Skip to main content

Sociology (BA) (Full-Time, 2019 Entry)

 

SOCIOLOGY (BA)

Full-time 2019 entry, ABB, IB 34

With the study of social life at its heart, the scope of sociology is almost limitless. This course will introduce you to its broad subject matter, which encompasses family life, education, crime, work, war, religion and the media, to name just a few.


Open Day

Get a prospectus

With the study of social life at its heart, the scope of sociology is almost limitless. This course will introduce you to its broad subject matter, which encompasses family life, education, crime, work, war, religion, capitalism, power, food, leisure, love, health, sleep, the body, the self, human–animal relations, art, tourism and the media, to name just a few. Sociology also has an abiding concern with the main markers of social difference in modern society – class, gender, ‘race’/ethnicity, age, sexuality and (dis)ability. You’ll explore how these often intersect in shaping the life chances and experiences of individuals. In addition to lectures, interactive seminars will add depth your learning.

You’ll also benefit from the insights of guest lectures by scholars working at the cusp new subject knowledge and from opportunities to take part in field trips, including a Study trip abroad at a partner university in Europe.

In your first year, you will choose one or two modules (30CATS) from options offered within sociology (or you can even take options from outside the department, if you wish).

By your second year, you will be choosing almost 60% of your material. Your third year will be selected entirely by you; you’ll choose from our list of specialist options and also have the chance to do a dissertation (accounting for 25% of your final year marks). The dissertation will be on a topic area of your choosing, developed and agreed upon with your supervisor.

From the outset, you’ll be able to choose options from a range of specialist topics. This will allow you to develop a feel and understanding for how different fields approach important sociological questions at large. First year topics such as the media, gender, race, and the building of identity allow you to gauge your interests in these areas and build a base for more in-depth material in later years.

These later years of study are tailored by you and consist of: core research modules; a dissertation chosen by you in discussion with your supervisor; and a choice of specialist module options. You can follow a specialism in cultural studies, research methods or gender studies, or develop a varied portfolio across specialist options.

You will normally take eight different modules in each year, which are taught via lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, group work and independent study.

Contact hours

In your first year, you will have 10–11 hours of formal contact time per week, helping you adjust to university life, and thereafter usually 8 hours per week.

Class size

Seminars involve smaller groups of 15–17 students, which include some of our joint honours students, giving you the chance to make friends across complementary disciplines. We have a strong personal tutoring system and staff have weekly office hours in which you can meet with them on a one-to-one basis.

You will be assessed by a combination of essays, reports, podcasts, reflective writing and unseen exams. To support your assessment, you will submit class essays during the year and receive extensive feedback. In the final year, you write a 10,000-word dissertation on a sociological topic of your choice, with one-to-one supervision from staff. This prepares you for the needs of working life by consolidating core and transferable skills, and supports further academic study at MA and PhD level.

Your final degree classification is based on your performance across the modules taken in your second and third years. Assessment will take the form of 50% coursework and 50% examination. The final degree classification is determined by your second and final year marks and each contributes 50%.

For students on the single honours Sociology course, there is an opportunity for a study abroad visit. We support student mobility through study abroad programmes and all students have the opportunity to apply for a year abroad at one of our partner universities. The Study Abroad Team based in the Office for Global Engagement offers support for these activities, and the Department’s dedicated Study Abroad Co-ordinator can provide more specific information and assistance.

 Student blogs

melissa"Race and the Making of the Modern World - wow what a module! You get into really interesting topics such as slavery, colonisation, race, the enlightenment and more. Very much a historical module but to understand contemporary society you have to understand the journey to get to where we are today."

Check out Melissa's blog


A level: ABB

  • IB: 34

  • Contextual data and differential offers: Warwick may make differential offers to students in a number of circumstances. These include students participating in the Realising Opportunities programme, or who meet two of the contextual data criteria. Differential offers will be one or two grades below Warwick’s standard offer (to a minimum of BBB).

  • Access Courses: Access to HE Diploma (QAA-recognised) including appropriate subjects with distinction grades in level 3 units.
  • Warwick International Foundation Programme (IFP) All students who successfully complete the Warwick IFP and apply to Warwick through UCAS will receive a guaranteed conditional offer for a related undergraduate programme (selected courses only). For full details of standard offers and conditions visit the IFP website.
  • We welcome applications from students with other internationally recognised qualifications. For more information please visit the international entry requirements page.
  • Taking a gap year Applications for deferred entry welcomed.

    Interviews We do not typically interview applicants. Offers are made based on your UCAS form which includes predicted and actual grades, your personal statement and school reference.

    Open Days All students who have been offered a place are invited to visit. Find out more about our main University Open Days and other opportunities to visit us.

Year 1
Sociology of Gender

Through case studies from the gender pay gap to the politics of Christmas, this module will transform how you see gender and its impact on the world. You’ll explore the origins of gender ideas and analyse their effects on areas of social life including: language; media and popular culture; science; work; family relationships; sexuality; violence; education; politics; and feminist movements.

