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The IEL Collective Blog

Our inuaugral conference held at the University of Warwick from 6 - 7 November 2019 was attended by almost 80 colleagues from all over the world. The depth and richness of the presentations and discussions at the conference were second to none. We promised to bring the conference to those who could not make it and our three-part blog symposia is way of us doing so.

The symposia are edited by Dr Clair Gammage, School of Law, University of Bristol and Dr Amaka Vanni, Independent Scholar and President-Elect, African International Economic Law Network (AfIELN)

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Symposium 1: Global South Perspectives for Pluralising and Decolonising International Economic Law

Published by AfronomicsLaw

This symposium draws together an exciting array of contributions on the history of IEL and origins of IEL theory alongside context specific examples marking out the intersections between IEL, business and human rights. This symposium offers diverse perspectives and timely contributions to the ongoing debate on the need to decolonise and pluralize IEL research and scholarship as a counterpoint to western-centric IEL imagination and teaching. Within this symposium are contributions on the history of IEL and origins of IEL theory alongside context specific examples marking out the intersections between IEL, business and human rights.

  1. Amaka Vanni and Clair Gammage: Symposium Introduction: Global South Perspectives for Pluralising and Decolonising International Economic Law
  2. Michael Fakhri: International Law Started with the Haitian Revolution
  3. Jean Ho: Hustling in International Economic Law
  4. Claiton Fyock: International Investment Law and Constraining Narratives of ‘Development’: ‘Economic Development’ in the Definition of Investment
  5. Flávia do Amaral Vieira: Corporations in Latin America: Human Rights in Dispute
  6. Federico Suárez Ricaurte: Public Interest Captured by Foreign Investment: The Cerrejon Coal Mine in Colombia
  7. Jimena Sierra: Colombia before the ISDS and the Disputes over Natural Resources in a Coloniality Context
  8. Maria Jose Luque Macias: Using the Duty to Regulate Paradigm as a Normative Instrument to Foster Inter-Disciplinarity in the International Investment Law and HumanRrights Debate

We would like to thank AfronomicsLaw editors Olabisi Akinkugbe, James Gathii, Nthope Mapefane and Titilayo Adebola for their support in publishing this symposium.

Symposium 2: Disrupting Narratives on International Economic Law: Theory, Pedagogy and Practice

Published by University of Bristol Law School Blog

In this symposium our contributors use diverse theoretical and methodological approaches to invert dominant normative frameworks and understandings of IEL. It is split into two parts with the first three posts examining how critical approaches to IEL can provide a new frame for analysis, interrogation and critique of embedded structures of hegemony, inequality, and subjugation perpetuated by actors in international investment and international trade law. In the second part of the symposium, our contributors explore how we can ‘know and do IEL’ differently using epistemologies from the globalsSouth and alternative methodologies.

  1. Clair Gammage and Amaka Vanni: The IEL Collective Symposium II: Disrupting Narratives on International Economic Law: Theory, Pedagogy and Practice
  2. Paolo Vargiu: Looking at Investment Arbitration through with Roland Barthes' Eyes
  3. Edoardo Stoppioni: A Neo-Gramscian Analysis of the Neoliberal Discourse of the WTO Judge
  4. Lorenzo Cotula: Global Resource Governance and IEL: Can Human Rights Advance Social Justice?
  5. Yentyl Williams: 'Doing and Knowing' IEL through the Lens of Caribbean Rastafarian Philosophy
  6. Suzzie Onyeka Oyakhire: Teaching IEL in the Era of Decolonisation: Reflections of a Nigerian Lecturer
  7. Amanda Perry-Kessaris: Making Unity From and For Diversity: The IEL Pop-Up Collection (coming soon)

We would like to thank Lee McConnell and all at the University of Bristol Law School Blog for their support in publishing this symposium.

Symposium 3: Rethinking International Economic Law for Sustainable Development

Published by AfronomicsLaw

The focus of the final symposium is on IEL and (sustainable) development. In this symposium our contributors address a range of issues that reveal the complexities, challenges, and constraints of existing legal norms and principles that are designed to contribute to the attainment of (sustainable) development. Our contributors identify regulatory gaps that create disconnects between legal and other forms of governance and explore the role that IEL can play in overcoming the extant limitations of inadequate regulatory regimes.

  1. Clair Gammage and Amaka Vanni:The IEL Collective Symposium III: Reimagining International Economic Law for Sustainable Development
  2. Donatella Alessandrini: Value Chain Trade: A New Dawn for 'Development'?
  3. Regis Simo: African Continental Economic Integration and the Multilateral Trading System: Questioning the Reliance on Differential Treatment
  4. Lyla Latif: African Continental Economic Integration and the Multilateral Trading System: Questioning the Reliance on Differential Treatment
  5. Andria Naude Fourié: Development Projects as Delivery Vehicles for Realizing the Sustainable Development Goals: A Need for Developing Deeper Insights
  6. Alexander Stingl: A Lawyer’s Game, A Biologist’s Game, A Governance Game: How to Conduct Research on the Emerging Bioeconomy in International and Transnational Law?
  7. Feja Lesniewska and Katrien Steenmans: Circular Economy: A Concept to Eliminate & 'Rubbish Law'?

We would like to thank AfronomicsLaw editors Olabisi Akinkugbe, James Gathii, Nthope Mapefane and Titilayo Adebola for their support in publishing this symposium.

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Amanda Perry-Kessaris

Emily Jones