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Multilingualism and Diversity


Multilingualism and Diversity (MultiDiv)

MultiDiv is a specialised and highly intensive summer programme for students and academic/non-academic stakeholders interested in Multilingualism, Diversity and Social Justice pedagogy, policy and research from a Linguistics, Modern Languages and Translation Studies angle. MultiDiv is a unique hub which brings together senior academics as well as UG (undergraduate) /PG (postgraduate) research developed through the formal curriculum and relevant extracurricular activities. It takes the form of an intensive, face-to-face week-long activity and involves workshops, data training and sessions on interpreting research for wider audiences, policy makers and the media most notably.

MutliDiv is, by design, relevant to curriculum content directly addressing issues related to multilingualism in society. MutliDiv has already brought together Warwick/Monash students and it is an opportunity to develop a global network which can organically grow through the interests of its community.

To our knowledge, there is no other summer programme bringing together those discipline areas and with a structure similar to what MutliDiv is committed to. Specifically, the emphasis on bringing together UG/PG research is a unique feature of MutliDiv. To our knowledge there is no other programme that includes UG researchers as equal participants to PhD students and senior academics. MultiDiv seeks to become an incubator for new ideas, research projects, curriculum innovation and policy intervention. MultiDiv is aligned with the Communities of Practice (CofP) framework and seeks to empower the participants, from all career stages, to drive innovation in teaching, learning, research and policy.



Who is this module open to?

Pre-requisites: Basic research methods training.

Co-curricular (0 CATS): Open to all degree level students at Warwick.

Credit bearing: Open to all first year and intermediate level (second year) students, and students in the third year of a four year course (towards Masters) at Warwick

  • ET227-15 - Intermediate, taken in first year for 15 CATS credit to intermediate year (2022/23)
  • ET330-15 - Finalist, taken in intermediate year for 15 CATS credit to final year (2022/23)
  • ET9D8-15 - Masters, taken in the third/ Bachelor level year for 15 CATS to Masters year (2022/23)

Students from Linguistics, Modern Languages and Translation can benefit directly from the module content.

Key dates

This module will take place 27 June - 15 July 2022.

  • Prep week: 27 June - 1 July 2022
  • Teaching: 4-15 July 2022
  • Final assessment deadline: w/c 3 October 2022

Costs

No costs have been identified for this module.

Location

This module will be taught at the Warwick campus, Coventry.

What's special about our modules?

This programme will challenge your thinking, develop your confidence and open up a world of new opportunities. You’ll consider new ideas, apply theory to real world issues working in teams and individually, and develop new networks, connections and friendships. This will provide you strong analytical and research methods skills which also enhance your employability profile for a globalised world of work, derived from a transformative blend of online learning and intercultural engagement.

Access to Intercultural Training and Undergraduate Research schemes will provide further enhancement of your skills.

The intensive nature of our programme lets you focus purely on your chosen modules.

You should expect one to two weeks of daily face-to-face sessions (on campus or online as appropriate and possible) and one to two weeks of online activities. The aim is to work in groups consisting of incoming students (usually including Monash students) and Warwick students during the module. Assessments will consist of a mix of group and individual activities.

There are no additional programme fees to take our modules.

Where will you be taught?

Our intensive modules are taught in various ways: either blended (combing online learning and face-to-face teaching) or fully online. Blended modules will be based at Warwick central campus, or our overseas residentials will be based at selected European locations relevant to module content (Covid-19 permitting). Our modules are designed to be taught in an intensive way, combining physical teaching, where possible, and online activities. We have the flexibility to move wholly online if it's needed too.

Whichever teaching structure transpires, all participants will be expected to attend all lectures and group work activities in real time, be it in person or online; this might include some activities in the prep week (where listed in Key dates). As modules are intensive there is not expected to be free time during the teaching period for you to undertake other activities.


Professor Jo Angouri (Module Leader)

Professor Jo Angouri is the Academic Director for Education and Internationalisation and serves on the Education Executive at the University of Warwick. Jo leads on the development and growth of existing and new international education projects with Warwick's strategic partners. She is also the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Applied Linguistics. Jo is a National Teaching Fellow and fully committed to pedagogic innovation and education for global citizenship. She has designed a range of UG and PGT programmes and has expertise in Undergraduate Research, Challenge-Based Learning and Curriculum Development.

Her research involves three interrelated strands: Leadership and teamwork in high-pressure, high-risk professional settings; Language, politics and ideology; Migration, mobility and multilingualism. Jo is also working on research in pedagogic innovation. She is co-directing two international research networks, one under the Warwick-Monash alliance on Migration Identity and Translation and one under AILA on Migrants in Working life which have brought together a range of established scholars, early career researchers as well as non-academic stakeholders.

