 9.

14:00-15:00 SEMINAR - Dr Eleanya Nduka

Seminar Questions:

  1. What is the ‘Shadow pandemic’ and discuss the implications across the world.
  2. How can a gendered approach to health sector interventions make it possible to manage health crises/pandemics better?
  1. What is humanitarian intervention?
  2. What challenges does humanitarian intervention pose to IR theory?
  3. Can cooperation solve the global environmental problems?
  4. Discuss the main challenges of cooperation.

Wednesday 27/7 free day- no materials

Thursday 28/7

10:00-11:00 GENDER AND THE ENVIRONMENT - Dr Mouzayian Khalil (SlidesLink opens in a new window)

Overview:

Issues of climate change have featured in global affairs for decades, yet little seems to be done. However, the impact of climate change and environmental degradation highlights the inequalities that already exist between the global North and the global South, and as such should be treated as a development issue. In this lecture we examine environmental issues from a gendered perspective, including some theoretical lenses, to reveal huge disparities between men and women in their vulnerability to and capability to cope with and adapt to climactic change. We will examine the effects of climate change and the importance of engendering more sustainable approaches to development.

Reading List:

Momsen, J. 2020. (Chapter 5) Gender and environment. Gender and Development. Third Edition ed. London and New York: Routledge (pp. 120-152) ReadingLink opens in a new window

UN WOMEN (28 February) 2022. Explainer: how gender inequality and climate change are interconnected: https://www.unwomen.org/en/news-stories/explainer/2022/02/explainer-how-gender-inequality-and-climate-change-are-interconnected

Ecofeminism: A Global crisis. Explainer video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jM524nIzQdQ&list=PLFNMamj721VINFZ-5Ai_Y30RvhVp8RApj&index=6

11:00-12:00 PRIVATE SECTOR PARTICIPATION IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: PERCEPTION AND PROSPECT -Prof Franklyn Lisk (SlidesLink opens in a new window)

Overview:

This lecture will discuss the critical role played by the private sector, broadly defined, in driving economic growth and transformation in the development process. The composition of the private sector encompasses a variety of actors and stakeholders engaged and involved in the sector, ranging from smallholder subsistence-oriented agriculture, indigenous informal sector, commercialised entrepreneur-led value chain production, SMEs involved in manufacturing and retail trade to large foreign-owned businesses and transnational corporations investing in natural resource extraction, infrastructure and the services sector. Private sector development is presented in development literature as a strategy for promoting economic growth and sustainable development and as a pathway for employment creation and poverty reduction. However, the broad coverage of the definition of the private sector in practice brings confusion and incoherence to assessment of its role and impact on development outcomes. The lecture will explore challenges and prospects for the private sector to fulfil expectations of being an engine of growth in the economy, and opportunities for convergence of domestic and international actors in the sector. It will also consider conditions for local and national government authorities to work with the private sector under arrangements of public-private-partnerships (PPPs), with the aim of unlocking and mobilising private sector capital and know-how to support economic development and employment creation objectives, while paying attention to concerns of environmental degradation.

Reading List:

Lisk, F. 2011. “Stimulating private participation” in Yumkella, K., P. Kormawa et al (eds.) Agribusiness for Africa’s prosperity. Vienna: UNIDO.

UNCTAD, 2011. Foreign direct investments in LDCs: Lessons learned from the decade 2001-2010 and the way forward. New York and Geneva: UNCTAD.

Department for International Development (DfID), UK Government, 2011. The engine of development: The private sector and the prosperity of poor people. London: DfID.

13:00-14:00 THE ORIGIN OF THE SUSTAINABILITY PROBLEM -Dr Eleanya Nduka (SlidesLink opens in a new window)

Overview:

In this lecture, we will learn how economic activity depends upon and affects the natural environment and the proximate drivers of the economy’s impact on the environment, population, affluence and technology. Also, we will use recent data to gain insights into population growth, poverty and inequality.

