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  • Cambridge CMOS Sensors Ltd is sold to AMS (June 2016). Press release from Warwick University
  • Two papers have been presented at Eurosensors 2015 in Freiburg, Germany. The papers are now avaliable from Procedia Engineering journal. (Sept 2015).
  • New paper published in Applied Physica Letters (APL). (August 2015).
  • Five papers were presented at Eurosensors 2014, see proceedings for details (Sept 2014).
  • Dr Barbara Urasinska-Wojcik joined MBL as a research fellow to work on EPSRC Fuel Cell project. (August 2014)

  • Cambridge-Warwick Spin-out gets multi-million investment; Business Weekly. (July 2014)

  • Dr Prasanta Guha joins MBL as a research fellow working on an EU project called SOIHITS. (June 2014)

  • Post-doc advert out soon - apply now. (Start August)

  • ISOCS Winter School is held during 9-14 Feb 2014 on gas sensors and e-noses. See ISOCS website.

  • Best paper Award for SAWR work presented at CENICS 2013 (see here)
  • Paper presented on 1-port SAWR oscillator at IEEE CENICS meeting in Barcelona. (August 2013)
  • Plenary speaker at ISOEN 2013 in South Korea - Photo. (July 2013)
  • Spin-off wins Business Weekly CleanTech company of the year award. Professor Gardner collects award from Lord Sainsbury. Click here. (March 2013)
  • Best paper Award for SAWR work presented at CENICS 2013 (see here)
  • Paper presented on 1-port SAWR oscillator at IEEE CENICS meeting in Barcelona. (August 2013)
  • Paper presented at Transducers 2013 on PPB response of graphene to NO2. (June 2013)
  • Spin-off wins Business Weekly CleanTech company of the year award. Professor Gardner collects award from Lord Sainsbury. Click here. (March 2013)
  • ISOCS Winter Course (15-20 March 2013) now open for registration. See: www.olfactionsociety.org
  • New book chapter on e-mucosa in "Human Olfactory Displays & Interfaces" (ed. Nakamoto), 2013.
  • New Sensors and Actuators B paper on "Ratiometric info-chemical communication sytem based on polymer coated SAW microsensors" (Posted Oct 2012)
  • Our recent paper called "CMOS Interfaces for Integrated Gas Sensors" was one of the Top 25 Downloaded Papers for 4 months in IEEE Sensors Journal. (Posted May 2012)
  • A special issue has been published in the IEEE Sensors Journal covering the proceedings of the last ISOEN conference in New York (see Volume 12, 2012). Here is the editorial for the special issue. Foreword.
  • New publication in Sensors and Actuators B (2012) 173 pages 547-554 on "Ratiometric info-chemical communication system based on polymer-coated surface acoustic wave microsensors".
  • Papers were presented at IMCS 2012 in Nuremberg on New Approaches to Environmental Monitoring and SAWR based Pheromone detection. Copies are available on request. (Posted May 2012)
  • Our recent paper called "CMOS Interfaces for Integrated Gas Sensors" was one of the Top 25 Downloaded Papers for 4 m onths in the IEEE Sensors Journal. Email J.W.Gardner@warwick.ac.uk for a copy. (Posted May 2012)
  • A technical paper was recently presented at BioMED 2012 entitled "Classification of FAIMS data for detection of bowel bacteria". Copy is available on request. (Posted Feb 2012)
  • New release of List of Publications (Posted Jan 2012)
  • Our recent paper called "CMOS Interfaces for Integrated Gas Sensors" was one of the Top 25 Downloaded Papers for the IEEE Sensors Journal in december 2011. Details here. Email J.W.Gardner@warwick.ac.uk for a copy. (Posted January 2012)

 

  • Spin-out company based on Warwick IP receives award as "Start-up-of-the-year" by British Engineering Excellence Award 2011, see http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/eng/news (Posted Oct 2011)
  • The Sensors Research laboratory (SRL) has decided to rename itself to reflect the change in its direction over the past decade. It will be called Microsensors and Bioelectronics Laboratory (MBL) from 1st Feb 2011 onwards.
  • A paper is being presented at BioMED 2011 in Austria on Wednesday 16th February 2011. (Posted Jan. 2011)


The ISOCS 2010 Winter School is now open for registrations. The School's Directors are Professor Florin Udrea (University of Cambridge) and Dr Marina Cole (University of Warwick). The School will be held on 26-30 March in the Italian town of Selva Val Gardena. Theme of the School is circuits and microsystems for chemical and biology sensing.


