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Research

Our objective is to engage in innovative research that extends the frontiers of the discipline, contributing to a deeper understanding of how modern economies function, and how they can adapt to future challenges. Our research spans almost all the major sub-fields of economics.

As a Department, we are consistently ranked in the top 30 in the world, and in the top 10 in Europe, for the quality of our research output. For example, we are ranked 20th in the world and 5th in Europe in the most recent Tilburg University ranking of Economics departments, and we are currently 28th in the world, and 6th in Europe, in the most recent QS University Rankings.

In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) to evaluate the research output of UK Universities, Warwick was ranked 4th in the UK, behind only the LSE, UCL and Oxford, on a measure that takes into account both the proportion of faculty submitted and the quality of outputs submitted. In our submission, 45% of our research was rated as 'world -leading' (4*) and a further 51% rated as 'internationally excellent' (3*).

Research in the Department is based in a number of Research Groups, each of which has its own seminar or workshop series. The interests of individual researchers often overlap the Groups; the purpose of the Groups is to allow Department members with similar interests to meet regularly and to support each other's research.

CAGE

Established in 2010 and funded by the ESRC, CAGE conducts policy-driven economics research informed by culture, history and behaviour. We analyse historical and contemporary data to draw out lessons for modern policy.

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CRETA

CRETA coordinates collaborative research in economic theory, its applications and in multi-disciplinary projects with related disciplines such as applied mathematics, biology, philosophy and political science.

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DR@W

An interdisciplinary initiative for researchers at the University interested in experimental and behavioural science with important implications for economics, psychology, management, marketing and statistics.

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EPEC

The European Political Economy Consortium fosters high-quality research in political economy by facilitating exchange among the leading European centres in political economy. It consists of five founding institutions, including Warwick.

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Development and History

Members of the Development and Economic History Research Group combine archival data, lab-in-the-field experiments, randomised controlled trials, text analysis, survey and secondary data along with theoretical tools to study issues in development and economic history.

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Econometrics and Labour

The Econometrics and Labour Research Group covers a wide number of topics within the areas of modern econometric theory and applications, e.g. the econometrics of networks, as well as labour economics, e.g. the economics of education, gender economics, technology and innovation.

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Experimental and Behavioural Economics

The Experimental and Behavioural Economics Research Group draws its membership from economists based at the Warwick Department of Economics who work in the fields of experimental economics, behavioural economics and/or subjective wellbeing (“Happiness Economics”).

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Macroeconomics and International Economics

The Macroeconomics and International Economics Research Group consists of faculty and PhD students and its research work centres around macroeconomics, international finance and international trade.

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Microeconomics

The Microeconomics Research Group works closely with the Centre for Research in Economic Theory and Its Applications (CRETA). Members of the Group work in economic theory, in its applications, and in multidisciplinary projects with areas such as applied mathematics, biology, philosophy and political science.

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Political Economy and Public Economics

The Political Economy and Public Economics Research Group investigates topics from two disciplines which have natural complementarities. Political economy focuses more on the political feasibility of certain policies whereas public economics tries to determine which policies are optimal in every environment.

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Thu 27 Feb, '20
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Labour-Metrics Research Half Day
Scarman House
Thu 27 Feb, '20
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Macro/International Seminar - Leonardo Melosi (FRB Chicago)
S2.79

Organisers: Federico Rossi, Christine Braun & Marta Santamaria

Mon 2 Mar, '20
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Economic History Seminar - Ariell Zimran (Vanderbilt)
S2.79

Title: Like an Ink Blot on Paper: Testing the Diffusion Hypothesis of Mass Migration, Italy 1876-1920.

A PDF is available at http://www.ariellzimran.com/spitzer_zimran_diffusion.pdf

Mon 2 Mar, '20
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Political Economy Seminar - Steve Callandar (Stanford)
S2.79

Organisers: Kirill Pogorelskiy & Helios Herrera

Tue 3 Mar, '20
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CWIP Lunchtime Workshop - Robert Akerlof
S2.79

Title: Narratives and the Economics of the Family

Abstract: We argue that families adopt stories and that different stories give rise to different patterns of behavior. We build a theoretical model, focusing on two common, competing stories, which we term the “protector narrative” and “fulfillment narrative.” Our model makes predictions regarding the bundle of behaviors associated with each of these narratives; it also makes predictions regarding the narratives families will choose to adopt. We show that the protector narrative gives rise to a type of “traditional” family with distinct gender roles: men are breadwinners, are authoritarian towards women and children, and are expected to be “tough”; women avoid work when feasible, and are not expected to be “tough.” Because of role differentiation, it is important to be part of a family. The fulfillment narrative gives rise to a type of “modern” family in which gender roles are less distinct, both men and women work, and marriages are based, to a greater extent, on romantic love.

Organiser: Christopher Roth

Wed 4 Mar, '20
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CAGE-AMES Workshop - Eleonora Alabrese (PhD)
Cowling Room, S2.77

The Work Programme, Benefit Sanctions and Protest Voting (joint with Thiemo Fetzer)

Abstract: The Work Programme (WP) was an EU sponsored active labour market welfare-to-work programme in the UK introduced in June 2011 by the coalition government and affecting around 2 million individuals. Rewarded work programme providers helped welfare claimants finding a job through payment-by-result contracts. The program was radical in both scale and approach, caused a substantial public outcry, and lead to a substantial amount of media coverage questioning its effectiveness. This paper studies the WP and specifically focuses on intended and unintended effects. We exploit exogenous variation due to the random assignment of individual referrals to individual contractors. This generates, at a finer geographic level, excess referrals whereby a contractor has to handle out of chance more cases referred than they expected. This strengthens incentives to “skim the cream”.

