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Nicholas Gane

Professor of Sociology

Email: n.gane@warwick.ac.uk
Room: E.0.11

Tel: +44(0)24 765 73415
Fax: +44(0)24 765 23497

Advice and Feedback:

Nicholas is on academic study leave for the academic year 2019/20.

 

 

 

Profile

Nicholas Gane joined the Department of Sociology at the University of Warwick in October 2013 from the University of York. He worked previously at Brunel University and Goldsmiths College. He directed the ESRC Warwick Doctoral Training Centre and the Midlands Graduate School Doctoral Training Partnership from 2016-19.

Nicholas is a board member of the journal Theory, Culture and Society, and edited the Theory, Culture and Society Annual Review from 2006 to 2009. He was a board member of the journal Sociology from 2004-06 and 2015-17.

Research

I have written two monographs on Max Weber that seek to develop theoretical resources for thinking critically about contemporary capitalist culture and society: Max Weber and Postmodern Theory (Palgrave, 2002) and Max Weber and Contemporary Capitalism (Palgrave, 2012). I have also published a collection of interviews with leading social and cultural theorists under the title The Future of Social Theory (Continuum, 2004) that addresses different aspects of the capitalist present, including: cosmopolitanism, (post)colonialism, complexity, mobility, and the information order.

More recently, my research has addressed the sociological history of neoliberalism. For a publication in this area that uses the work of Foucault to address the different governmentalities of liberalism and neoliberalism, see http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-954X.2012.02126.x/abstract You can hear me speaking about the history of neoliberalism at: http://estudiosdelaeconomia.wordpress.com/2014/09/14/is-neoliberalism-weberian-an-interview-with-nicholas-gane/ As part of this work on neoliberalism, I have addressed various aspects of debt, banking and finance. This includes work on sovereign debt and on usury (see, for example: 'Central Banking, Technocratic Governance and the Financial Crisis'. Sosiologia, 52, 4, 2015, pp.381-96, which is available here: https://www.academia.edu/19658356/Central_Banking_Technocratic_Governance_and_the_Financial_Crisis My current research, which is still in its early stages, centres on the history and power of corporations.

Finally, I have a concern for current debates over the theoretical and methodological ‘crises’ of the discipline of sociology. I have used the writings of C. Wright Mills to reflect upon the promise and craft of sociology today, see: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-954X.2012.02054.x/abstract and (with Les Back) http://tcs.sagepub.com/content/29/7-8/399.abstract More recently, I have questioned the value of a 'descriptive turn' across the social sciences, see: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/1468-4446.12715

Teaching

Nicholas is on academic study leave for the academic year 2019/20.

PhD Supervision

I welcome applications in the following areas: social and cultural theory; economic sociology; the sociology of markets; the sociological analysis of neoliberalism; the history of sociology; the sociology of debt, finance and banking.

I currently supervise the following PhD students:

Daniel Wood, Becoming-Vitalist: A Political History of Sociological Vitalism.

Felipe Figueroa Zimmermann, The Concept of Ownership in the Age of Intellecual Property.

Simon Arthur, The Role of Central Banking in England since 1997.

Sophie Wootton, A Crisis of European Proportions: Brexit, the Decline of Neoliberalism and Resurrection of Class.

Alan Barrett-Evans, The Disorders of Contemporary Capitalism.

Key Publications

(for a full list see http://wrap.warwick.ac.uk/view/author_id/31584.html)

Books
Recent Journal Articles and Book Chapters