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SNLS Essay Prize

Submissions for the SNLS Early-Career Essay Prize 2018 are now invited.

All PhD students and post-doctoral researchers up to two years after their viva by the deadline (who are SNLS members) are eligible to submit an essay of up to 7,000 words (e.g. part of a chapter or a draft of an article or a written version of a conference paper) by 1 October 2018 (as an email attachment to Gesine Manuwald). The word count includes footnotes, but excludes title, bibliography and any appendixes (which, however, should not be longer than the text of the essay). The name of the author, their affiliation and their role (e.g. final-year PhD student) as well as the word count should be indicated on the title page. Candidates can enter in every year in which they are eligible, but they may not submit the same essay twice.


SNLS is particularly looking for contributions discussing less well-known Neo-Latin texts and providing close reading of these and / or discussions of context at a high scholarly level in terms of both contents and presentation. All submissions will be judged by members of the Executive Committee, who may ask other experts to join them. Candidates will be informed of the outcome by email within a month of the submission date. The winner will be announced officially at the AGM in November and will receive a certificate, a small financial award and publication advice if required.


  • The 2017 SNLS Early-Career Essay Prize was awarded to Bianca Facchini, for her essay, 'In Praise of a Martial Lord: Porcelio Pandone's Feltria Between Panegyric and Scepticism'.
  • The 2016 SNLS Early-Career Essay Prize was awarded to Caroline Spearing, for her essay, 'Tangled Thickets and Sacred Groves. Virgil and Lucan in Book 6 of Abraham Cowley’s Plantarum Libri Sex (1668)'.
  • The inaugural SNLS Early-Career Essay Prize (2015) was awarded to Bernhard Schirg (Freie Universität Berlin). His prize-winning essay entitled ‘The rebel residing in Cortese’s ideal palace. Splendor and magnificence in Cardinal Bernardino de Carvajal's (1456–1523) residence in the (lost) Palazzo Millini’ will be published in the Journal of the Courtauld and Warburg Institutes.