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7 easy (and subtle) stretches to do at your desk

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Woman doing arm stretches at her desk in front of a computer

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That’s a lot of time for joints to get stiff, muscles to get sore and for posture to become misaligned. Instead, using these hours more wisely is a simple way to improve your health and wellbeing.

We’ve rounded up seven exercises to do at your desk so you can sneak more wellness into your workday.

1. Base of lung breathing

What it’s good for: relaxation, lowering blood pressure, reduces anxiety and increases energy levels

How to do it: Place your hands on your lower ribs and sit up straight as you take some deep breaths in and out for 3 second count in and 3 second count out.

Base of lung breathing stretch

2. Shoulder shrugs

What it’s good for: relieving tension in shoulder blades and neck

How to do it: Place your hands by your side and raise your shoulders up towards your ears and then lower, keep your head facing forwards.

shoulder_shrugs.png

3. Neck side stretch

What it’s good for: headache prevention and easing jaw tension

How to do it: Place your hand on the opposite side of your head and gently put pressure on your head to tilt towards one side. Keep your shoulder low and do not tilt your head forward. Repeat on other side.

side neck stretch

4. Upper arm stretch

What it’s good for: relieving back and upper arm tension that often accumulates when using a computer

How to do it: Raise arms out in front of you with a bend in your elbows, keep palms facing up. Separate your arms out to the side to form a W shape, keep your shoulders lowered. Extend your arms out towards the side and bring back in making sure you do not lean forwards.

Arm stretch

5. Shoulder draw back

What it’s good for: stretching chest, upper back, aiding breathing and relaxation

How to do it: Keep your shoulders lowered and raise your arms (with hands facing down) out in front of you. With your shoulders still low, draw your arms in towards your body try to squeeze your shoulder blades together as you draw your arms back.

shoulder draw back

6. Seated rotation

What it’s good for: stretching the back and obliques, helping relax the mind and relieve stress

How to do it: Place your hands on the opposite shoulder keeping your arms lifted to be in line with your shoulders. Twist through your body, turning left and right. Making sure your lower body stays in contact with the chair at all times.

seated rotation

7. Chin to chest

What it’s good for: stretching the front and back of the neck to instantly diffuse stress

How to do it: Place one hand to rest on your sternum, place the other hand over the top and add gentle pressure whilst starting to look up. Raise tongue to the top of your mouth.

chin to chest stretch



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