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Talks, Papers and Publications

  • 'Africa or Death': The Comboni Sisters Medical Mission in Northern Uganda', Christian Missions in Global History Seminar, Institute for Historical Research, London, April 2018.
  • “We are the little doctors”: Midwives, Perceptions of Expertise, and Shifting Engagement with Hospitals in Uganda, 1918-1979, Research Seminar Series in the History of Science, Medicine, and Technology, Kings College London, February 2018.
  • ‘Medical and Oral Histories in Uganda’, Oral History Network seminar, University of Warwick, November 2017.
  • ‘The Place of Birth: Mothers, Midwives, Birth Attendants, and Choices about Childbirth in Twentieth-Century Uganda’, University of Warwick, Centre for the History of Medicine seminar, November 2017.
  • ‘The Place of Birth: Mothers, Midwives, Birth Attendants, and Choices about Childbirth in Twentieth-Century Uganda’, Cambridge University History and Philosophy of Science seminar, November 2017.
  • ‘‘Deep into the village’: Tracing Shifting Attitudes to Hospital Childbirth across Uganda’, Leeds University Centre for African Studies seminar, November 2017.
  • ‘‘The voice of the woman’: Nurture and the Role of Women in Education about Health in Uganda, 1897-1979’, Gender, Education, and Colonialism workshop, European University Institute, Florence, October 2017.
  • ‘‘Uncooperative characters’: Poverty, Hygiene, and Responsibility for Health in Twentieth-Century Uganda’, Shaping Education in the (Post)Colonial World Conference, University of Lausanne, September 2017.
  • ‘Picking the Message: Choosing the Risks and Benefits of Childbirth in Uganda, 1921-2017’, Risks of Childbirth in Historical Perspective Workshop, University of Brighton, July 2017.
  • ‘Imitation or Adaptation? Biomedicalizing Childbirth in Urban and Rural Uganda, 1918-2017’, European Conference of African Studies, University of Basel, July 2017.
  • ‘Learning Motherhood? Science Education, Girlhood, and Visions of the Future in Colonial and Post-Colonial Uganda’, Society for the History of Childhood and Youth Conference, Rutgers University, June 2017.
  • ‘‘Elementary Principles’ and ‘Ordinary Cleanliness’: Women’s and Children’s Welfare Programs and the Transmission and Adaptation of Biomedical Ideas in Colonial Uganda’, Berkshire Conference of Women Historians, Hofstra University, June 2017.
  • ‘Expatriate Women, Ugandan Health Workers, and Continuities in Humanitarian Medicine during Conflict in Uganda, 1971-2002’, 9th European Spring School on the History of Science and Popularization: Living in Emergency: Humanitarianism and Medicine, University of Mahon, May 2016.
  • ‘Deep, Deep, Deep in the Village’: Exploring Local Responses to Maternity Centres in Karamoja and Beyond, c. 1921-2017, Emerging Approaches in Uganda Studies workshop, Institute for Advanced Studies, University College London, April 2017.
  • Poverty Research Network panel, ‘Inequality, Global Inequality: A Divided History’, Global History and Culture Centre conference, University of Warwick, April 2017.
  • Co-presented with Elma Brenner, ‘Leprosy Hospitals and the Landscape: Beauty, Therapy and Well Being’, Beauty and the Hospital in History conference, University of Malta, April 2017.
  • “Instilling Simple Rules of Hygiene”? Hygiene as Education in Colonial Uganda, African Studies Association Conference, Washington, DC, November 2016.
  • ‘‘A midwife should be welcoming’: Personality, Midwives, and Shifting Perceptions of Healthcare in Uganda, 1918-1979’, History of Science, Medicine, and Technology Seminar, University of Oxford, November 2016.
  • ‘Eliminating Leprosy: 150 Years of History’, Department of Clinical Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand, September 2016.
  • ‘Patient Perspectives and Influences on Life in Uganda’s Colonial Leprosy Settlements, c. 1929-1962’, International Leprosy Congress, Beijing, September 2016.
  • ‘From Mission to NGO: Children, Philanthropy, and Decolonization in Uganda’, African Studies Association UK conference, Cambridge, September 2016.
  • ‘Education is the only hope’: Ugandan Midwives as Missionaries of Health, Civilization, and Christianity, 1897-1979, Religion and Medicine conference, Birkbeck, University of London, July 2016.
  • ‘Decolonization and Philanthropy: Governments, Missions, Charities and Leprosy Control in Uganda, c. 1945-1980’, Voluntary Action History Society conference, University of Liverpool, July 2016.
  • '‘Information should radiate out’: Maternity and Child Welfare Centres as Spaces of Education in Twentieth-Century Uganda', Society for the Social History of Medicine conference, University of Kent, July 2016.
  • ‘Representations of Poverty and Leprosy in Uganda, 1927-2016’, Aesthetics of Poverty Workshop, University of Warwick, June 2016.
  • ‘'Leprosy has been eliminated'?: Multiple Perspectives on the Aftermath of Leprosy in Twentieth-Century Uganda’, After the End of Disease, Birkbeck, University of London, May 2016.