Skip to main content

Dr Stella Chatzitheochari explains why campaigns against bullying are important

stellaDr Stella Chatzitheochari, Associate Professor in the University of Warwick Department of Sociology, comments on her recent research which found that children and young people with disabilities and Special Educational Needs are more likely to be bullied at school compared to those with no known disabilities.

She said: “Anti-Bullying Week is an exemplary initiative of the Anti-Bullying Alliance aiming to tackle school bullying and to create safe school environments for children and young people. This year’s theme is All Different, All Equal, identified by children and young people participating in ABA’s consultation survey.

“Our research confirms that being perceived as different is a risk factor for being bullied in school. We analysed nationally representative data and found that children and young people with disabilities and Special Educational Needs are more likely to be bullied at school compared to those with no known disabilities.

“This is a particularly worrying finding: There is growing evidence that bullying victimisation contributes to negative labour market and well-being outcomes later in adulthood, and we are currently conducting further research to see if this is the case for individuals who have been identified with a disability or Special Educational Needs during childhood and adolescence.”

This animated video was created to illustrate the research findings for the general public and key stakeholders.

16 November 2017

Contact:

Sheila Kiggins,

Media Relations Manager, Social Science

+44 (0) 7876 218166

+44 (0) 2476 150 423

s.kiggins@warwick.ac.uk