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MSc MAS

The taught part of the masters degree involved studying a wide range of analytical scientific techniques, including microscopy, NMR, and mass spectrometry, along with techniques for quantitative analysis, statistics for data analysis, and mathematical modelling. My research interests lie in electrochemistry, so for the research part of the masters degree I undertook two mini research projects in the Warwick Electrochemistry and Interfaces Group.

Mini Projects

A New Analytical Approach to Detecting Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in DNA using Boron Doped Diamond Laser Heated Electrodes, Prof. Julie V. Macpherson

The aim of this project was to develop a strategy to covalently tether DNA molecules, which have been tagged with a redox mediator, to the surface of a gold electrode and identify an electrochemical response.

The conclusions of the project were:

  • An electrochemical response can be detected from a gold electrode modified with a self assembled monolayer of a short chain redox mediator.
  • An electrochemical response can be detected from a gold electrode modified with short chain double stranded DNA attached using a variation of the SAM method.

(PDF Document) Technical Report and Poster

"No sweat!": Development of an in-vitro model for antiperspirants, Prof. Pat Unwin

The aim of the project was to develop a new laboratory based testing system for antiperspirants, based on the use of a micropipette to mimic a sweat gland. The feasibility of using this system to evaluate the efficacy of antiperspirants was investigated and a finite element method model was constructed to simulate the process.

The conclusions of the project were:

  • Results were too variable to draw firm conclusions on differences between antiperspirants.
  • Some insight was gained into the effect of sweat flow rate on diffusion of antiperspirant into the sweat pore, and the 'gelation' method of unblocking sweat pores afterwards.
  • A model was created based on fluid flow through a channel and diffusion of external species into the channel.

(PDF Document) Research Paper and Supporting Information