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September 2021

Name Description Last Editor Last Updated Keywords
al_orangutan_2.jpg Alice Scott 28/09/21
al_orangutan_3.jpg Alice Scott 28/09/21
al_orangutan_4.jpg Alice Scott 28/09/21
al_orangutan.jpg Alice Scott 28/09/21
CPR event Jade Wilmot (Resuscitation for Medical Disciplines Society) and their team, Dr Jane Bryan (Community Values Education Programme) and representatives from the Warwick Life Saving Society and the Warwick First Aid Society. Peter Thorley 15/10/21
Dr Ed Brambley, WMG/Maths Dr Ed Brambley, WMG/Maths Alice Scott 14/10/21
Dr Emily Hill Dr Emily Hill from the School of Life Sciences. Peter Thorley 23/09/21
Dr Freya Harrison Dr Freya Harrison Alice Scott 14/10/21
Ed Brambley ring rolling image credit Hammerwerk Erft. Ed Brambley ring rolling image credit Hammerwerk Erft. Alice Scott 13/10/21
emily_hillman.png Dr Emily Hill from the School of Life Sciences. Peter Thorley 23/09/21
Hande Ciyar Hande Ciyar Tom Frew 11/10/21 Hande Ciyar
L3 Sajjad Alice Scott 12/10/21
L3 Sajjad Alice Scott 12/10/21
L3 Sajjad Alice Scott 12/10/21
L3 Sajjad Alice Scott 12/10/21
L3 Sajjad Alice Scott 12/10/21
Merging neutron stars Merging neutron stars. Credit: University of Warwick/Mark Garlick Peter Thorley 06/10/21
microsoftteams-image_5.jpg Alice Scott 12/10/21
microsoftteams-image_7.jpg Alice Scott 12/10/21
MSI heatmap Prof. Nasir Rajpoot MSI heatmap Prof. Nasir Rajpoot Alice Scott 14/10/21
MSI heatmap Prof. Nasir Rajpoot 2 Spatial map of a colorectal cancer tissue section produced by the IDARS algorithm, mapping a proxy measure of instability (red) or stability (green) for DNA microsatellites in the tumour. Tissue regions without any overlay are non-tumour. Colon cancer cases with high microsatellite instability are generally more likely to respond to expensive immunotherapy treatments. Alice Scott 18/10/21
nesf_1.jpeg Peter Thorley 20/09/21
nesf_2.jpeg Peter Thorley 20/09/21
nesf_3.jpeg Peter Thorley 20/09/21
Propellor star Credit: University of Warwick/Mark Garlick Peter Thorley 15/10/21
VLR Image 1 L to R Margot James, Prof Stuart Croft and Cllr Jim O'Boyle with model of VLR track Peter Thorley 27/09/21
VLR Image 2 L to R Prof Stuart Croft, Margot James and Cllr Jim O'Boyle with model of VLR track Peter Thorley 27/09/21
White Cliffs of Dover White Cliffs of Dover Tom Frew 16/09/21 White Cliffs of Dover
White Dwarf System_01 Planets orbiting from a sufficient distance can continue to exist after their star dies. New evidence gathered from a solar system like our own suggests that Jupiter and Saturn might survive the Sun’s red giant phase — when it burns the last of its nuclear fuel and collapses some 5 billion years from now. Credit: W. M. Keck Observatory/Adam Makarenko Peter Thorley 14/10/21