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WMA Graduate Research Seminar, 2023/2024

Research seminar run in conjunction with the WMA Research Centre and open to all philosophy postgraduate students.
If you would like to receive email notifications about the seminar, please email h dot lerman at warwick dot ac dot uk
 
In Summer Term the seminar will take place on Wednesdays, weeks 4-7 and 9, at 14:00-16:00, in room S1.39.
 

In preparation for MindGrad we will dedicate the first 3 sessions to 3 papers by Matt Soteriou and the following 2 session to background reading for Lea Salje's talk.

Week 4: Matt Soteriou, ‘Determining the Future’ [pdf]

Week 5: Matt Soteriou, ‘The past made present: Mental time travel in episodic recollection’ [pdf]

Week 6: Matt Soteriou, ‘Waking Up and Being Conscious' [link]

Week 7: Eli Alshanetsky, Articulating a Thought, Introduction [link] and Chapter 2 'A Puzzle' [link]

Week 9: Alex Byrne, 'Knowing that I'm thinking' [link]

 

Previous Seminars

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Wed 2 Nov, '22
-
WMA Graduate Research Seminar
S0.52
Wed 9 Nov, '22
-
WMA Graduate Research Seminar
S0.52
Wed 16 Nov, '22
-
WMA Graduate Research Seminar
S0.52
Sat 19 Nov, '22 - Sun 20 Nov, '22
10am - 5pm
MindGrad 2022
MS.04

Runs from Saturday, November 19 to Sunday, November 20.

Saturday, 19. November

10:00-10:25 Welcome coffee

10:25-10:30 Short Introduction

10:30-11:45 First Session

Asia Chatchaya Sakchatchawan (UCL): Towards a Wrong Face Theory of Shame

Response by Thomas Crowther

15 min Coffee Break

12:00-13:15 Second Session

Lucas Chebib (UCL): Guilt as a Shame Shaped Thing

Response by Johannes Roessler

1 h Lunch

14:15-15:30 Third Session (Keynote)

Lucy O’Brien (UCL): An Introspective Argument for Others’ Minds

Response by Emily Bassett

15 min Coffee Break

15:45-17:00 Fourth Session

Simone Nota (Trinity College Dublin): Overcoming the Absolute: A Dialectical Critique of the Absolute Conception

Response by Naomi Eilan

17:00-18:00 Reception

18:30 Dinner at Radcliffe

Sunday, 20. November

09:30-10:45 First Session

Christopher Joseph An (Edinburgh): Rational Animals? Mammalian Social Play, Second-personal Knowledge, and the Evolution of Normative Guidance

Response by Richard Moore

5 min Short Break

10:50-11:30 Q&A with Mind co-editors Lucy O’Brien and Adrian Moore on submitting papers to journals

15 min Coffee Break

11:45-13:00 Second Session (Keynote)

Adrian Moore (Oxford): Armchair Knowledge: Some Kantian Reflections

Response by Ben Houlton

1 h Lunch

14:00-15:15 Third Session

Zijian Zhu (Oxford): The Modality and Temporality of Anscombean Practical Knowledge

Response by Lucy Campbell

15 min Coffee Break

15:30-16:45 Fourth Session

Oushinar Nath (UCL): Wisdom and KK Failure

Response by Barney Walker

End of the conference

Wed 11 Jan, '23
-
WMA Graduate Research Seminar
S0.52
Tue 17 Jan, '23
-
CRPLA & WMA Seminar: Paul Smith (Warwick History of Art) - Cezanne, perception, autism: (not) putting the pieces together; Comments by Naomi Eilan (Philosophy)
A0.23 (Soc Sci)
Wed 18 Jan, '23
-
Reading Group: 'Afflictions of Mind'
S0.52
Wed 25 Jan, '23
-
WMA Graduate Research Seminar
S0.52
Wed 1 Feb, '23
-
Reading Group: 'Afflictions of Mind'
S0.52

Addiction: 'Responsibility Without Blame for Addiction' by Hanna Pickard

https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/philosophy/research/researchcentres/wma/graduates/afflictionsofmind/

Wed 8 Feb, '23
-
WMA Graduate Research Seminar
S0.52
Fri 17 Feb, '23
-
Autobiographical Memory and Joint Reminiscing
Wolfson Research Exhange, University Library

Schedule and Speakers:

11am-12.30pm: Christoph Hoerl and Teresa McCormack: "Remember when?’ Looking for an account of joint reminiscing"

12.30-1.30pm: Lunch break

1.30-3pm: Julian Bacharach: "Is There Such a Thing as Joint Attention to the Past?”

