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December 2018

Name Description Keywords
A normal street in VR A normal street in VR VR
Christmas Day Rituals Card Christmas Day Rituals Card Christmas
Cutting the trees DNA Cutting the trees DNA in VR VR
Davide Piaggio at the WHO Global Forum on Medical Devices in India
Davide Piaggio, Dr Leandro Pecchia and Carlo Federici
Devon Allcoat, using the VR headset Devon Allcoat, using the VR headset VR
Dr Leandro Pecchia, with Carlo Frederici and Davide Piaggio
Dr Mohan TC inspecting plants, University of Warwick
Dr Mohan TC, outside the Phytobiology centre, University of Warwick
Dr Mohan TC, with Barley plants, University of Warwick
Dr Mohan TC, with Barley plants, University of Warwick
EUTOPIA signing Signing of the EUTOPIA alliance, between the University of Warwick, L’Université Paris Seine, and Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and the University of Ljubljana University of Warwick, partnership, universities, Europe
EUTOPIA signing Signing of the EUTOPIA alliance, between the University of Warwick, L’Université Paris Seine, and Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and the University of Ljubljana University of Warwick, partnership, universities, Europe
EUTOPIA signing Signing of the EUTOPIA alliance, between the University of Warwick, L’Université Paris Seine, and Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and the University of Ljubljana University of Warwick, partnership, universities, Europe
Glowing trees in the streets! Trees in the street glowing in VR VR
How you could make a self-lighting tree guide A guide on how you could make a self-lighting Christmas tree. tree VR
Inserting the synthetic firefly DNA Inserting the synthetic firefly DNA in VR
Maize. Credit: Flaviane Malaquias Costa Maize varieties conserved by indigenous Guarani Kaiowá, in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. This indigenous group believe that the Guarani Kaiowá were born from the “Saboró Branco” maize variety Avati Moroti. This variety is considered sacred and it is used in the “Baptism of the maize” ritual, which enshrines the fertility and protection of the crop. The photo was taken in July 2017 during a collection expedition led by Flaviane Malaquias Costa, a collaborator on this study, for a separate research project about maize biodiversity. Kistler’s team reconstructed maize’s evolutionary history by undertaking a genetic comparison of more than 100 varieties of modern maize that grow throughout the Americas, including 40 newly sequenced varieties —many from the eastern low lands of South America, which had been underrepresented in previous studies. Many of the varieties of maize studied were collected in collaboration with indigenous and traditional farmers over the past 60 years and are curated in the genebank at Embrapa, the Brazilian government’s agriculture enterprise.
Maize. Credit: Natália Carolina de Almeida Silva Varieties of the Avati ete’i, the sacred Guaranis maize, April 2017 during the seed exchange fair, in La Paloma, State of Rocha, Uruguay. Although the team used maize curated in gene banks for this study, Fabio Freitas, an ethnobotanist and farm conservationist at Embrapa, said that his work conserving traditional cultivated plants with indigenous groups from the South border of the Amazon forest helped guide the discussion of how maize diffusion may have played out in the past. The team mapped out the genetic relationships between the plants and discovered several distinct lineages, each with its own degree of similarity to their= shared ancestor, teosinte. In other words, Kistler explained, the final stages of maize’s domestication happened more than once in more than one place.
Maize. credit: Fabio de Oliveira Freita Varieties of maize found near Cuscu and Machu Pichu at Salineras de Maras on the Inca Sacred Valley in Peru, June 2007. The history of maize begins with its wild ancestor, teosinte. Teosinte bears little resemblance to the corn eaten today: Its cobs are tiny and its few kernels are protected by a nearly impenetrable outer casing. In fact, Kistler said, it is not clear why people bothered with it all. Over time, however, as early farmers selected for desirable traits, the descendant of the wild plant developed larger cobs and more tender, plentiful kernels, eventually becoming the staple crop that maize is today. The newly published study in the journal Science shows that the final stages of maize’s domestication happened more than once in more than one place, revising the history of one of the world’s most important crops.
Maize. credit: Fabio de Oliveira Freitas Varieties of maize found near Cuscu and Machu Pichu at Salineras de Maras on the Inca Sacred Valley in Peru, June 2007. The history of maize begins with its wild ancestor, teosinte. Teosinte bears little resemblance to the corn eaten today: Its cobs are tiny and its few kernels are protected by a nearly impenetrable outer casing. In fact, Kistler said, it is not clear why people bothered with it all. Over time, however, as early farmers selected for desirable traits, the descendant of the wild plant developed larger cobs and more tender, plentiful kernels, eventually becoming the staple crop that maize is today. The newly published study in the journal Science shows that the final stages of maize’s domestication happened more than once in more than one place, revising the history of one of the world’s most important crops.
Marking where to cut tree DNA Marking where to cut the tree DNA in VR VR
Professor Lord Bhattacharyya Professor Lord Bhattacharyya, WMG, standing in front of the National Automotive Innovation Centre University of Warwick, National Automotive Innovation Centre, Building, campus, Professor Lord Kumar Bhattacharyya, wmg
Professor Lord Bhattacharyya Professor Lord Bhattacharyya, WMG, standing in front of the National Automotive Innovation Centre University of Warwick, National Automotive Innovation Centre, Building, campus, Professor Lord Kumar Bhattacharyya, wmg
Self-lighting Christmas Tree Cartoon Self-lighting Christmas Tree Cartoon VR christmas
Testing DNA of Maize at the University of Warwick Kistler preparing ancient DNA samples for analysis at the University of Warwick in 2016. As curator of archaeogenomics and archaeobotany at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, Kistler uses cutting-edge genomic and genetic research techniques to understand the evolutionary relationship between people and plants. “It’s the long-term evolutionary history of domesticated plants that makes them fit for the human environment today, Kistler said. “Understanding that history gives us tools for assessing the future of corn as we continue to drastically reshape our global environment and increase our agricultural demands on land around the globe.”
The WHO Global Forum on Medical Devices in India
The separated DNA The separated tree DNA in VR VR
VR (Virtual Reality) headset VR (Virtual Reality) headset vr
View from an orbiting planet. This image is free for use if used in direct connection with this story but image copyright and credit must be University of Warwick/Mark Garlick. View from an orbiting planet. This image is free for use if used in direct connection with this story but image copyright and credit must be University of Warwick/Mark Garlick.
View of the double star system and surrounding disc. This image is free for use if used in direct connection with this story but image copyright and credit must be University of Warwick/Mark Garlick. View of the double star system and surrounding disc. This image is free for use if used in direct connection with this story but image copyright and credit must be University of Warwick/Mark Garlick.
Welding the synthetic firefly DNA Welding the synthetic Firefly DNA into the tree DNA in VR VR

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