Skip to main content Skip to navigation

Calendar of events

Events photo montage banner

Select tags to filter on
  Jump to any date

Search calendar

Enter a search term into the box below to search for all events matching those terms.

Start typing a search term to generate results.

How do I use this calendar?

You can click on an event to display further information about it.

The toolbar above the calendar has buttons to view different events. Use the left and right arrow icons to view events in the past and future. The button inbetween returns you to today's view. The button to the right of this shows a mini-calendar to let you quickly jump to any date.

The dropdown box on the right allows you to see a different view of the calendar, such as an agenda or a termly view.

If this calendar has tags, you can use the labelled checkboxes at the top of the page to select just the tags you wish to view, and then click "Show selected". The calendar will be redisplayed with just the events related to these tags, making it easier to find what you're looking for.

 
Wed 29 May, '24
-
Language and Learning Seminar: Title TBC - Yağmur Deniz Kısa, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Microsoft Teams

Speaker: Yağmur Deniz Kısa, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Title: A communicative account of gesturing when speaking is difficult

Abstract: People gesture when they speak, especially when speaking is difficult. Why? According to an influential answer to this question, people gesture when speaking is difficult because gestures facilitate speech production – serving a cognitive function for the speaker. In Study 1, we aim to conceptually replicate the finding that preventing gestures makes speakers more disfluent – the primary finding that has been interpreted as evidence for this influential hypothesis. Contrary to long-held beliefs, we show that there is, in fact, no support for the claim that preventing gestures impairs speaking – in a large dataset and re-examining five decades of empirical evidence cited for this claim. If gestures do not help speech production, why then are people more likely to gesture when speaking is difficult? To answer this question, we propose and test an alternative explanation. Gesturing when speaking is difficult may not be a mere symptom of speaking difficulties. And gesturing may not be produced to help speakers resolve these difficulties, either. Instead, gesturing when speaking is difficult may be communicatively motivated. In Study 2, we show that speakers are more likely to gesture when they are disfluent because gestures serve as a pragmatic signal to the listener commenting on experiencing problems with speaking. When gestures were not visible and therefore could not serve as a pragmatic signal to the listener, they were not more likely to occur during disfluent speech than fluent speech. Together, these studies motivate a revision to theories of why people gesture. People gesture when speaking is difficult, because gestures provide a communicative signal to the listener, commenting on the process of speaking.

Speaker’s Bio

Yağmur Deniz Kısa completed her Psychology and Philosophy in Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey. She completed her PhD in Psychology at the University of Chicago under the supervision of Daniel Casasanto and Susan Goldin-Meadow, with a dissertation on why people gesture when they speak. Since Summer 2022, she has been a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in the Comparative Cultural Psychology department, working on how culture shapes spatial thinking.

Email Mingtong Li for a Teams Link.

Wed 5 Jun, '24
-
Language and Learning Seminar: Title TBC - Dr Gabriel Jorgewich-Cohen, University of Zurich
Microsoft Teams

Speaker: Dr Gabriel Jorgewich-Cohen, University of Zurich

Title: TBC

Abstract: TBC

Email Mingtong Li for a Teams Link.

Fri 7 Jun, '24
-
Guest Speaker: From Identification to Intervention: Early Support for Preschoolers with ASD - Dr Kathy Shum, University of Hong Kong
H0.44 - Humanities Building

Speaker: Dr Kathy Shum, University of Hong Kong

Dr. Kathy Kar-man SHUM

Wed 12 Jun, '24
-
Language and Learning Seminar: Title TBC - Dr Yngwie Asbjørn Nielsen, Aarhus University
Microsoft Teams

Speaker: Dr Yngwie Asbjørn Nielsen, Aarhus University

Title: Theory-driven investigations of structural priming in conversations

Abstract

Structural priming—a change in processing observed upon repeated exposure to a linguistic structure—is one of the most studied phenomena in psycholinguistics. Prior research has discovered multiple determinants of structural priming which implicate several features of memory, ranging from the lexical to the semantic and the explicit to the implicit. Five such determinants are the lexical boost, the semantic boost, the inverse preference effect, the persistence of structural priming, and the fast decay of the lexical boost. Although structural priming is known to occur in conversation, there is as yet no thorough understanding of how the five determinants affect priming between interlocutors. In this talk, I present a novel operationalization of the five determinants and test their generalizability to actual conversation. Since the project is in its initial stages (i.e., prior to preregistration), I look forward to critical feedback on the choice and operationalization of the five determinants.

Speaker’s Bio

Yngwie Asbjørn Nielsen is a PhD student at Aarhus University working on structural priming and conversational alignment.

Email Mingtong Li for a Teams Link.

Fri 14 Jun, '24
-
PGR Neurodiversity Day
Scarman

If you have any questions or require further information please contact lauren.wilkinson@warwick.ac.uk

Sign up link here: Neurodiversity and PGR Conference (warwick.ac.uk)

Wed 19 Jun, '24
-
Language and Learning Seminar: Title TBC - Dr Franziska Wegdell, University of Zurich
Microsoft Teams

Speaker: Dr Franziska Wegdell, University of Zurich

Title: TBC

Abstract: TBC

Email Mingtong Li for a Teams Link.

Fri 21 Jun, '24
-
Guest Speaker: Replication, replication, replication: Psychology’s open secret from its closed era of research. - Dr. Tim Rakow, King's College
H0.44 - Humanities Building

Speaker: Dr. Tim Rakow, King's College

TMitchell_140908_8141 copy

Thu 4 Jul, '24
-
Guest Speaker: Title TBC - Pro. Vincent Reid, The University of Waikato
TBC

Speaker: Pro. Vincent Reid, The University of Waikato

Photo of Professor Vincent Reid

Tue 29 Oct, '24
-
The 2nd International Conference on Natural Products and Chronic Diseases 2024
The conference held Hybrid via Zoom Meeting and Offline at Auditorium Universitas Nasional, Jakarta.

Introduction

The 2nd International Conference on Natural Products and Chronic Diseases 2024 aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers, and research scientists to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Natural Products and Chronic Diseases. The premier interdisciplinary forum for researchers, practitioners, and educators to present and discuss the latest innovations, trends, and concerns as well as the practical challenges faced and solutions adopted in the field of Natural Products and Chronic Diseases.

Conference Theme

Natural Products for Quality of Life towards Achieving Sustainable Development Goals

Organizers

The organizers of this activity are the Universitas Nasional, Universitas Pancasila, Universitas Sriwijaya, and The Center for Botanicals and Chronic Diseases (CBCD) School of Environmental and Biological Sciences - Rutgers University.

Time: Thursday-Wednesday, October 29th-30th, 2024. 08:00 AM West Indonesia Time (1:00am UK Time). Sessions to be pre-recorded (TBC).

Registration Link

https://bit.ly/Register-ICNatCro

For more information, please contact Dr Ani Permana.

Placeholder