She is the founding editor of Language at Work series (Multilingual Matters) and she is also co-editing Discourse Approaches to Politics, Society and Culture for John Benjamins.

She has strong presence and involvement in research policy and works for the UK Economic and Social Research Council and the Arts and Humanities Research Council. In the last ten years she has published 70 refereed papers, three special issues, two books, three edited volumes and two conference proceedings.

She has been a visiting scholar in different institutions in New Zealand, Australia and Europe and she is currently a Visiting Distinguished Professor at Aalto University, School of Business, Finland.

Chantal Wright

Chantal Wright is Reader of Translation as a Literary Practice in the Warwick Writing Programme at the University of Warwick. She is also a literary translator working from German and French into English.

You can find more information about her translations at chantalwright.org.

Dr Louisa Willoughby

Based at Monash University, Dr Louise Willoughby is a sociolinguist/ applied linguist deeply interested in how multlicultural societies respond to linguistic diversity. She works with mainstream institutions such as schools, hospitals and libraries in Australia to explore better ways of engaging with clients from non-English speaking backgrounds and developing multilingual language proficiency.

As part of this she has an abiding interest in the relationship between language, identity and social cohesion and the ways that people's attitudes about languages contribute to broader inclusion and exclusion.

Much of her recent work looks at Deaf sign language users, but she also has a strong interest in migrant languages, especially for small and newly-arrived migrant groups.

Her work has been published in leading journals such as Journal of Pragmatics and Journal of Multillingual and Multicultural Development, and her monograph Language practices of migrant youth: from school to home was published by Routledge in 2018.


Module aims

The linguistically diverse nature of contemporary societies is related to a range of complex phenomena in the areas of:

  • language policy and practice
  • language contact and change
  • translation, interpreting and heritage learning
  • public sector translation/interpretation
  • translation and human rights.

Outline syllabus

This is an indicative module outline only to give an indication of the sort of topics that may be covered. Actual sessions held may differ.

  • Core issues on Multilingualism and Diversity
  • Translation and exophony
  • Linguistic Landscaping
  • Language and power
  • Designing and carrying out a linguistic landscaping project
  • Census training
  • Multilingual fieldwork & observation design
  • Data analysis methods.

Learning outcomes

Intermediate level (second year)

By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • demonstrate understanding of key concepts, terminology, research methods and theories related to multilingualism
  • demonstrate ability to critically discuss different approaches to multilingualism and diversity. Show awareness of key issues around intercultural interaction and the relationship with multilingualism and multiculturalism
  • evaluate critically how different theoretical & methodological approaches and concepts help to study multilingualism and diversity
  • design and carry out an original small scale study on multilingualism, typically from a linguistic landscape angle
  • communicate the results of their study to an audience.
Finalist level

By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • demonstrate a systematic understanding of key concepts, terminology, research methods and theories related to multilingualism
  • demonstrate a solid ability to critically discuss different approaches to multilingualism and diversity. Show awareness of key issues around intercultural interaction and the relationship with multilingualism and multiculturalism
  • evaluate critically how different theoretical & methodological approaches and concepts help to study multilingualism and diversity
  • design and carry out an original small-scale study on multilingualism, typically from a linguistic landscape angle which expands current theoretical frameworks and/or analytical tools
  • communicate the results of their study to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.
Masters level

By the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of key concepts, terminology, research methods and theories related to multilingualism and originality in the application of this knowledge
  • demonstrate an advanced ability to critically discuss different approaches to multilingualism and diversity. Show critical awareness of key issues around intercultural interaction and the relationship with multilingualism and multiculturalism
  • evaluate critically how different theoretical & methodological approaches and concepts help to study multilingualism and diversity and, where appropriate, propose new hypotheses
  • deal with complex issues related to multilingualism, both systematically and creatively and make sound judgements in the absence of complete data
  • autonomously design and carry out an original small-scale study on multilingualism – typically from a linguistic landscape angle – which provides a strong and viable research-led solution to a real-world problem and show strong ability to interpret findings for policy recommendations
  • communicate the results of their study clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Indicative reading list

  • Angouri, Jo. 2013. “The Multilingual Reality of the Multinational Workplace: Language Policy and Language Use.” Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 34 (6). Routledge: 564–81

  • Angouri, Jo. 2018. "Quantitative, qualitative, mixed or holistic research? Combining methods in linguistic research". Research methods in linguistics, London: Bloomsbury Publishing: 35-55

  • Backhaus, P. (2006). “Multilingualism in Tokyo: A look into the linguistic landscape.” In Linguistic Landscape: A New Approach to Multilingualism (pp. 52-66). Channel View Publications