While gender is the focus of this module, you’ll also consider how gender connects to other dimensions of social difference and inequality, such as sexuality, race, class or disability.


Researching Society and Culture

What is society and how do you study it? Is human behaviour governed by rules similar to the natural world that you can study objectively? Or do human beings consciously act upon their environment and change the world through creativity and intelligence, driven by their own understanding and motivations.

You will be introduced to the core ideas behind sociological research and the practical tools to undertake research yourself. As well as looking at some of the key qualitative methods (e.g. interviews, ethnography, discourse analysis), you’ll also examine the political, ethical and practical issues that social research inevitably entails.


Race and the Making of the Modern World

The Haitian Revolution (1804) was the first revolution by enslaved Africans asserting their rights for liberty, equality and political self-organisation against their European colonisers. But you may not have heard of it, even though it occurs around the same time as the French and American revolutions.

This module will raise tough questions about the global processes of dispossession, genocide, enslavement and appropriation. You’ll examine:

• the emergence and development of structures of race

• the sanctioned ignorance of these processes within the usual descriptions of the modern world

• how central race is to the organisation of the world today


Class and Capitalism in the Neoliberal World

Protest and anger characterise the contemporary era – young people taking part in militant politics, protest parties gaining more votes, and even NHS doctors taking to the streets.

In this module, we’ll explore the social consequences of the economic and political transformations associated with neoliberalism that have taken place in recent decades. We will ask why these changes might be responsible for the global rise in urban unrest and dissatisfaction.

Topics will include growing inequality and elite power, militant policing, consumerism, anxiety, debt, the destruction of industrial communities, class identity, the marketisation of education, and the diminishing spaces of public life.


History of Sociological Thought

What holds societies together? How do societies change? And how is politics in the conventional sense affected by factors such as class, status, ethnicity or religion, or the state of the economy? These are some of the questions that you will engage with when you consider the history of sociological thought. You will gain skills of research, analysis and debate by considering to what extent sociology may be considered a science and how the evolution of sociological thought has been shaped by events and the cultural, economic and political problems of the day.


Introduction to Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences 1

What do we mean by the concept “social class”? What exactly is “education”? We use these words so often, but they mean different things to different people. The module will spend a substantive amount of time on breaking concepts such as these down into measurable variables, before proceeding to describing these statistically. You will also learn how to select samples and how to use these for inference using real-world data sets, allowing you to appreciate and engage with quantitative research.


Year 2
Designing and Conducting Social Research

This module will teach you the core concepts and practical skills to undertake qualitative social research in academic and professional settings. These include research design, ethnography, in-depth interviewing, documents and discourse. As well as practical skills, you’ll investigate how social research has changed in recent decades, considering:

• ethical questions when researching life online

• how (and whether you should) study Twitter

• effects of social media on social interactions

• how to engage diverse audiences

You'll also gain analytical skills to critically evaluate previous research, and develop your ability to collect and analyse data using a range of qualitative methods.


Modern Social Theory

This module will introduce you to the main thinkers and movements in critical social theory. Topics include Marxism, post-structuralism, class and culture. The changing conceptualisation of power and class is a focus throughout the module. This helps you to see how the different theoretical approaches relate to each other, and to historical and political events.


Practice and Interpretation of Quantitative Research

Quantitative methods can help you answer questions such as:

• Is income inequality in the UK growing?

• Does marriage improve health?

• Does growing up in a poor neighbourhood affect your life chances?

Analysing representative, large-scale social surveys is crucial for sociologists to understand social processes. This module will introduce you to quantitative methods and how to analyse large data sets using SPSS Statistics software. It will help you engage with published quantitative sociological research and to undertake your own basic quantitative data analysis.


Year 3
Dissertation

Selection of optional modules that current students are studying:

Sociology of Health and Medicine; Bodies, Property and Politics; Race and the Making of the Modern World; Punishment, Justice and Control; Educational Inequalities.

Our graduates have gone on to work for organisations including: BMW, British Red Cross, Deloitte LLP, Warwick Hospital, Frank PR.

Examples of our graduates’ job roles include: Account Analyst, Events Assistant, HR Researcher, Digital Media Executive, Secondary School Teacher, Policy Analyst, Charities and NGOs Consultant/Analyst/Researcher, Criminal Justice Practitioner.

A level ABB

IB 34

UCAS Code
L300

Award
Degree of Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Duration
3 years full time

Start Date

24 September 2019

Location of study
University of Warwick, Coventry

Tuition fees
Find out more about fees and funding

Additional costs

There may be costs associated with other items or services such as academic texts, course notes, and trips associated with your course.

This information is applicable for 2019 entry.

Given the interval between the publication of courses and enrolment, some of the information may change. It is important to check our website before you apply. Please read our terms and conditions to find out more.