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Cultural and Media Policy Studies News and Events

 

Postgraduate Winter Graduation Ceremony & Reception 2017/2018

CCMPS Postgraduate Winter Graduation will be held on Wednesday 16 January 2019

Ceremony : 11.00 am start, graduands & guests to be seated by 10.30 am

Wed 21 November 2018, 09:58 | Tags: Events

AHRC Midlands4Cities funding for UK/EU students

The AHRC-funded Midlands4Cities Doctoral Training Partnership (M4C) brings together eight leading universities across the Midlands to support the professional and personal development of the next generation of arts and humanities doctoral researchers. M4C is a collaboration between the University of Birmingham, Birmingham City University, University of Warwick, Coventry University, University of Leicester, De Montfort University, Nottingham Trent University and The University of Nottingham.

M4C is awarding up to 80 doctoral studentships for UK/EU applicants for 2019 through an open competition and 11 Collaborative Doctoral Awards (CDA) through a linked competition with a range of partner organisations in the cultural, creative and heritage sector.

The Centre for Cultural and Media Policy Studies is inviting applications from students whose research interests connect with our fields of expertise in: Management and Creativity; Intellectual Property and the Creative Economy; Digital Media and Digital Memory; Cultural and Media Organisations; Global Media Industries and Policies; Creative Enterprise; Arts, Media and Sustainable Development; Cultural Policy; The Value of Culture; Cities, Spaces and National Identities; Structure and Agency in the Museums and Galleries Sector; Cultural Taste; Cultural Work; Transnational Screen Media; Media, Gender, Emotion and Ageing; Memory Studies, Archives and Popular Heritage; Media Policy and the Environment; Pedagogy, Creativity and Storytelling.

The deadline for M4C funding applications is 14 January 2019 (noon), by which time students must have applied for a place to study and have ensured that two academic references are submitted using the Midlands4Cities online reference form.

For full details of eligibility, funding, research supervision areas and CDA projects, and for dates of our November application writing workshops, please visit https://www.midlands4cities.ac.uk or contact enquiries@midlands4cities.ac.uk

Mon 12 November 2018, 16:37 | Tags: Scholarships Alumni Research news Faculty of Arts

Seminar - Joint Sociology/Centre for Cultural & Media Policy Studies

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The rise of the ‘neo-precariat’? The emerging precarious challenges for and responses of formal creative labour in advertising and public relations industries

Dr. Tommy Tse, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, The University of Hong Kong

Wednesday 7th November, IAS, Millburn House, 13:00-14:30.

In view of the changing state of the creative workforce, this presentation reworks the traditional concept of precarity as a habituated (rather than contingent) state, to explore the diversity of precarisation processes in the creative sector. In doing so it critiques Standing’s (2016) theorisation of the ‘precariat’ as a ‘class-in-the-making’, based on an increasingly temporary employment status and lacking seven forms of labour-related security. The term ‘neo-precarity’ is coined to describe the emerging, normalising perceptions of insecurity among full-time creative labourers. Theoretically, this study identifies the drivers and patterns of three new forms of neo-precarious experience and their derived anxieties and dissatisfactions. Empirically, it demonstrates how technologisation, intergenerational conflicts and the disempowerment of creativity constitute various forms of perceived insecurity among creative workers, including professional status and job status insecurity. The findings illustrate how interactions of Hong Kong public relations and advertising workers with the environmental context, institutional and organisational factors, and multiple actors are reshaping their definitions of career, career success and self-actualisation. Rather than a unique hallmark for non-standard workers, I argue that precarity should be reconceptualised as inherent to—in different degrees—all labour-capital relationships.

Thu 25 October 2018, 14:15 | Tags: Research Seminars Events News International Students Faculty of Arts

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