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EEA nationals - Brexit guidance

Flow chart of how a deal or no deal will affect EEA Nationals

Please see the flow chart here which summarises how a deal or no deal affects EEA nationals already in the UK or are arriving in the UK after the UK leaves the EU on 29 March 2019 12 April *31 October 2019 (*latest information @ 11 April 2019). This information is subject to change as further information is released by the UK Government.

Flow chart of how a deal or no deal will affect non EEA family members of EEA Nationals

Please see the flow chart here which summarises how a deal or no deal affects non-EEA family members of EEA nationals who are already in the UK or are arriving after 29 March 12 April 31 October 2019 This information is subject to change.

Latest information for EEA Nationals arriving in the UK after 29 March 12 April 31 October 2019.

Please see the link to the Gov.uk webpage which contains the latest information for EU nationals arriving in the UK after 29 March 12 April 2019 31 October 2019 in the event of a no deal.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/eu-immigration-after-free-movement-ends-if-theres-no-deal/immigration-from-30-march-2019-if-there-is-no-deal

If Britain leaves the EU without agreeing a deal, the government will seek to end free movement as soon as possible and has introduced an Immigration Bill to achieve this.

For a time-limited transitional period only, EEA citizens and their family members, including Swiss citizens, will still be able to come to the UK for visits, work or study and they will be able to enter the UK as they do now.

However, to stay longer than 3 months they will need to apply for permission and receive European Temporary Leave to Remain, which is valid for a further 3 years.

EU citizens wishing to stay for longer than 3 years will need to make a further application under the new skills-based future immigration system, which will begin from 2021.

This policy does not apply to anyone living in the UK before exit day as EU nationals living in the UK before 29 March 12 April 31 October 2019 will be able to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme.

The information also confirms that if there is no deal:

  • EU citizens arriving in the UK who wish to stay longer than 3 months and apply for European Temporary Leave to Remain will be subject to identity, criminality and security checks before being granted permission to stay for three years
  • non-EU family members who wish to accompany an EU citizen under these arrangements will need to apply in advance for a family permit
  • EU citizens will be able to enter and leave the UK as they do now, using e-gates when travelling on a biometric passport
  • the initial 3 months’ leave to enter for EU citizens will be free of charge but applications for European Temporary Leave to Remain will be paid for. Fees will be set out at a later date
  • Irish citizens will not need to apply for European Temporary Leave to Remain and will continue to have the right to enter and live in the UK under the Common Travel Area

EU Settlement Scheme for EU citizens currently living in the UK.

European Economic Area (EEA) nationals and Swiss nationals can currently live and work in the UK without any restriction under EEA Regulations.

In advance of the UK's exit from the EU on 29 March 12 April 31 October 2019, the UK Government has committed to protect the rights of EU citizens and their family members currently living in the UK. This includes the right to live here, work here and access public services such as healthcare and benefits. To retain these rights, EU citizens living in the UK and their family members must apply for their new UK Immigration status under the EU Settlement Scheme.

The deadline for applications if the UK exits the EU without a deal is 31 December 2020. If there is a deal and withdrawal agreement, the deadline is 30 June 2021.

The EU Countries are; Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain and Sweden.

Irish Citizens do not need to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme as they have a right of residence in the UK that is not reliant on the UK’s membership of the EU.

Iceland, Liechenstein and Norway are not in the EU but are part of the EEA. Switzerland is neither an EU nor EEA member but is part of the single market. The UK Government have been in discussions with Norway, Iceland, Liechenstein and Switzerland about securing the status of their citizens who are resident in the UK. Nationals form these countries will be able to apply for the scheme for settled status when the scheme opens fully on 30 March 2019.

The Home Office has published the documents below in relation to the Settlement Scheme:

EU Settlement Scheme:

The following websites give the most up-to-date information for EU staff in relation to Brexit:

  • GOV.UK provides the most up-to-date information to EU staff and students from the UK government.

Croatian nationals
Changes to the current registration requirements for Croatian workers have ceased from 1 July 2018, bringing their rights to work in the UK into line with other EU Citizens.Previously if a Croatian national wished to remain in the UK for more than 3 months, he/she required either a Blue, Yellow or Purple Registration Certificate.

 

 

Quick links

Brexit Guidance

Information pages to help people who have concerns about how Brexit might impact their study or work arrangements in the UK.

Details of the briefing slides and related FAQs following the Immigration Briefing held on 7 February 2019 led by Tijen Ahmet from Shakespeare Martineau.

EU settlement scheme

EU settlement scheme information

EU settlement reimbursement scheme

Guidance on the EU settlement reimbursement scheme