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Programme of Events 2021-22


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Fri 1 Oct, '21
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PG Welcome Buffet Supper
Scarman Conference Centre
Sat 2 Oct, '21
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Welcome Back Activity for Returning Students
Oculus OC0.02/4

Platonic Speed Dating (speed "friending" with a Platonic twist!)

Sat 2 Oct, '21
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Welcome Back Activity: Outdoor Lunch for Returning Students
Oculus OC0.02

Lunch Outside Oculus Building

Sat 2 Oct, '21
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Welcome Back Activity: Game of Rounders
Claycroft Field 2
Wed 6 Oct, '21
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'Introduction to Active Bystander at Warwick': A Workshop for New Students

During the workshop, we will explore Warwick’s values, what it means to be an active bystander, and how we might respond when something happens which is contrary to our values. You’ll also find out about ongoing opportunities to continue your journey as an active bystander and support a positive campus experience for all. Students will be off-camera with interactive participation via anonymous voting software.

Click here to join the workshop

Sat 9 Oct, '21
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Department of Philosophy Open Day
Mon 11 Oct, '21
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Chinese Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams
Tue 12 Oct, '21
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CRPLA Seminar: Marion Thain (KCL), 'Attention Studies and Close Reading'
Wed 13 Oct, '21
-
'Introduction to Active Bystander at Warwick': A Workshop for New Students

During the workshop, we will explore Warwick’s values, what it means to be an active bystander, and how we might respond when something happens which is contrary to our values. You’ll also find out about ongoing opportunities to continue your journey as an active bystander and support a positive campus experience for all. Students will be off-camera with interactive participation via anonymous voting software.

Click here to join the workshop

Wed 13 Oct, '21
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Philosophy Department Staff Meeting+Personal Tutor Briefing
MS Teams
Wed 13 Oct, '21
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Department of Philosophy Colloquium
MS Teams

Guest Speaker: Sandra Shapshay (CUNY)

Title: 'Schopenhauer on the Moral Perception'

NB: Note the later start time of 4.15pm for this seminar.

Fri 15 Oct, '21
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Wittgenstein Reading Group

Wittgenstein is one of the 20th century's most influential philosophers and the source of many divergent reactions and interpretations. This reading group will focus on a close-reading of Philosophical Investigations in the first term (where appropriate dipping into secondary texts in order to interpret certain sections.) Depending on how far we get in the first term, we will try to read another Wittgenstein text (up to the groups preference). We will be focusing on reading Wittgenstein's philosophy in itself, rather than his relation to other thinkers and disciplines. We hope to meet weekly, but want to be as flexible as possible. For the first week, we will try to read §§1-45. We suggest the dual language Revised Fourth edition by P. M. S. Hacker and Joachim Schulte, but feel free to use whatever copy is available to you.

Contact Thomas Williams for further information.

Fri 15 Oct, '21
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Race and Philosophy Reading Group: Intersectionality
MS Teams

Below are the details for our first session of the academic year...

 Week 2: Friday 15 October 2021 - In Memory of Charles Mills (1951-2021) and in celebration of Black History Month: Charles Mills, 'Toward a Black Radical Liberalism'

 For more information (and if you need help joining the Team), contact Eileen John (eileen.john@warwick.ac.uk).

 

Tue 19 Oct, '21
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Post-Kantian European Philosophy Research Seminar Series
MS Teams

Guest Speaker: Michelle Kosch (Cornell)

Title: 'Recognition After Fichte'

Thu 21 Oct, '21
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PG Work in Progress Seminar
MS Teams

There will be a discussion of a paper by Neşe Aksoy, who will be interviewed by Dino Jakusic.

Neşe's Abstract:

Spinoza’s Conatus: A Teleological Reading of its Ethical Dimension

 In this article I examine how the teleological reading of Spinoza’s conatus shapes the ethical trajectory of his philosophy. I first introduce the Spinozistic criticism of teleology and argue contra many critics that Spinoza has a mild approach to human teleology. On the basis of this idea, I develop the claim that conatus is a teleological element pertaining to human nature. From the teleological reading of conatus, I draw the conclusion that Spinozian ethics has objective, humanistic and essentialist elements. In this sense, this paper emerges to be a challenge against the anti-teleological reading of conatus that is directly related to the subjectivistic, anti-humanistic and non-essentialist interpretation of Spinoza’s ethics. It mainly situates Spinoza in a traditionally teleological context where the human conatus is seen as an act of pursuing objective and essential moral ends that is distinctive to human nature.

Fri 22 Oct, '21
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Wittgenstein Reading Group
Zeeman A1.01.

Wittgenstein is one of the 20th century's most influential philosophers and the source of many divergent reactions and interpretations. This reading group will focus on a close-reading of Philosophical Investigations in the first term (where appropriate dipping into secondary texts in order to interpret certain sections.) Depending on how far we get in the first term, we will try to read another Wittgenstein text (up to the groups preference). We will be focusing on reading Wittgenstein's philosophy in itself, rather than his relation to other thinkers and disciplines. We hope to meet weekly, but want to be as flexible as possible. For the first week, we will try to read §§1-45. We suggest the dual language Revised Fourth edition by P. M. S. Hacker and Joachim Schulte, but feel free to use whatever copy is available to you.