We document that excess referrals are strongly and causally associated with a subsequent increase in benefit sanction referrals, which in turn produce financial grievances. We further investigate whether these WP-induced benefit sanctions had an impact on political outcomes and broader social and economic outcomes such as local election support for UKIP, support for Leave, etc. The latter is not unlikely as the Work Programme made the European Union immediately salient for all WP participants as all letters and communication were mandated to be branded with the European Union flag, as it co-financed by the European Union cohesion fund.

Wed 4 Mar, '20
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CRETA Seminar - Filip Matejka (CERGE-EI)
S2.79

Title is Choice Simplification: A Theory of Mental Budgeting and Naive Diversification

http://home.cerge-ei.cz/matejka/choice_simplification.pdf.

Seminar organisers: Sinem Hidir & Costas Cavounidis

Thu 5 Mar, '20
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MTWP (Micro Theory Work in Progress) Workshop - Raghav Molhotra
S2.79

Title Taxation in Groups.

Thu 5 Mar, '20
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Macro/International Seminar - Christian Haefke (NYU Abu Dhabi) - Via SKYPE
S2.79

The title of paper is Long Live the Vacancy

Abstract: We reassess the role of vacancies in a Diamond-Mortensen-Pissarides style search and matching model. Long-lived vacancies and endogenous job separations together with alternating offer bargaining greatly improve the ability of the model to replicate key stylized labor market facts. The model explains not only standard deviations and autocorrelations of labor market variables, but also their dynamic correlations. The model is consistent with a large surplus both on the worker and the firm side, and generates a wage response to productivity shocks that is in line with empirical evidence on the wage dynamics of new matches. With only one shock, the model captures the dynamics of the US labor market from 1951 to 2014 surprisingly well.

Organisers: Federico Rossi, Christine Braun & Marta Santamaria

Mon 9 Mar, '20
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Economic History Workshop - Mohamed Saleh (Toulouse)
S2.79

Organiser: Yannick Dupraz

Mon 9 Mar, '20
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Seminar - Sonia Bhalotra
S2.79

Title to be advised

Mon 9 Mar, '20
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Political Economy Seminar - Alessia Russo
S2.79

Organisers: Kirill Pogorelskiy & Helios Herrera

Tue 10 Mar, '20
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Economics Research Away Half-Day
Radcliffe House

Organiser: Helios Herrera

Wed 11 Mar, '20
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CAGE-AMES Workshop - Amit Chaudhary
Cowling Room, S2.77
Wed 11 Mar, '20
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CRETA Seminar - Annie Liang (Pennsylvania)
S2.79

Title to be advised.

Seminar organisers: Sinem Hidir & Costas Cavounidis

Thu 12 Mar, '20
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Macro/International Seminar - Axel Gottfries (Edinburgh)
S2.79

Organisers: Federico Rossi, Christine Braun & Marta Santamaria

Mon 20 Apr, '20
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Economic History Seminar - Amanda Gregg (Middlebury) - CANCELLED
Tue 21 Apr, '20
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Teaching & Learning Seminar - Cloda Jenkins (UCL) - CANCELLED
Wed 22 Apr, '20
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Econometrics Seminar - Shakeeb Khan (BC) - CANCELLED
Wed 22 Apr, '20
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CRETA Seminar - Michael Mandler (Royal Holloway) - CANCELLED
Thu 23 Apr, '20
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Macro/International Seminar - Pavel Krolikowski (Cleveland FED) - CANCELLED
Mon 27 Apr, '20
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Economic History Seminar - Melanie Meng Xue (NYU Abu Dhabi) - CANCELLED
Tue 28 Apr, '20
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Applied Economics, Econometrics and Public Policy (CAGE) Seminar - Michela Tincani (UCL) - CANCELLED
Wed 29 Apr, '20
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CRETA Seminar - Lucas Siga (NYU Abu Dhabi) - CANCELLED
Thu 30 Apr, '20
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MTWP (Micro Theory Work in Progress) Workshop - Doruk Cetement - CANCELLED
Thu 30 Apr, '20
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Macro/International Seminar - Meredith Startz (Stanford) - CANCELLED
Mon 4 May, '20
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Political Economy Seminar - Roberto Galbiati (Sciences PO) - CANCELLED
Wed 6 May, '20
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Econometrics Seminar - Mattias Cattaneo (Princeton) - CANCELLED
Wed 6 May, '20
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CRETA Seminar - Jay Lu (UCLA) - CANCELLED
Thu 7 May, '20
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Macro/International Seminar - Elisa Giannone (Penn State University) - CANCELLED
computer generated image of planet earth with ripples under it

Research Impact

Our research seeks to generate knowledge that can be used to strengthen economies and benefit societies around the world. From migration and trade to international development and preventing financial crises, we address some of the most pressing issues of our time and provide recommendations to policymakers and other stakeholders.

Our academics collaborate with organisations including the Bank of England, international and local governments, think tanks and NGOs. They are sought-after in public service roles, regularly providing advice to parliamentary committees and serving on government advisory boards.

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Our Working Papers series feature new ideas and research from academics within the Department of Economics.

The vast majority of papers are available online, the earliest of which is from 1975. If a paper is unavailable online, hard copies can be requested free of charge.