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Thu, Jan 18, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Professor Vera Kempe, "Talking to Children" Abertay Dundee University: Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Sotaro Kita

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

There is consensus amongst child language development researchers that the way in which caregivers tend to talk to children aids language acquisition. Although childdirected speech does not occur in all cultures, when it does it has been shown to facilitate children’s acquisition of speech sounds and words. I will present findings demonstrating that child-directed speech also helps with learning morphology, before asking the more general question about what mechanisms account for the propensity of caregivers to modify their speech so it meets the needs of child learners. One line of inquiry examines whether such beneficial features arise from positive affect expression. The other line of inquiry examines whether child-directed speech is a form of teaching. I will end with describing a preliminary model that combines deliberate, explicit input enhancement with involuntary, implicit speech adjustment in an attempt to understand the cognitive mechanisms that govern the way in which we talk to children.

Vera Kempe Seminar Speaker 18-1-18

Tue, Jan 23, '18
14:00 - 15:00
Bridges Colloquium (Term 2)
Thu, Jan 25, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Dr Jana Kreppner, “Young adult outcomes following early life institutional deprivation: Findings from the young adult follow-up of the English and Romanian Adoptees Study” University of Southampton: Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Fiona MacCallum

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

“Young adult outcomes following early life institutional deprivation: Findings from the young adult follow-up of the English and Romanian Adoptees Study”

Jana Kreppner, Associate Professor in Developmental Psychopathology, University of Southampton

A central question for developmental psychology concerns the contributions of early experiences to long-term development. While over the last decade evidence has accumulated documenting long-term adverse neurodevelopmental and mental health outcomes for children who experienced extreme early adversity, less is known how these difficulties might continue into later life. In this talk, I will present the latest data from the longitudinal English and Romanian Adoption Study (ERA) which followed children who were raised in the grossly depriving institutions of the Ceaucescu regime during the late 1980s and who were adopted by families living in the U.K.. ERA studied 165 Romanian adoptees who were placed with their adoptive families at varying ages ranging from just a few weeks old up to 42 months of age. Their development is compared with 52 within-UK adoptees who were placed with their families before 6 months of age and who had not suffered maltreatment or neglect. The ERA sample was prospectively followed through childhood, adolescence and into early adulthood. The study has shown that there was a devastating initial impact of early deprivation on development for nearly all adoptees followed by a remarkable degree of catch-up for many. However, about half of the children who spent more than the first 6 months of their lives in institutions continued to suffer significant developmental difficulties right through to adolescence. I will present our recent findings showing considerable persistence into adulthood of elevated rates of inattention and overactivity, disinhibited social behaviour, and autistic features. Interestingly, there was remission in rates with cognitive impairment from childhood to adulthood. The findings will be discussed in terms of the compelling evidence that time-limited exposure to severe early adversity can have a profound and lasting psychological impact despite subsequent change to a much better, caring and supportive rearing environment.

Jana Kreppner 25 Jan 2018

Mon, Jan 29, '18
11:30 - 13:30
Director of Student Experience and Progression (DSEP) presentations - Monday 29 January 2018
OC1.07

This event can be attended by staff, UG and PG students, but please sign up using the on-line form:

Attendance form

Tue, Jan 30, '18
14:00 - 15:00
Bridges Colloquium (Term 2)
Thu, Feb 1, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Dr Viv Vignoles, "Cross-cultural generality of identity motives" Univesity of Sussex: Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Robin Goodwin

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Cross-cultural generality of identity motives

 Dr Vivian L Vignoles Reader in Social Psychology, University of Sussex

Beyond basic needs for food, water, affiliation and security, people’s thoughts and actions are often guided by psychological needs; these include identity motives—motives to see oneself in particular ways—which influence psychological functioning and social action. People in contemporary “Western”, individualistic societies are motivated to see themselves positively (self-esteem), as distinguished from others (distinctiveness), persisting through time (continuity), accepted by others (belonging), competent and capable (efficacy), and their existence as mattering (meaning). However, little has been known about the relevance or otherwise of these motives to people living in “non-Western” societies—most of the world’s population—and psychologists have disagreed about whether these motives are universal or culturally specific/relative. With members of the Culture and Identity Research Network, I conducted two surveys measuring strengths of identity motives, sources of motive satisfaction, and cultural beliefs and values, among approximately 10,000 student and adult members of cultural groupings spanning 35 nations on all inhabited continents. Multilevel analyses of cross-sectional and longitudinal data supported a predicted middle way between universalism and relativism: Supporting universalism, the six identity motives showed a relatively similar pattern of effects on identity construction across cultural groups with widely varying beliefs, values and practices. Supporting relativism, cultural groups showed different characteristic ways of satisfying each of these motives. Thus, a common set of motives appears to underlie the different expressions and outcomes of identity observed across cultures, supporting a view of identity motives as “culturally flexible universals”.