Reading List:

Perman et al. (2011), Natural resource and environmental economics (4th edition), Harlow: Pearson education limited. Part I, Chapter 2.

14:00-15:00 SEMINAR -Dr Eleanya Nduka

Seminar Questions:

  1. Discuss the gendered implications of environmental degradation and climate change, with particular focus on the impact on the Global South.
  2. What policy recommendations might be implemented (and by whom) to tackle the effects of climate change in a gender equitable way?
  1. Would private sector involvement in delivery of essential public services such as water, electricity, etc. be in the common interest of society?
  2. Give examples of how public-private- partnerships can combine the best of both sectors – i.e., public sector’s notion of accountability and environmental responsibility and the private sector’s values of managerial efficiency and entrepreneurship.

Friday 29/7

10:00-11:00 CHINA-AFRICA TRADE RELATIONS AND POLICY ENGAGEMENT - Prof Franklyn Lisk (SlidesLink opens in a new window)

Overview:

This lecture will review the current status of trade relationship between African countries and China, focusing on Africa’s strategic priorities and policy orientation for trade engagement with China in the context of the region’s evolving African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AFCFTA).

Reading List:

Lisk, F., 2017. Contextualising the China Development Model (CDM) in African Paradigms of Development: A Research Framework for Analysing China-Africa Relations in a Changing Global Order. Paper presented at the Hallsworth Conference on ‘China and the Changing Global Order’, University of Manchester, UK., 23-24 March 2017.

Cheru, F. and C. Obi (eds.), 2010. The rise of China and India in Africa. London: Zed Books.

Fishman, T., 2006. China Inc: The relentless rise of the next great superpower. London: Simon & Schuster, UK.

Brautigam, D., 2021. Coevolutionary pragmatism: Approaches and impacts of China-Africa economic cooperation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

11:00-12:00 HUMANITARIAN INTERVENTIONS - Dr Akin Oyawale (SlidesLink opens in a new window)

Overview:

This lecture addresses humanitarian intervention through unpacking the various ways in which states and other aggregated wills such as international institutions have intervened within sovereign jurisdictions with the primary objective of enforcing human rights and justice. Should this be acceptable? Are they legal? Under what conditions should states or international organisations intervene? Are there limits to what can be done during an intervention? These are the few questions that this lecture will address.

Reading List:

Donnelly, J., 1993. Human rights, humanitarian crisis, and humanitarian intervention. International Journal, 48(4), pp.607-640.

Wheeler, N.J., 2000. Saving strangers: Humanitarian intervention in international society. OUP Oxford. (Read Chapter 1 – Humanitarian Intervention and International Society).

13:00-14:00 NATURAL RESOURCE EXPLOITATION: RENEWABLE V. NON-RENEWABLE RESOURCES -Dr Eleanya Nduka (SlidesLink opens in a new window)

Overview:

This lecture will focus on how resource use patterns are linked with sustainability. We will discuss forest resources and their role in combating climate change. We will discuss the role of governments and international agencies in growing and preserving forests through payment for ecosystem services (PES). We will also analyse how poverty and debt are sources of pressure on the forests.

Reading List:

The Katoomba Group and UNEP (2008). Payments for ecosystem services
getting started: A Primer. Washington: Forest Trends and The Katoomba Group. https://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/9150/payment_ecosystem.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

Perman et al. (2011), Natural resource and environmental economics (4th edition), Harlow: Pearson education limited. Part IV of Chapter 18.

Tientenberg T. and L. Lewis (2014), Environmental economics and policy (6th edition), Harlow: Pearson education limited. Chapter 12.

14:00-15:00 SEMINAR -Dr Eleanya Nduka

Seminar Questions:

  1. What is PES?
  2. What are the problems with PES?
  3. What is humanitarian intervention?
  4. What challenges does humanitarian intervention pose to IR theory?
  5. What has been China’s impact on the international aid and trade architectures?
  6. Is China’s trade relations with Africa a positive factor of industrial development in African countries?