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Thu, Feb 22, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Professor Nichola Rumsey:“I Don’t Like the Way I Look”: Using strategic partnerships to scale-up research and interventions to tackle a pressing social issue. Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Fiona MacCallum

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

“I Don’t Like the Way I Look”: Using strategic partnerships to scale-up research and interventions to tackle a pressing social issue.  

Interest in ‘looks’ has a long history, but in current society the emphasis on physical appearance is particularly marked. In response to unrelenting pressure messages from various forms of media, advertising and from prevailing social norms, for many, the value placed on outward appearance has become disproportionate to other aspects of self-esteem and self-worth. The prevalence of dissatisfaction and anxiety about appearance is considerable, and research demonstrates a raft of negative impacts for young people and adults in key areas of living, including psychological wellbeing, physical health, educational, occupational and social functioning. A key challenge for interventionists in this field is to find ways of ameliorating and in the longer term, preventing the associated distress at scale. This talk will describe the development of two key strategic partnerships, one with health care professionals across the UK and the second with a key commercial supplier of cosmetic products, to illustrate current efforts to tackle this pressing social issue. 

 

Nichola Rumsey PhD OBE

Professor Emerita

Centre for Appearance Research,

UWE, Bristol 

Nichola Rumsey - 22 Feb 2018

Tue, Feb 27, '18
13:00 - 14:00
Internal seminar: Konstantinos Mantantzis
H5.45

Contact: Jesse Preston

Psychobiology of Emotion-Cognition Interactions in Ageing

Konstantinos Mantantzis, Friederike Schlaghecken, Elizabeth A. Maylor

 

Despite the physical and cognitive changes that accompany normal ageing, older adults appear to be well-adjusted and emotionally resilient throughout the ageing process. Older adults’ preference for positive experiences and emotional stability extends to a range of cognitive domains and emerges as a cognitive bias towards the processing of positive over negative information (‘Positivity Effect’). We investigated the psychobiological aspect of this phenomenon and, more specifically, the contribution of peripheral physiological mechanisms (e.g., energy availability and cardiovascular functioning) in the emergence of older adults’ positivity preference and positive emotionality. Our results point to an intricate relationship between physiological processes and emotion-cognition interactions in ageing, and highlight the importance of examining the synergy between these components when investigating age-related changes in cognition and emotionality.

 

ALL WELCOME!

 
14:00 - 15:00
Bridges Colloquium (Term 2)
Thu, Mar 1, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Dr Dorothea Hämmerer, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL: Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Elizabeth Maylor

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Using pupillometry and structural imaging to probe the ageing noradrenergic system

Neuronal loss in noradrenergic (NA) structures of the brain stem (Locus Coeruleus, LC) during ageing is comparable to neuronal loss in dopaminergic nuclei. Animal and pharmacological studies show that noradrenergic modulation supports a wide range of higher cognitive functions, including memory encoding, selective attention, and cognitive flexibility. However, we don’t know yet to what extent altered LC function or altered NA modulation impacts cognitive function in ageing. I present results from three studies which investigate the relevance of age differences in LC structure and function for adult age differences in emotional memory and decision making, using structural imaging and pupillometry (pupil dilation can serve as a proxy measure for functional LC responses). Pupillometric data indicate an altered responsiveness of the ageing NA system during memory encoding and decision making. Structural LC measures suggest a likely impact of reduced LC integrity on memory performance in ageing.

Dorothea Hammerer 1-3-18

 

Tue, Mar 6, '18
14:00 - 15:00
Bridges Colloquium (Term 2)
Thu, Mar 8, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Professor Helene Joffe, UCL, "Wellbeing in the City: A Study of the Aspirations of those who Dwell in Britain’s two Largest Cities" Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Robin Goodwin

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Wellbeing in the City: A Study of the Aspirations of those who Dwell in Britain’s two Largest Cities

As cities continue to grow in size and number, and the ‘smart’ agenda becomes increasingly prevalent, what are city dwellers’ priorities for their own futures? Using a novel and naturalistic free association method this study explores what matched samples of adults in Britain’s two largest cities want from cities of the future and for their own futures, the motivations underpinning these aspirations and their link to wellbeing. Thematic analysis of 96 interviews, in which the participants elaborate their free associations, reveals that the aspiration for community is one of three key wishes for cities of the future, and social connectedness is the most prevalent personal aspiration. It includes connection with both ‘strong ties’ and ‘weak ties’. City dwellers’ aspirations for social connection are motivated by a desire to ‘matter’ and are imbued with nostalgia. Based on these findings the paper proposes that wellbeing-enhancing future city design will need to recreate the imagined ideal past in which people connected face-to-face and experienced themselves as mattering to other people.

Helene Joffe 2

Tue, Mar 13, '18
13:00 - 14:00
Internal seminar: tba
H5.45

Contact: Jesse Preston

 
14:00 - 15:00
Bridges Colloquium (Term 2)
Thu, Mar 15, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Dr Riikka Mottonen, University of Nottingham "Auditory-motor speech perception": Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Profesor Sotaro Kita

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Riikka Mottonen 15 March 2018

Thu, Apr 26, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Dr Zanna Clay, Durham University: "Natural communication in our great ape relative, the bonobo: Insights into the evolution of language" Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Professor Sotaro Kita

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Natural communication in our great ape relative, the bonobo: Insights into the evolution of language

Our capacity for language is a central aspect of what it means to be human and sets us apart from the rest of the animal kingdom. Given that language does not fossilize, one way to understand how and when it first evolved is to examine the communicative capacities of our closest living relatives, the great apes. In this talk, I will review my recent research that explores natural communication in our least understood but closest living relative, the bonobo (Pan paniscus). I will primarily focus on what natural bonobo communication can tell us about their underlying social awareness and how this relates to the evolution of language. I report findings that highlight considerable communicative complexity, flexibility, and intentionality which, cumulatively, suggest that many of the building blocks for language are deeply rooted in our primate past.

 Zanna Clay 26-4-18

Tue, May 1, '18
13:00 - 14:00
Internal seminar: tba
H5.45

Contact: Jesse Preston

Thu, May 3, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Speaker tba: Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Thu, May 10, '18
16:00 - 17:30
Speaker Dr Miguel Farias, Mindfulness and Meditation, Coventry University, Departmental Seminar Series 2017/18
H1.48

Hosted by Jesse Preston (invited by Kim Wade)

Refreshments in Common room at 3.30pm

Dr Miguel Farias, Seminar speaker 10-5-18

Tue, May 15, '18
13:00 - 14:00
Internal seminar: tba
H5.45

Contact: Jesse Preston

Tue, May 29, '18
13:00 - 14:00
Internal seminar: tba
H5.45

Contact: Jesse Preston