Viv Vignoes 1 February 2018

Tue, Feb 6, '18
14:00 - 15:00
Bridges Colloquium (Term 2)
Thu, Feb 8, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Professor Christine Caldwell, "Experimental approaches to understanding distinctively human culture", University of Stirling: Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Sotaro Kita

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Cultural evolution is widely recognised to be a predominantly human phenomenon. Although there is no shortage of examples of cultural transmission in nonhumans, these are acknowledged to be less diverse in content, and less influential as sources of population-level behavioural change and diversity, compared with human cultural evolution. Most notably, human culture supports the inter-generational accumulation of skills and knowledge, such that later generations can benefit from the experiences of their predecessors. However, it remains unclear how exactly human social transmission supports such a facility, and why we do not seem to see it in other species. In recent years, experimental approaches have enabled valuable progress in elucidating the conditions necessary for cumulative culture in humans. Researchers are now beginning to apply similar methods in studies of nonhumans, and these have provided insights into the extent to which similar phenomena can be elicited in other species. I will discuss contributions made using both of these approaches, as well as unresolved issues, and how these could be addressed with further novel approaches to experimental design.

christine_caldwell.jpg

Tue, Feb 13, '18
13:00 - 14:00
Internal seminar: tba
H5.45

Contact: Jesse Preston

 
14:00 - 15:00
Bridges Colloquium (Term 2)
Tue, Feb 20, '18
14:00 - 15:00
Bridges Colloquium (Term 2)
Thu, Feb 22, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Professor Nichola Rumsey, UWE, Bristol: Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Fiona MacCallum

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Tue, Feb 27, '18
13:00 - 14:00
Internal seminar: tba
H5.45

Contact: Jesse Preston

 
14:00 - 15:00
Bridges Colloquium (Term 2)
Thu, Mar 1, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Dr Dorothea Hämmerer, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL: Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Elizabeth Maylor

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Tue, Mar 6, '18
14:00 - 15:00
Bridges Colloquium (Term 2)
Thu, Mar 8, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Professor Helene Joffe, UCL, "Wellbeing in the City: A Study of the Aspirations of those who Dwell in Britain’s two Largest Cities" Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Robin Goodwin

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Wellbeing in the City: A Study of the Aspirations of those who Dwell in Britain’s two Largest Cities

As cities continue to grow in size and number, and the ‘smart’ agenda becomes increasingly prevalent, what are city dwellers’ priorities for their own futures? Using a novel and naturalistic free association method this study explores what matched samples of adults in Britain’s two largest cities want from cities of the future and for their own futures, the motivations underpinning these aspirations and their link to wellbeing. Thematic analysis of 96 interviews, in which the participants elaborate their free associations, reveals that the aspiration for community is one of three key wishes for cities of the future, and social connectedness is the most prevalent personal aspiration. It includes connection with both ‘strong ties’ and ‘weak ties’. City dwellers’ aspirations for social connection are motivated by a desire to ‘matter’ and are imbued with nostalgia. Based on these findings the paper proposes that wellbeing-enhancing future city design will need to recreate the imagined ideal past in which people connected face-to-face and experienced themselves as mattering to other people.

Helen Joffe 8 March 2018

Tue, Mar 13, '18
13:00 - 14:00
Internal seminar: tba
H5.45

Contact: Jesse Preston

 
14:00 - 15:00
Bridges Colloquium (Term 2)
Thu, Mar 15, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Dr Riikka Mottonen, University of Nottingham "Auditory-motor speech perception: Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Profesor Sotaro Kita

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Riikka Mottonen 15 March 2018

Thu, Apr 26, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Dr Zanna Clay, Durham University: "Natural communication in our great ape relative, the bonobo: Insights into the evolution of language" Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Professor Sotaro Kita

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Natural communication in our great ape relative, the bonobo: Insights into the evolution of language

Our capacity for language is a central aspect of what it means to be human and sets us apart from the rest of the animal kingdom. Given that language does not fossilize, one way to understand how and when it first evolved is to examine the communicative capacities of our closest living relatives, the great apes. In this talk, I will review my recent research that explores natural communication in our least understood but closest living relative, the bonobo (Pan paniscus). I will primarily focus on what natural bonobo communication can tell us about their underlying social awareness and how this relates to the evolution of language. I report findings that highlight considerable communicative complexity, flexibility, and intentionality which, cumulatively, suggest that many of the building blocks for language are deeply rooted in our primate past.

 Zanna Clay 26-4-18

Tue, May 1, '18
13:00 - 14:00
Internal seminar: tba
H5.45

Contact: Jesse Preston

Thu, May 3, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Speaker tba: Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Thu, May 10, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Speaker Dr Miguel Farias, Mindfulness and Meditation, Coventry University, Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Kim Wade

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Dr Miguel Farias, Seminar speaker 10-5-18

Tue, May 15, '18
13:00 - 14:00
Internal seminar: tba
H5.45

Contact: Jesse Preston

Tue, May 29, '18
13:00 - 14:00
Internal seminar: tba
H5.45

Contact: Jesse Preston