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Transport in and Computing with DNA

February 14th 2005

MIR@W-Day and CSC One-Day Workshop

Centre for Scientific Computing, University of Warwick

Organiser: R.A. Roemer (Warwick)




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Background and Purpose

Understanding how charge is transported in solids, liquids, molecules, in nanostructures - artificial or self-assembled -, in biological systems or chemical substances has always been the key to their eventual use as devices. For example, the current understanding of transport in semiconductor devices is at the heart of the continuing growth in the IT and computer sector as well as the consumer electronics market.

At everyday lengths and time scales, charge transport appears quite well understood, governed by Coulombs laws and Newtons equations. But when we reduce the system size or enhance the effects of the quantum mechanical nature of the system, say, by reducing the temperature, interesting and new physics emerges. A most interesting example of a wire-like structure is provided by the double-helix of deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA), the carrier of genetic information. In order to express its genetic contents it must interact not just chemically with other bio-molecules - electronic or ionic transport processes should be important as well. From a technological point of view, DNA could be engineered to act as a molecular wire or a transistor with potential nanotechnology applications. It is equally intriguing to medical scientists because some DNA repair mechanisms have been reported to include processes involving electrons, for example, skin cancer and other skin related conditions. It is therefore relevant to use methods developed to describe electronic transport in physics also to this biologically relevant structure and in particular, investigate whether a connection between its biological function and electronic properties can be established.

It is only recently that these advances in DNA research, combined with tremendous progress in nano-structure experimentation techniques, have made investigations of DNA transport properties feasible. However, while important experimental and theoretical benchmarks have already been established, it is not yet even clear whether DNA should be characterized as a metal, a semiconductor or an insulator. Furthermore, the theoretical models also differ widely. The present conference will bring together some of the laeding players in the field and thus contribute towards establishing the necessary ground work.


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Preliminary Programme

This preliminary programme is still subject to major changes.

Time Title Speaker
08:30-08:50 Registration  
08:50-09:00 Welcome  
09:00-09:50 Quantum transport in DNA wires: Influence of a dissipative environment Rafael Gutierrez
09:50-10:00 discussion  
10:00-10:30 tea, coffee and biscuits  
10:30-11:20 Electronic Transport through DNA Molecules Artur Erbe
11:20-11:30 discussion  
11:30-13:00 poster and lunch  
13:00-13:50 SPM and Charge Transport Measurements of Various DNA and DNA-based Molecules Danny Porath
13:50-14:00 discussion  
14:00-14:30 Embedding methods for transport in DNA
[cancelled due to illness]
John Inglesfield
14:00-14:50 Electronic Transport in DNA - the disorder perspective Daphne Klotsa
14:50-15:00 discussion  
15:00-15:30 tea, coffee and biscuits  
15:30-16:20 Towards Molecular Computation or Genetically-modified Computers David Hodgson
16:20-16:30 discussion  
16:30-17:20 Exploring the Sequence Dependent Structure and Dynamics of DNA with Molecular Dynamics Simulation Sarah Anne Harris
17:20-17:30 discussion  
17:30- Drinks and snacks (Farewell)  

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Participants

The symposium  will start at 08:30am at the University of Warwick. Note that the university is located at the outskirts of Coventry and not in Warwick. See http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/ for travel details and http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/maps/ for maps of the central campus. In case you come by car, parking is available for delegates at car park 15.

  Name Affiliation Contribution
1 Mark Broome University of Warwick -
2 Alexander Croy University of Warwick -
3 Amit Doegar NITTTR, India DNA and Electronics Era.
4 Artur Erbe Universitaet Konstanz Electronic Transport through DNA Molecules.
5 Rafael Gutierez Universität Regensburg Electronic Transport through DNA molecular wires.
6 Sarah Anne Harris University of Leeds Exploring the Sequence Dependent Structure and Dynamics of DNA with Molecular Dynamics Simulation
7 David Hodgson University of Warwick -
8 Joanna Hanna University of Warwick -
9 Manik Hapsara University of Warwick -
10 John Inglesfield University of Cardiff -
11 Daphne Klotsa University of Nottingham Electronic Transport in DNA - the disorder perspective
12 Ritesh Krishna University of Warwick -
13 R.S. Mackay University of Warwick -
14 Olubosede Olusayo Adekunie Ajasin University, Nigeria -
15 Frank Pinski University of Warwick & of Cincinnati -
16 Danny Porath University of Jerusalem SPM and Charge Transport Measurements of Various DNA and DNA-based Molecules
17 Rudolf A Römer University of Warwick -
18 Christoph Sohrmann University of Warwick -
19 Jionglong Su University of Warwick -

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Venue

Registration will be held in the Common Room of the Mathematics Institute and all talks will be held in Lecture Room B3.02 of the Mathematics Institute. This is building 35 of the Warwick central campus.

The workshop will start with the registration at 08:30 am at the University of Warwick. Note that the university is located at the outskirts of Coventry and not in Warwick. See http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/ for travel details and http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/maps/ for maps of the central campus. In case you come by car, parking is available for delegates at car park 15.


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Registration

Please complete this online registration form if you intend to visit the workshop.


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