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Research and employability

Warwick academics explain the link between research, employability, and innovation

Skills to take you places

What does research add to your skills base?
Due diligence
Gathering requirements
Discovery
Stakeholder mapping
Strategic analysis
Market research
Measuring impact
Self education
Financial modelling
Driver analysis
Competitive analysis
Consultancy
Project work
Business case building

Recruiters say:

"A candidate capable of effective research demonstrates an understanding of process and they have discernment for informational relevance. They understand the importance and difference of qualitative and quantitative data. The strength of a business plan depends on the ability to research the market, pricing and customer needs, so a candidate with research experience would be an attractive prospect. Research experience also suggests that a candidate would have patience, persistence and organisational and people skills."

Sam Gibson, Managing Director, Enjovia Ltd

"Having research on a CV demonstrates that a prospective candidate has the ability to digest large amounts of information and distil the most important using their analytical skills. It is important to highlight research experience if a job requires research or analytical skills. Employers want to know that a candidate’s research skills have been successfully applied, so it’s important to show what contributions your research project made."

Agata Rudd, Outreach and Recruitment Manager, Ark

“At Citi we recruit into nine business divisions, and research experience will be valued in varying measures across the organisation depending on the business you sit in and the role you assume. However, a research project can be used to demonstrate intellectual curiosity, analytical ability, focus and commitment, all of which are sought after attributes in prospective candidates and employees.”

Alicia Ramezan, EMEA Campus Relationship Manager, Citi

"Prospective candidates should be able to talk about what they consider research to be, what specifically they've researched, and the results, in a way that would make sense to almost anyone. If they can also demonstrate the relevance of their research to solving a specific challenge, I would consider them a strong candidate. Research is a necessary skill - parts of the basics and essentials that almost any candidate should have. Can you tell a personal story of why the research matters to you? Even better! If it's just 'another assignment', it would become obvious very quickly in an interview."

Miguel Garcia, Program Manager, InStruct