3-3.20pm: Tea and coffee break

3.20-4.50pm: Tony Marcel: “Phenomena raising questions about ‘Autobiographical Memory’ and ‘Episodic Memory’”

 Everyone is welcome. After the event, there will be drinks and food at Benugo restaurant and bar in the Warwick Arts Centre.

Wed 22 Feb, '23
-
WMA Graduate Research Seminar
S0.52
Fri 24 Feb, '23
-
WMA talk
R0.04
Wed 1 Mar, '23
-
Reading Group: 'Afflictions of Mind'
S0.52

Delusion: 'De-rationalising Delusions' by V. Bell, N.Raihani and S. Wilkinson

https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/philosophy/research/researchcentres/wma/graduates/afflictionsofmind/

Fri 3 Mar, '23
-
Workshop: Practical Knowledge and the Content of Intention
S2.77

Lucy Campbell (Warwick): “The Content of Practical Knowledge and the Content of Intention”

Wed 8 Mar, '23
-
WMA Graduate Research Seminar
S0.52
Wed 8 Mar, '23
-
WMA Talk
S0.17

Guest Speaker: Giulia Martina’s (University of Tübingen)

Title: “Smelling Things”, which was co-written with Matt Nudds.

Giulia is a former Warwick PhD student and currently a post-doc at the University of Tübingen. She recently had a very nice paper on smell accepted in Mind and Language (https://doi.org/10.1111/mila.12440).

Fri 10 Mar, '23
-
Practical Knowledge and the Content of Intention

Xavier Castella (Girona): “On the Non-Propositional Content of our Ordinary Intentions” 

Wed 15 Mar, '23
-
Reading Group: 'Afflictions of Mind'
S0.52
Thu 30 Mar, '23 - Fri 31 Mar, '23
10am - 5pm
Moral Experience Workshop

Runs from Thursday, March 30 to Friday, March 31.

Thu 27 Apr, '23
-
Wiggins on Ethics
S2.77

“In Ethics: Twelve Lectures on the Philosophy of Morality, David Wiggin surveys the answers most commonly proposed for such questions—gathering insights from Hume, Kant, the utilitarians, and the post-utilitarian thinkers of the twentieth century. The view of morality he then proposes draws on sources as diverse as Aristotle, Simone Weil and present-day thinkers such as Philippa Foot. As need arises, he pursues a variety of related issues and engages additional thinkers—Plato and Bernard Williams on egoism and altruism, Schopenhauer and Aurel Kolnai on evil, Leibniz and Rawls on impartiality, and Montaigne and J. L. Mackie on ‘moral relativism’, among others.” For the most part, the seminars are planned to takein person, in S2.77, but we move online forsomelater sessions. All colleagues, including undergraduate and postgraduatestudents, are very welcome.

Thursday April 27, 3–5pm: Chapter 1: Glaucon’s and Adeimantus’ interrogation on Socrates

Thu 4 May, '23
-
Wiggins on Ethics
S2.77

“In Ethics: Twelve Lectures on the Philosophy of Morality, David Wiggin surveys the answers most commonly proposed for such questions—gathering insights from Hume, Kant, the utilitarians, and the post-utilitarian thinkers of the twentieth century. The view of morality he then proposes draws on sources as diverse as Aristotle, Simone Weil and present-day thinkers such as Philippa Foot. As need arises, he pursues a variety of related issues and engages additional thinkers—Plato and Bernard Williams on egoism and altruism, Schopenhauer and Aurel Kolnai on evil, Leibniz and Rawls on impartiality, and Montaigne and J. L. Mackie on ‘moral relativism’, among others.”

For the most part, the seminars are planned to take in person, in S2.77, but we move online for some later sessions. All colleagues, including undergraduate and postgraduate students, are very welcome.

Thursday May 4, 3–5pm: Chapter 2: Hume’s genealogy of morals

Thu 11 May, '23
-
Wiggins on Ethics
S2.77

“In Ethics: Twelve Lectures on the Philosophy of Morality, David Wiggin surveys the answers most commonly proposed for such questions—gathering insights from Hume, Kant, the utilitarians, and the post-utilitarian thinkers of the twentieth century. The view of morality he then proposes draws on sources as diverse as Aristotle, Simone Weil and present-day thinkers such as Philippa Foot. As need arises, he pursues a variety of related issues and engages additional thinkers—Plato and Bernard Williams on egoism and altruism, Schopenhauer and Aurel Kolnai on evil, Leibniz and Rawls on impartiality, and Montaigne and J. L. Mackie on ‘moral relativism’, among others.” For the most part, the seminars are planned to take in person, in S2.77, but we move online for some later sessions.