New paper published entitled "Identification and quantification of different vapours using a single polymer chemoresistor and the novel dual transient temperature modulation technique" in Sensors and Actuators B 141 (2009) 370-380. (Posted 26.8.09)


A recent article has been published by Pearce, Sanchez and Gardner entitled “Improved odour detection through imposed biomimetic temporal dynamics” in Springer book on Biological Inspired Signal Processing for Chemical Sensing (eds. A. Gutierrez and S. Marco), Chapter 5, pp 75-92, April 2009.

Springer Chapter A recent article has been published by Pearce T. C., Sanchez and Gardner J. W. entitled “Improved odour detection through imposed biomimetic temporal dynamics” in the Springer book on Biological Inspired Signal Processing for Chemical Sensing (eds. A. Gutierrez and S. Marco), Chapter 5, pp 75-92. (17/03/2009)

Three lectures were presented at the ISOCS Winter School on “Fundamentals of multivariate data analysis for chemical and biological sensing” Austria (1-6 February 2009). Details of the lectures and the full programme can be obtained from the ISOCS website: www.olfactionsociety.org. (23/02/2009)
 
Two papers titled "SOI Diode Temperature Sensor Operated at Ultra High Temperatures: a Critical Analysis" and "Identification of Simple Taste Solutions and Their Binary Mixtures Using SH-SAW Resonator-Based Taste Sensor" have been presented at the 7th IEEE Conference on Sensors in Lecce (Italy), 26-29 October 2008.

The first paper investigates the performance of diode temperature sensors when operated at ultra high temperatures (above 250 °C). A low leakage Silicon On Insulator (SOI) diode was designed and fabricated in a high temperature 1 µm CMOS process and suspended within a dielectric membrane for efficient thermal insulation. The diode can be used for accurate temperature monitoring in a veriety of sensors such as microcalorimeters, IR detectors, or thermal flow sensors. A CMOS compatible microheater was integrated with the diode for local heating. It was found that the diode forward voltage exhibited a linear dependence on temperature as long as the reverse saturation current remained below the forward driving current. We have proven experimentally that the maximum temperature can be as high as 550 °C. Long term continuous operation at high temperatures (400 °C) showed good stability of the voltage drop. Furthermore, we carried out a detailed theoretical analysis to determine the maximum operating temperature and explain the presence of nonlinearity factors at ultra high temperatures.
The second paper reports a novel two-port resonator-based shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor that has been designed for liquid analysis. The device operates at a wireless ISM frequency of 434 MHz and is built on a 36° YX LiTaO3 piezoelectric substrate. It relies on a purely physical detection mechanism and it has been designed to function without the need for analyte-specific coatings. The sensor proved successful in identification of all six tastes: alongside the four classical tastes – saltiness, sweetness, sourness, and bitterness - test samples included solutions simulating the umami and metallic tastes. The taste sensor was also able to separate between samples of the same taste class (e.g. caffeine and quinine hydrochloride of the bitter class) as well as to detect and classify samples of the same substance with different concentrations. Furthermore, the potential to identify binary mixtures and separate them from original component solutions was tested and confirmed experimentally.

Both papers are available in the publication library. (Updated on 05/11/2008)

 

ieee_sensors_2008_saw_abstract.jpg ieee_sensors_2008_soi_diode_abstract.jpg

 

Professor Jesus Garcia-Guzman is joining the research group

We are pleased to announce that Professor Jesus Garcia-Guzman is joining the research group from 1st September as an associate fellow. His research interests are CMOS sensors and VLSI design. (25/08/2008)

 

The new International Society for Olfaction and Chemical Sensing (ISOCS) Has Been launched

The first executive committee of ISOCS has been elected:

President: Udo Weimar (University of Tübingen, Germany)
Vice President: Julian Gardner (University of Warwick, United Kingdom)
Treasurer: Rebecca Simpson (AO Action, Germany)
Secretary: Krishna Perseaud (University of Manchester, United Kingdom)

Six events are planned in the next 12 months. For further information visit: www.olfactionsociety.org
(10/06/2008)

 

Two papers titled "SOI Diode Temperature Sensor Operated at Ultra High Temperatures: a Critical Analysis" and "Identification of Simple Taste Solutions and Their Binary Mixtures Using SH-SAW Resonator-Based Taste Sensor" have been accepted for presentation at the 7th IEEE Conference on Sensors to be held in Lecce (Italy), 26-29 October 2008.

