Skip to main content Skip to navigation

Composite calendar

This is a composite calendar page template pulling in feeds from events calendars in department and research centre sites. It is purely used as a tool to collect the event details before filtering through to a publicly-visible calendar filter page template. To remove or add a feed to this composite calendar, please contact the IT Services Web Team (webteam at warwick dot ac dot uk).

Wednesday, May 08, 2019

 
-
Light in Darkness: The mystical philosophy of Jacob Böhme
Chapel of Christ the Servan, Coventry Cathedral

Runs from Tuesday, April 30 to Friday, July 05.

Light in Darkness: The mystical philosophy of Jacob Böhme

Free special guided tours of the exhibition.

-
Global Reading Group 'Globalists: The End of Empire and the Birth of Neoliberalism by Quinn Slobodian'
H0.58 Humanities Building
-
Global Reading Group 'Globalists, Quinn Slobodian'
H0.58 Humanities Building
-
Faculty Education Committee (Arts)
Senate House Council Chamber
-
Work in Progress Seminar: Guest Speaker: Catharine Edwards "The epistolographic self in Seneca's letters"
Oculus 1.02

Prof. Catharine Edwards (Birkbeck, University of London)

"The epistolographic self in Seneca's letters"

Prof. Catharine Edwards is Professor of Classics and Ancient Histiory at Birkbeck. She is the author, among other works, of Death in Ancient Rome (Yale 2007) and Writing Rome: Textual Approaches to the City (CUP 1996). Her research focuses on Roman cultural history and Latin prose literature (particularly the younger Seneca), as well as Reception of Classical Antiquity in later periods.

Chair: Martina Russo

-
History Module Fair
Zeeman Building Foyer (The Streets)
-
Research Seminar: Anna Douglas (curator), ‘Saturday Night and Sunday Morning: locating memory and animating engagement through film and exhibition’
A0.28 (Millburn House)
-
Medieval Seminar Series: Prof. Nicolette Zeeman (King’s College Cambridge)
Oculus Building, Universtity of Warwick (OC1.07)

Topic: tbc

-
Research Seminar Series: Nathan Brown, Concordia University, “Expanded Poetics: Romantic, Modernist, Contemporary”
OC1.04

Throughout its history, poetics has been characterized by a tension between the study of poetry and the study of poiesis. Applied to poetry, poetics is the theory of a specifically literary practice, attentive to its forms, its histories, its rhetorical tropes and critical categories. Applied to poiesis, poetics is the theory of making or production in general—a field of concern extending well beyond literature and potentially encompassing not only all the arts but also the products of nature and industry. A theory of expanded poetics would take this tension between the specific and general purview of the field as its explicit object of concern; it would foreground the scope of poetics as its constitutive problem, attending to the conceptual and disciplinary difficulties that arise as soon as poetics is extended (as it always has been) beyond the study of literature.

 

This lecture will articulate a modern history of expanded poetics, tracking its generative problems of boundary formation through discrepant romantic, modernist, and contemporary moments. Such a periodization of divergent approaches to the tension between poetry and poiesis will not only frame the intellectual history of poetics as a discipline, it may also help us to understand, contextualize, and delimit the appeal to “interdisciplinarity” as an institutional imperative of the contemporary university.

 

Nathan Brown is Associate Professor of English and the Canada Research Chair in Poetics at Concordia University, where he also directs the Centre for Expanded Poetics. The author of The Limits of Fabrication: Materials Science, Materialist Poetics (Fordham, 2017), Brown has also edited numerous volumes, including the collection, Poeisis. Many of these volumes have come out his collaboration with Peter Milat, with whom Brown coordinates an ongoing series of symposia in Zagreb and Dubrovnik, titled Conjunction–21st Century Philosophy, Politics, and Aesthetics. His essays appear in venues like Radical Philosophy and Parrhesia, and he has recently completed a book manuscript titled Rationalist Empiricism: A Theory of Speculative Critique.
-
Medieval Seminar
H203

Prof. Nicolette Zeeman (King’s College Cambridge