  • Blackledge, Adrian, and Kiran Trehan. 2018. “Language, Superdiversity, and Self-Employment.” In The Routledge Handbook of Language and Superdiversity, edited by Adrian Blackledge and Angela Creese, 299–311. London: Taylor & Francis

  • Clyne, Michael, Louisa Willoughby, and Julia Bradshaw. 2009. “Linguistic Diversity in South-East Melbourne.” People and Place 17 (1): 55–62

  • Creese, Angela, and Adrian Blackledge. 2019. “Translanguaging and Public Service Encounters: Language Learning in the Library.” The Modern Language Journal 103 (4): 800–814

  • Heller, M., Pietikäinen S. & Pujolar J. (2018). Critical Sociolinguistic Research Methods. Studying language issues that matter. Routledge; -- section 3.2; Observing: Finding out what people do (p. 77-85), & -- section 3.3; Eliciting: Finding out what people say (p. 85-92)

  • Musgrave, Simon, Steve Wright, Tom Denison, and Louisa Willoughby. 2020. “Managing Multilingual Collections: Insights from Data Analytics Research.” Journal of Librarianship and Information Science 52 (3). SAGE Publications Ltd: 853–63

Research element

The programme is tailored around original research. This involves the design as well as the carrying out of projects on linguistic landscapes.

Interdisciplinary

The module is designed to provide the students with an understanding of relationships between the different disciplinary areas within multilingualism, particularly linguistics, modern languages and translation studies. It also invites the students to make connections with other disciplinary areas covered in their main study programme. It provides the students with a critical understanding of dominant traditions and methodologies associated with the main phenomena covered in the module and enables the students to transcend disciplinary boundaries. The interdisciplinary course cohort provides contact opportunities and learning to see from different perspectives is a core aspect of the learning experience.

International

The module draws on cases from different contexts, including different geopolitical areas, professional environments and linguistic contexts. The content and assessment invite the students to reflect on the societal relevance in different environments of the phenomena covered in the module. The assessment involves students working in groups with academic and ideally non-academic stakeholders which (will) allow for a global and local outlook to be built into the module’s work. The international and diverse course cohort provides contact opportunities and learning to see from different perspectives is a core aspect of the learning experience.

Subject specific skills

  • Design and carry out research
  • Identify different approaches to research and the paradigmatic orientations underlying these
  • State the criteria, considerations and procedures necessary to ensure that ethical requirements are met
  • Identify and describe core methods for collecting data in multilingualism and diversity research
  • Describe relevant procedures for analysing data for linguistic landscaping project
  • Identify key issues in research on multilingualism
  • Demonstrate familiarity with and ability to use appropriately features of research designs and procedures found in relevant published research articles.

Transferable skills

  • Work effectively with others in group tasks and in teams
  • Plan and manage time in projects
  • Develop strong analytical skills
  • Find, evaluate and use previous research at a level appropriate for an intermediate/ final year/ Masters level module
  • Use a range of tools and resources effectively in the preparation of course work
  • Use appropriate analytic methods to analyse research data on multilingualism
  • Read academic papers effectively in the context of an intensive programme
  • Communicate clearly and effectively in discussions
  • Communicate ideas effectively in writing.

Study time

Type Required
Lectures
10 sessions of 1 hour (7%)
Tutorials 5 sessions of 1 hour (3%)
Project supervision 5 sessions of 1 hour (3%)
Fieldwork
15 sessions of 1 hour (10%)
Online learning (scheduled sessions) 10 sessions of 1 hour (7%)
Other activity

5 hours (3%)

Groupwork:

  • data analysis
  • presentation preparation
Private study

50 hours (33%)

  • Reading subject materials
  • Homework tasks
Assessment
50 hours (33%)
Total 150 hours

Assessment

You do not need to pass all assessment components to pass the module:

  Weighting Study time
Group presentation - individual sections (15 mins) 50% 25 hours

Students collect data, process and analyse it appropriately and present/record it in academic presentation format

Group Blog Post 50% 25 hours

Students translate their findings for a wider audience and curate a blog.

Feedback on assessment

  • In session
  • On Moodle

Before you apply

You can take a maximum of two modules with AISP, and cannot take them at the same time. This module runs at the same time as the following modules, so you cannot choose these as a second module:

The preparatory reading week for this module overlaps with the following module:


Please note

  • You will need to check with your department before applying to take an AISP module
  • You are expected to fully engage and participate in the module, including in any group activities, if not your registration will be cancelled
  • Module details provided on these pages are supplementary to module details in the module catalogue. Subsequently individual module pages (moodle/my.wbs) will provide live details
  • All modules require minimum numbers to run. This is set by each module leader.

How to apply

If you want to make an enquiry before applying, please contact Sam Brook at Sam dot L dot Brook at warwick dot ac dot uk

Apply online now