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next Research Seminar - Wednesday 27th January 12pm

Our next research seminar is coming up on Wednesday 27th January at 12pm. We have two really interesting papers from Michael and Mengyao. All staff and postgraduate students are warmly invited to join so please feel free to share widely.

Paper 1: Dr Michael Wyness (Reader, DES) will be presenting 'Challenges to the bi-nuclear family: inter-generational relations and children as mediators'.

Paper 2: Mengyao Zhang (PGR, DES) will present a paper titled 'Benefits of children's participation in China: building up children's courage to express'.

Mon 18 Jan 2021, 11:59 | Tags: Events, Research, Michael Wyness

How soon could schools reopen? Expert comment from Dr Michael Wyness

The leader of the Association of School and College Leaders has suggested that the earliest that schools could reopen following lockdown is 1 June. Dr Michael Wyness from the University of Warwick Centre for Education Studies has commented on how feasible this is and some of the factors that schools will have to consider when reopening to pupils.

Full article 

Thu 23 Apr 2020, 17:32 | Tags: Research, Faculty of Social Sciences, Michael Wyness

Young person - big responsibility: Young Carers and Covid-19

While Covid-19 and the current lockdown has major implications for all families, it poses particular challenges for young carers and their families, explains Dr Michael Wyness from the University of Warwick’s Centre for Education Studies.

Full article

Thu 23 Apr 2020, 17:16 | Tags: Research, Faculty of Social Sciences, Michael Wyness

Breaking the silence: working with pupil voice in Iranian primary schools

Michael Wyness and Mon Partovi have had their article published online in Educational Review. Read the full article

The paper provides analysis of findings from research on “pupil voice” collected from 88 Iranian pupils within five primary classrooms. No previous research has been carried out in Iran on “pupil voice” emphasising children’s right to a say about different matters in their school lives. Two methods of data collection were applied: a) participant observation where the observer facilitated workshops within each classroom enabling children to reflect on issues that matter to them; b) individual interviews with pupils, teachers and headteachers aimed at gathering information regarding school participants’ insights into their experiences in schools, including the role of teachers, school regulations and pupil voice activities. Our data reports on the preoccupation teachers and children had with our workshop as an alternative pedagogic form in their schools. While both pupils and teachers saw the advantages of a participatory approach to classroom interactions, national, educational and pedagogic cultural factors provided substantial challenges.

Tue 28 Jan 2020, 11:12 | Tags: Publications, Michael Wyness