Thursday May 11, 3–5pm: Chapter 3: Hume’s theory extended

Thu 18 May, '23
-
Wiggins on Ethics
S2.77

“In Ethics: Twelve Lectures on the Philosophy of Morality, David Wiggin surveys the answers most commonly proposed for such questions—gathering insights from Hume, Kant, the utilitarians, and the post-utilitarian thinkers of the twentieth century. The view of morality he then proposes draws on sources as diverse as Aristotle, Simone Weil and present-day thinkers such as Philippa Foot. As need arises, he pursues a variety of related issues and engages additional thinkers—Plato and Bernard Williams on egoism and altruism, Schopenhauer and Aurel Kolnai on evil, Leibniz and Rawls on impartiality, and Montaigne and J. L. Mackie on ‘moral relativism’, among others.” For the most part, the seminars are planned to take in person, in S2.77, but we move online for some later sessions.

Thursday May 18, 3–5pm: Chapter 4: From Hume to Kant

Thu 25 May, '23
-
Wiggins on Ethics
S2.77

“In Ethics: Twelve Lectures on the Philosophy of Morality, David Wiggin surveys the answers most commonly proposed for such questions—gathering insights from Hume, Kant, the utilitarians, and the post-utilitarian thinkers of the twentieth century. The view of morality he then proposes draws on sources as diverse as Aristotle, Simone Weil and present-day thinkers such as Philippa Foot. As need arises, he pursues a variety of related issues and engages additional thinkers—Plato and Bernard Williams on egoism and altruism, Schopenhauer and Aurel Kolnai on evil, Leibniz and Rawls on impartiality, and Montaigne and J. L. Mackie on ‘moral relativism’, among others.” For the most part, the seminars are planned to take in person, in S2.77, but we move online for some later sessions.

Thursday May 25, 3–5pm: Chapter 5: The laws of morality as the laws of freedom and the laws of freedom as the laws of morality

Thu 8 Jun, '23
-
Wiggins on Ethics
S2.77

“In Ethics: Twelve Lectures on the Philosophy of Morality, David Wiggin surveys the answers most commonly proposed for such questions—gathering insights from Hume, Kant, the utilitarians, and the post-utilitarian thinkers of the twentieth century. The view of morality he then proposes draws on sources as diverse as Aristotle, Simone Weil and present-day thinkers such as Philippa Foot. As need arises, he pursues a variety of related issues and engages additional thinkers—Plato and Bernard Williams on egoism and altruism, Schopenhauer and Aurel Kolnai on evil, Leibniz and Rawls on impartiality, and Montaigne and J. L. Mackie on ‘moral relativism’, among others.” For the most part, the seminars are planned to take in person, in S2.77, but we move online for some later sessions.

Thursday June 8, 3–5pm: Chapter 6: Classical utilitarianism

Thu 22 Jun, '23
-
Wiggins on Ethics
Online

“In Ethics: Twelve Lectures on the Philosophy of Morality, David Wiggin surveys the answers most commonly proposed for such questions—gathering insights from Hume, Kant, the utilitarians, and the post-utilitarian thinkers of the twentieth century. The view of morality he then proposes draws on sources as diverse as Aristotle, Simone Weil and present-day thinkers such as Philippa Foot. As need arises, he pursues a variety of related issues and engages additional thinkers—Plato and Bernard Williams on egoism and altruism, Schopenhauer and Aurel Kolnai on evil, Leibniz and Rawls on impartiality, and Montaigne and J. L. Mackie on ‘moral relativism’, among others.” For the most part, the seminars are planned to take in person, in S2.77, but we move online for some later sessions.

 Thursday June 22, 3–5pm (Online): Chapter 8: The consequentialist argument

Wed 28 Jun, '23
-
WMA seminar - Eylem Özaltun
S0.17
Thu 29 Jun, '23
-
WMA MEEP Mini-Workshop
TBA

The Warwick Mind and Action Research Centre (WMA) is pleased to announce a new mini-workshop as part of our MEEP series. This series explores the intersection of topics typically found under the categories of 'Mind and Epistemology' and 'Ethics and Political Philosophy.' All are welcome!

Professor Carol Rovane, Columbia University

Social Conditions of the Psyche

Professor Akeel Bilgrami, Columbia University

The Commons and our Political Ideals

Time: 2:00-6:00pm, Thursday, 29 June 2023.

Venue: TBA

For more information about the WMA events, please visit:https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/philosophy/research/researchcentres/wma/

 

Thu 6 Jul, '23
-
Wiggins on Ethics
Online

 Thursday July 6, 3–5pm (online): Chapter 9: A first-order ethic of solidarity and reciprocity Depending on interest, we might then consider carrying on into chapters 10 (Justice) and 11–12 (Metaethics)

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