The first paper investigates the performance of diode temperature sensors when operated at ultra high temperatures (above 250 °C). A low leakage Silicon On Insulator (SOI) diode was designed and fabricated in a high temperature 1 µm CMOS process and suspended within a dielectric membrane for efficient thermal insulation. The diode can be used for accurate temperature monitoring in a veriety of sensors such as microcalorimeters, IR detectors, or thermal flow sensors. A CMOS compatible microheater was integrated with the diode for local heating. It was found that the diode forward voltage exhibited a linear dependence on temperature as long as the reverse saturation current remained below the forward driving current. We have proven experimentally that the maximum temperature can be as high as 550 °C. Long term continuous operation at high temperatures (400 °C) showed good stability of the voltage drop. Furthermore, we carried out a detailed theoretical analysis to determine the maximum operating temperature and explain the presence of nonlinearity factors at ultra high temperatures.
The second paper reports a novel two-port resonator-based shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor that has been designed for liquid analysis. The device operates at a wireless ISM frequency of 434 MHz and is built on a 36° YX LiTaO3 piezoelectric substrate. It relies on a purely physical detection mechanism and it has been designed to function without the need for analyte-specific coatings. The sensor proved successful in identification of all six tastes: alongside the four classical tastes – saltiness, sweetness, sourness, and bitterness - test samples included solutions simulating the umami and metallic tastes. The taste sensor was also able to separate between samples of the same taste class (e.g. caffeine and quinine hydrochloride of the bitter class) as well as to detect and classify samples of the same substance with different concentrations. Furthermore, the potential to identify binary mixtures and separate them from original component solutions was tested and confirmed experimentally. (Updated on 10/10/2008)
 

ieee_sensors_2008_saw_abstract.jpg ieee_sensors_2008_soi_diode_abstract.jpg

 

Paper titled "Modelling and measurement of odour transportation within the human nasal cavity" presented at Iasted 2008
IASTED 2008 Human breathing behaviour varies from quiet breathing to forceful sniffing but can, in general, be modelled as turbulent airflow. Here an anatomically correct, 3-D model of the human nasal cavity has been created using 3D CAD software and manufactured using rapid prototyping technology. Firstly, the CAD model is used to simulate the flow of an odour through the nasal cavity using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD is used to predict the velocity field within the adult nasal cavity by solving numerically the set of governing Navier-Stokes equations. The effect of nasal cavity size upon the flow fields of sniffing was also investigated. Second, chemo-resistive odour sensors were implanted within the nares; superior, medial and inferior concha or turbinates; and nasopharynx of a 3-D model of the nasal cavity. These sensors were able to detect the concentration of an odour as it travels within the nasal cavity and at the olfactory mucosa (top of superior turbinate). Our experimental measurements agreed with the computer simulations and demonstrate that a small proportion of the odour is transported to the olfactory mucosa and that it is comparatively stagnant. We believe that by modelling the flow of odours within the human nasal cavity we will be able to design a superior generation of electronic noses for medical diagnostics. (13/02/2008)

 

Paper titled "Spatio-temporal information in an artificial olfactory mucosa" published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society A

Abstract - Deploying chemosensor arrays in close proximity to stationary phases imposes stimulusdependent spatio-temporal dynamics on their response and leads to improvements in complex odour discrimination. These spatio-temporal dynamics need to be taken into account explicitly when considering the detection performance of this new odour sensing technology, termed an artificial olfactory mucosa. For this purpose, we develop here a new measure of spatio-temporal information that combined with an analytical model of the artificial mucosa, chemosensor and noise dynamics completely characterizes the discrimination capability of the system. This spatio-temporal information measure allows us to quantify the contribution of both space and time to discrimination performance and may be used as part of optimization studies or calculated directly from an artificial mucosa output. Our formal analysis shows that exploiting both space and time in the mucosa response always outperforms the use of space alone and is further demonstrated by comparing the spatial versus spatio-temporal information content of mucosa experimental data. Together, the combination of the spatio-temporal information measure and the analytical model can be applied to extract the general principles of the artificial mucosa design as well as to optimize the physical and operating parameters that determine discrimination performance. (03/01/2008) Proceedings of the Royal Society 

 

