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Provisional Programme (subject to change)

Alien Nations:

Identities and Empires in Global History

14-15 March 2014

Scarman, University of Warwick

 

Day 1: 14 March

Registration

09.00-10.15

 

Welcome and introductions

10.15-10.30


Panel 1

10.30-12.30

Loyalty and Identity in the Long 19th Century

David Anderson (University of Warwick)

Loyalist Delhi 1857?


William Bramwell (University of Warwick)

Title t.bc.


Alexander Morrison (Nazarbayev University)

Imperial and Religious Loyalties on the Syr-Darya Line, 1847-1865


Lunch

12.30-1.30

 

Panel 2

1.30-3.30

Settler Colonialism

Jennifer Sessions (University of Iowa)

Spoilator or Arabophile? An Algerian Settler between Metrople and Colony


Will Jackson (University of Leeds)

Poor Whites, Failed Whites, Nativised Whites: Deviance and Distress in the British World


Donald MacRaild (University of Ulster)

Class and Ethnic Conflict in the English Immigrant Experiences of 19th Century America


Refreshments

3.30-4.00


Panel 3

4.00-6.00

Contested Identities and World War II

Yasmin Khan (University of Oxford)

Title t.b.c

Christian Hess (Sophia University, Tokyo)

Title t.b.c.


Dinner

7.30

 

Day 2: 15 March

 

Panel 4

10.00-12.45

Conflict and Identity

Isa Blumi (Georgia State University)

Transitional Migrants: The Global Ottoman Refugee and Colonial Terror


Natalia Sobrevilla-Perea (University of Kent)

Fighting for the ‘Fatherland’ in the Andes 1808-1815


Robert Fletcher (University of Exeter)

Title t.b.c.


Daniel Branch (University of Warwick)

Empire, Loyalism and Global Lives


Lunch

12.45-2.00


Panel 5

2.00-4.00

Contested Decolonisations

Lori Watt (Washington University in St Louis)

Inclusions and Exclusions at the End of the Japanese Empire


Natasha Pairadeau (University of Cambridge)

Indian Experiences of the End of French rule in Indochina, or how Colonial Intermediaries Entered a World of Nation States (1940-1954)


Gerard McCann (University of York)

Do Magazines Culture?: Rajat Neogy, Transition Magazine and the Future in Decolonizing East Africa, 1961-68

 

Conclusion

4.30