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Translating Women Blog

Translating Women Blog

Industry-facing research project run by Dr Helen Vassallo (Modern Languages and Cultures, University of Exeter). Launched in 2018 to mark the Year of Publishing Women, Translating Women engages with publishers, translators and other stakeholders to work against gender bias in the UK translated literature market. As well as regular reviews and opinion posts on the Translating Women blog, the research-focused aspect of the project uses interviews with stakeholders alongside data analysis to look at which women authors get published, who translates them, and whether their geographical location or source language influences publishing decisions or literary reception. Translating Women challenges gender bias in all its forms, and its activist aims are inclusive and intersectional.

Translating Women Blog

Women in Translation Tumblr

Run by translators Margaret Carson and Alta L. Price who cofounded the Women in Translation Tumblr in 2015: 'Raising awareness of women in translation by posting writeups, Q&As, charts & graphs, reading reports, letters to the editor, links to reviews and announcements and more. We cover woman-identified writers, translators, editors, reviewers, bloggers, and others who are part of the conversation about the gender gap and other gaps in translation.'

Biblibio

Biblibio

Blog by Meytal Radzinski, who founded the #WITMonth in 2014: 'Biblibio is not a review blog. What does that mean? It means that the humble figure behind the veil sees the purpose of this blog as discussing a life in books in general, not only through reviews (though obviously somewhat). Bibli - book. Bio - life. This is a life in letters. [...] This blog may be used as a hub for information about the women in translation project and WITMonth, which I founded and manage.'

Translating Women 2019

Translating Women 2019

Conference organised by Dr Olga Castro (University of Warwick) and Dr Helen Vassallo (University of Exeter): 'This conference will explore the circuits of translation of women-authored literature into English, with the aim of promoting synergies between academic and publishing contexts. By questioning the power dynamics of the English-language book industry, it seeks to offer fresh insights into the cultural, social, economic and political implications of making foreign women writers available to English-speaking readers, considering where "borders" lie in translated literature, and how and why women might destabilise them. Our feminist perspective challenges the lack of recognition and influence of women writers, and our transnational and geopolitical focus encourages a cross-cultural understanding'.

Project Plume

Project Plume

Founded by Salwa Benaissa: 'An independent literary initiative dedicated to championing women writers from less-represented languages and cultures in English translation. [...] Our first undertaking is to publish translated literature by women authors from less-represented languages in a bi-annual English-language anthology. Each print issue focuses on a literary culture and/or region, showcasing a diverse representation of prose and poetry alongside visual art on a common theme.'

Encounters seminar

Encounters: Writers and Translators in Conversation

A seminar series held in Nottingham and London. Organised by Dr Heike Bartel (German Studies, University of Nottingham) and Dr Godela Weiss-Sussex (IMLR). '[Encounters] brings together writers and their translators in front of an audience, providing a unique opportunity to experience author and translator reading from the text and in conversation, and allowing a fascinating insight into the working relationship between the two as well as the practical and theoretical aspects of translation.'