Professor Julian Gardner has been awarded the JJ Thomson Medal for achievements in Electronics

gardnerjulian.jpg

London - The Institute of Engineering and Technology, Europe's largest professional society for engineers awarded Professor Julian Gardner with the JJ Thompson Medal for Achievements in Electronics for his work on artificial olfaction and smart gas sensors. The award was presented on Tuesday, November 13 as part of Achievement Awards of the IET’s prestigious Ambition and Achievement Awards at a ceremony at the Marriott Grosvenor Hotel, London. The Achievement Awards programme recognises and rewards excellence in individuals within the engineering and technology fields. The programme covers students and young professionals who are in the early stages of their career through to individuals who are at the pinnacle of their careers. (13/11/2007)

IET Medal

 

Paper titled "Novel convolution based signal processing techniques for a simplified artificial olfactory mucosa" presented at Transducers '07

Abstract - As our understanding of the human olfactory system increases, so does our ability to design novel architctures in order to mimic the biological system. The concept of an artificial olfactory mucosa represents a new development in the field of biomimetics. Here we analyse the signals produced by such a biomimetic system that contain a spatio-temporal element not previously encountered within the field of machine olfaction or so-called electronic noses. This paper explores the use of convolution-based signal processing methodologies to exploit this richer data-set and ameliorate the well-known problems of sensor noise and drift. We show that, under certain conditions, an artificial mucosa combined with a convolution based classifier performs better than a conventional electronic nose. (10/06/2007)
Transducers 07a

 

Paper titled "Enhanced discrimination of complex odours based upon spatio-temporal signals from a micro-mucosa" presented at Transducers '07

Transducers 07b Abstract - We recently reported the novel concept of an artificial olfactory mucosa based upon a set of sensor clusters distributed along a channel coated with a retentive layer. Such a system generates complex signals containing both spatial information (i.e. response magnitude) based upon different types of sensors and temporal information (i.e. delay time like in a GC) based upon retention time differences between identical sensors. Here we report on the development of a micro artificial mucosa or micro e-mucosa. The microsystem comprises of a silicon microsensor array coupled to a true 3D micro-fluidic package fabricated by micro-stereolithography. Results show a differential temporal delay of 96 seconds between simple odours (pulses of toluene and ethanol vapour in air) and improved discrimination of complex odours by combining temporal with spatial data. We believe that this new micro e-mucosa offers a significant advance in the field of machine olfaction. (10/06/2007)

 

Paper titled "SH-SAW dual delay line based e-tongue system with improved discrimination capabilities" presented at ISOEN 2007

Abstract - Two different designs of dual-delay line shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) devices have been fabricated and characterised in order to inprove the discrimination capabilities of SAW liquid sensors. Both designs possess a dual delay line configuration where one delay line is metallized and shielded while the other is left electrically active. In addition to this, one design has metal array reflectors; these should concentrate the signal on the sensing area of the substrate and thus achieve better discrimination between the samples under test. The piezoelectric devices were fabricated on 36° rotated Y-cut X-propagating LiTaO3 substrates. Experiments to characterise the devices were conducted using different taste samples; aqueous solutions with different tastants representing the four classical basic tastes – saltiness, sweetness, sourness, and bitterness - as well as umami taste. Encouraging results were obtained and are presented in this paper. (03/05/2007)
ISOEN 2007

 

Paper titled "Towards a low-cost optical biosensor system for biomedical immunoassay applications" presented at BioMed 2007

 biomedpaper.jpg Abstract - A novel, low-cost optical measurement system has been designed for biomedical applications such as immunoassays. The system comprises a rapid-prototyped ABS plastic housing, 500 nm LED source, 530 nm UV filter, and 540 nm silicon photodiode receiver with a custom-built high gain precision amplifier. The sensor system has been designed to measure the fluorescence of different bioliquids in a standard glass test-tube. In addition, a small disc magnet can be inserted to enhanced signal-to-noise in liquids containing fluorophore-labelled magnetic beads. Our preliminary results show that the baseline optical signal depends weakly on the refractive index of the liquid and more strongly on its opaqueness. Removing this baseline signal permits the measurement of FTIC solutions down to concentrations of about 100 nMol. In addition, the insertion of the magnet was found to enhance significantly the optical signal in translucent liquids with low bead concentrations but, interesting, not in opaque ones. We believe that this low-cost (less than €150) optical immunoassay sensor has potential applications such as detecting progesterone and bacteria levels in milk, water, saliva, urine, and blood. (14/2/2007)

 

Chinese translation of "Microsensors, MEMS and Smart Devices" published

Professor Julian Gardner's book titled "Microsensors, MEMS and Smart Devices" has been translated into Chinese and published by Tsang Hai Book Publishing Co. and John Wiley & Sons (Asia) Pte Ltd. - ISBN 986-7287-02-9 mms_chinese.jpg