We meet in person, but people who are not able to come to campus are welcome to join via teams (With this link: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/team/19%3achIBNXEVzbScpcKNlyGY3OczMIMvSc_3PBgAV6YVa3g1%40thread.tacv2/conversations?groupId=06aa190c-4ffb-4ad3-a9b6-bd6a20ae5761&tenantId=09bacfbd-47ef-4465-9265-3546f2eaf6bc )

Please contact Thomas Williams for further information

Thomas.Williams.1@warwick.ac.uk

Fri 22 Oct, '21
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Postgraduate Professional Development Workshop
MS Teams

2.00 – 2.30 Literature search skills and tools 

(Kate Courage, Academic Support Librarian)
2.30 – 3.00 Planning your MA (Diarmuid Costello)
3.30 – 3.30 Planning your PhD/MPhil (Diarmuid Costello)
3.45 – 4.30 Applying for PhD programmes and scholarships (Matt Nudds) 

Fri 22 Oct, '21
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Women in the History of Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

Contact Andrew Cooper for further information.

Sat 23 Oct, '21
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Department of Philosophy Open Day
Mon 25 Oct, '21
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Chinese Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams
Tue 26 Oct, '21
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CRPLA Seminar: Michael Räber (UCLA/Zurich), ‘Democratic Visibility: The import of Cavell’s aesthetics of film to a political philosophy of visibility’
Wed 27 Oct, '21
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Moral and Philosophical Reading Group

Please contact Andrew J Paull for further information.

Thu 28 Oct, '21
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'Getting Acquainted With Art' by Matt Duncan and Hannah Nahas
By Zoom

Getting Acquainted with Art 

By Matt Duncan and Hannah Nahas 

We learn from art. By viewing, hearing, touching, creating, performing, and in yet other ways interacting with art, we gain new knowledge—knowledge that we wouldn’t have had, and perhaps couldn’t have had, without encountering that art. That’s obvious. But what is less obvious is the nature, or structure, of this knowledge—what constitutes it. A standard assumption in contemporary analytic philosophy is that all knowledge is and must be propositional—that is, constituted by beliefs in propositions. However, this assumption, despite being standard, has come under attack in recent years. One front in this attack comes from aesthetics and philosophy of art, where some philosophers have claimed that some knowledge gained from art is non-propositional. In this paper we will fortify and expand this front by giving new reasons to think that some knowledge from art is indeed non-propositional and is instead “knowledge of things,” which is constituted, not by beliefs in propositions, but by awareness of properties and objects. We will also fill a gap in the contemporary literature by giving an account of this knowledge—of its nature, structure, and relation to other knowledge.

 

Fri 29 Oct, '21
-
Wittgenstein Reading Group
H0.43 (to join via teams contact Thomas Williams

Wittgenstein is one of the 20th century's most influential philosophers and the source of many divergent reactions and interpretations. This reading group will focus on a close-reading of Philosophical Investigations in the first term (where appropriate dipping into secondary texts in order to interpret certain sections.) Depending on how far we get in the first term, we will try to read another Wittgenstein text (up to the groups preference). We will be focusing on reading Wittgenstein's philosophy in itself, rather than his relation to other thinkers and disciplines. We hope to meet weekly, but want to be as flexible as possible. For the first week, we will try to read §§1-45. We suggest the dual language Revised Fourth edition by P. M. S. Hacker and Joachim Schulte, but feel free to use whatever copy is available to you.

Please contact Thomas Williams for further information

Thomas.Williams.1@warwick.ac.uk

Fri 29 Oct, '21
-
Women in the History of Philosophy Reading Group
MS Teams

Contact Andrew Cooper for further information.

Fri 29 Oct, '21
-
Race and Philosophy Reading Group: Intersectionality
MS Teams

Week 4: Friday 29 October 2021 - Charles Mills, '"Ideal Theory" as Ideology'

For more information (and if you need help joining the Team), contact Eileen John (eileen.john@warwick.ac.uk).

Tue 2 Nov, '21
-
Post-Kantian European Philosophy Research Seminar Series
MS Teams

Guest Speaker: Tuomo Tiisala (Helsinki)

Title: 'Truth, the Whole Truth, and Politics and Truth: Foucault on the Revaluation of Values'

Wed 3 Nov, '21
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Department of Philosophy Colloquium
MS Teams

Guest Speaker: Robert Brandom (Pittsburgh)

Title: 'The Fine Structure of Autonomy and Recognition'

Wed 3 Nov, '21
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Reading Group: Law and Morality in Early 20th Century Marxism
MS Teams

Law and Morality in Early 20th Century Marxism 

In this reading group, we examine the relationship of law and morality through the eyes of early 20th century Marxist literature. This was a time of acute crisis in Western political history. The workers’ movement was in tumult, with the ruination of the 2nd International, the repression of revolutionary fervour in Europe, and the rise of fascism. As old powers crumbled and others arose, the moral status of law came into focus. A new radicalism asked out loud: Is there anything inherently good about the legal order?

In each session, we relate the selected literature to philosophical problems surrounding state, law, and morality. Among other things, we will discuss the critique of natural law, examine the link between history and moral judgments, and have a closer look at the Marxist notion of ideology.

No prior knowledge is required; open debate is highly encouraged. Each session will focus on one text (see below). Digital copies of the texts will be provided on Teams, some also in an abridged version (at least one week in advance). Ross or Simon will provide a brief introduction to each text, then there is roughly one hour for discussion.

1st session: 3 November 2021

Karl Marx (1843): “On the Jewish question.” In Marx and Engels Collected Works, vol. 3, 146–174. London: Lawrence & Wishart, 1975.

 

Ross Ferrara (ross.ferrara@warwick.ac.uk)

Simon Gansinger (simon.gansinger@warwick.ac.uk)

 

Wed 3 Nov, '21
-
Moral and Philosophical Reading Group

Please contact Andrew J Paull for further information.