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Heavy rain affects object detection by autonomous vehicle LiDAR sensors

All high-level AVs rely heavily on sensors, and in the paper, ‘Realistic LiDAR with Noise Model for Real-Tim Testing of Automated Vehicles in a Virtual Environment’, published in the IEEE Sensors Journal, researchers from the Intelligent Vehicles Group at WMG, University of Warwick have specifically simulated and evaluated the performance of LiDAR sensors in rain.

Thu 25 Feb 2021, 11:37 | Tags: automotive, WMG, autonomous vehicles, LiDAR, Sciences

Human rights law can provide a transparent and fair framework for vaccine allocations, researchers suggest.

As Governments around the world wrestle with the question of designing a fair system to allocate their COVID-19 vaccine supplies for maximum protection against the pandemic, a team of researchers led by Dr Sharifah Sekalala of Warwick Law School propose that existing human rights legal principles should guide their thinking and outline a model of an ethical intersectional distribution scheme based on human rights legal principles.

Thu 25 Feb 2021, 11:04

The three key actions to secure supply chain resilience after Brexit and COVID

Brexit and COVID were two major disruptions to manufacturers’ supply chains, however, a consortium of academic and industry partners including WMG, University of Warwick has identified key ways to build supply chain resilience.

Tue 23 Feb 2021, 10:59 | Tags: supply chains, WMG, Business, Sciences

University of Warwick scientists set to tackle big data challenge of next-generation physics experiments

Physicists at the University of Warwick are among scientists developing vital software to exploit the large data sets collected by the next-generation experiments in high energy physics (HEP), predominantly those at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

Mon 22 Feb 2021, 11:05 | Tags: Physics, CERN, research

Covid-19: Future targets for treatments rapidly identified with new computer simulations

Researchers have detailed a mechanism in the distinctive corona of Covid-19 that could help scientists to rapidly find new treatments for the virus, and quickly test whether existing treatments are likely to work with mutated versions as they develop.

Fri 19 Feb 2021, 10:13 | Tags: Physics, research, COVID-19

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