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Arianna Autieri

Arianna

Bio

Arianna is a CADRE-funded PhD student in Translation Studies supervised jointly by Dr Chantal Wright and Dr Christina Britzolakis. Arianna is in her 3rd year. Her thesis is entitled "James Joyce’s music performed: the “Sirens” fugue in experimental re-translation-s.”

Arianna’s doctoral research focuses on producing a re-translation into Italian of the “Sirens” episode in James Joyce’s Ulysses and endorses the existing arguments that, in a re-translation context and in addressing a text such as James Joyce’s Ulysses, the traditional understanding of translation as a “faithful” transposition of the “meaning” of the source text (ST) into the target text (TT) needs to be challenged in favour of an understanding of translation as a more visible act of interpretation. Specifically, in this study, she is investigating how translation can serve as a critical tool in addressing Joyce’s famous musical episode, “Sirens”, which he claimed to have written adopting the musical technique of the fuga per canonem (JJ, 462). The purpose of her doctoral research can be described as twofold: i) to support the idea that translation is an interpretation whose necessary partiality can be turned into a value by the translator adopting a more visible stance and through informed readings of the ST and literary criticism thereof ii) contribute to the many studies on musicality in Joyce’s prose from the performing standpoint of the translator – a critic who is also concerned with the linguistic shaping of the ST in the target language (TL).

In her research, she also proposes to investigate how Clive Scott’s “experimental translation” principles for poetry translation might be applied to prose, and how they could be useful for “performing” Joyce’s musicality in a TT. In this context, she is mostly interested in the concepts of “translation for the polyglot reader”, “listening” and “overwriting”. Her research also aligns with current studies in the field of Word and Music studies.

Her research interests include: Translation Theory and Practice, experimental translation and experimental writing, Modernism, James Joyce, Ulysses, Word and Music Studies, Music.

Qualifications

  • PhD in Translation Studies, University of Warwick (2018-present)
  • MA in European and Extra-European Languages and Literatures (English and Translation Studies), Università degli Studi di Milano. (2014-2017)
  • BA in Music Studies (instrument: Classical Guitar), Conservatorio G.Verdi, Milano. (2011-2014)
  • BA in Foreign Languages and Literatures, English and Spanish, Università degli Studi di Milano. (2010-2013)

Teaching:

  • 2020-2021: CW102 The Written World, Term 2, Warwick Writing Programme, School of Creative Arts Performance and Visual Cultures, University of Warwick
  • 2019-2020: EN127 the Written World, Term 2, English and Creative Writing, University of Warwick
  • 2017-2018: English Language and Culture teacher at Liceo Classico C.Beccaria, Milan.
  • 2017: Music teacher at Istituto Comprensivo Statale "Via Maffucci", Milan.

Awards:

  • CADRE Scholarship (2018-2022)
  • 2019 Giorgio Melchiori Grant – James Joyce Italian Foundation
  • 2019 Trieste Joyce School Scholarship
  • 2020 The Friends of the Zurich James Joyce Foundation Scholarship
  • 2021 International James Joyce Foundation scholarship

Memberships

  • International James Joyce Foundation member

Events Organised

  • HRC (Humanities Research Centre) funded conference: “Breaking the walls of Babel: Dialogues in translation.” (May 8, 2021)
  • Women in Translation Symposium, funded through the Warwick Prize for Women in Translation by Arts Impact Fund at Warwick, and entitled “Breaking The Glass Ceiling: women in translation in dialogue” (April 30, 2021)
  • Workshop “Assessment of quality in (re)translating musicalized prose: A case study on the Finnish, Swedish, and Italian (re)translations of the ‘Sirens’ episode of James Joyce’s Ulysses” – in KäTu2020 Symposium, University of Helsinki (postponed May 2021)
  • 15th Annual Warwick English PG Symposium, Department of English and Comparative Literature, University of Warwick (May 2019)