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Minorities and Philosophy (MAP)

About

MAP is a worldwide network of students based in English-speaking philosophy departments that aims to facilitate the participation of members from underrepresented groups in academic philosophy. MAP chapters are led by graduate students, but also rely on faculty support and encourage undergraduate participation.

Aims & Activities

MAP aims to address
(a) Issues of underrepresentation in the profession,
(b) Theoretical issues regarding philosophy of gender, race, sexual orientation, class, etc
(c) Philosophy done from minority perspectives, in order to contribute to more inclusive department cultures and to facilitate increased participation of underrepresented groups in academic philosophy.

With this aim in mind, MAP chapters host a variety of events, at which students have the opportunity to discuss the above topics and to connect with interested peers. MAP chapters also work alongside departments to promote a more supportive and inclusive environment.

Links

For more information, visit the following websites.
MAP website
MAP UK website

Getting Involved

If you would like to get involved, get in touch with us!
Firat Akova (F dot Akova at warwick dot ac dot uk)
Jaideep Shah (J dot Shah dot 1 at warwick dot ac dot uk)

Upcoming Events

MAP Student Workshop with Karen Simecek

When? Thursday, 4 May, 2-4pm

Where? Oculus Building, OC0.05

What?
MAP (Minorities and Philosophy) Warwick is happy to announce a student workshop with Karen Simecek. We will discuss Karen’s paper "Intimacy in Rankine's 'Citizen': The Importance of Failing to Share Perspectives“. Here is an abstract of the paper: "In this paper, I highlight a valuable way in which some works of lyric poetry can engage us in a kind of intimate relationship with the voice of the poem, one which invites us to share with a perspective of another but necessarily prevents one taking up that perspective as if one's own (i.e. it resists appropriation of that perspective). I argue that by establishing an intimate connection of this kind, poetry has the potential to reveal something of great moral significance: there is value in acknowledging what we can share with others including the limitations of such sharing. In illustrating my claims, I will focus on Claudia Rankine's sequence of poems Citizen (2014), which is concerned with everyday racism in American society and how we might be failing one another as people through a failure to acknowledge individual perspectives.“ A recent review of Citizen (2014) can be found here: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/aug/30/claudia-rankine-citizen-american-lyric-review.For whom?
This event is part of a series of MAP student workshops. All undergraduate and postgraduate students are very welcome! Please spread the word, especially to students who identify as members of underrepresent groups.

By whom?
MAP is a worldwide network of students based in English-speaking philosophy departments that aims to facilitate the participation of members from underrepresented groups in academic philosophy. MAP chapters are led by graduate students, but also rely on faculty support and encourage undergraduate participation.

Please see events page here

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Application to join MAP Mentoring Scheme (Undergraduate Applicants)