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Understanding the Unknown Soldiers

Fri 09 November 2018

The first tombs of the Unknown Warrior or Soldier were created in the wake of the Great War. It started in France and Britain in 1920 and was soon taken up in other European countries and the United States of America. Professor Christoph Mick, from the University of Warwick’s Department of History, examines the story of the Tombs of the Unknown Soldiers.

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From Munitionettes to Citizens – Women in 1918

Tue 06 November 2018

The experience of the Great War helped to radically change notions of citizenship in Britain. 100 years after the end of the First World War, Dr Sarah Richardson from the Department of History at the University of Warwick, examines how life changed for British women after 1918.

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Five things you need to know about the Peterloo Massacre

Wed 31 October 2018

In August 1819, 600,000 people marched peacefully to St Peters Field in central Manchester to hear a speech about electoral reform. The orator, Henry Hunt, addressed the crowd at 2pm – twenty minutes later eighteen were dead and more than six hundred injured. Here’s five things you should know...

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Shakespeare's View of the World

Thu 26 April 2018

Even 402 years after his death, Shakespeare still has much to say on modern issues. Stuart Elden is Professor of Political Theory and Geography at the University of Warwick and is using Shakespeare’s works to further the understanding of one evergreen issue in human geography: Territory.

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What is Love?

Wed 14 February 2018

On St Valentine’s Day, modern tradition dictates that we really ought to treat our loved one to a romantic meal, a bunch of flowers or watch a ‘rom-com’. At the very least we should buy a card. But that is modern tradition. What was love before it became a supermarket meal deal for two?

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