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Emmanouil Konstantinidis (Assistant Professor)

Manos Konstantinidis

 

Research Interests:

Risky and intertemporal choice; decisions from experience; reinforcement learning; behavioural science; computational modelling; gambling; estimation.

The main focus of my research is on judgment and decision making with an emphasis on the computational modelling of the underlying psychological and cognitive processes. Specifically, I am interested in how people make choices under risk and uncertainty in various basic and applied domains, the role of learning and memory processes, and the combination of different sources of information when people make judgments and decisions. To provide insights into the mechanisms of human behaviour, my research utilises a mixture of laboratory experiments, quantitative techniques, and computational cognitive models.

Contact Details

Representative publications:

  • Ballard, T., Luckman, A. J., & Konstantinidis, E. (submitted). How meaningful are parameter estimates from models of inter-temporal choice?
  • Harman, J. L., Yu, M., Konstantinidis, E., & Gonzalez, C. (in press). How to use a multi-criteria comparison procedure to improve modeling competitions: A comment on Erev et al. (2017). Psychological Review.
  • Konstantinidis, E., van Ravenzwaaij, D., Güney, S., & Newell, B. R. (2020). Now for sure or later with a risk? Modeling risky intertemporal choice as accumulated preference. Decision, 7, 91–120.
  • Konstantinidis, E., Taylor, R. T., & Newell, B. R. (2018). Magnitude and incentives: Revisiting the overweighting of extreme events in risky decisions from experience. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 25, 1925–1933.
  • Weiss–Cohen, L., Konstantinidis, E., Speekenbrink, M., & Harvey, N. (2018). Task complexity moderates the influence of descriptions in decisions from experience. Cognition, 170, 209-227.
  • Ashby, N. J. S., Konstantinidis, E., & Yechiam, E. (2017). Choice in experiential learning: True preferences or experimental artifacts? Acta Psychologica, 174, 59-67.
  • Speekenbrink, M., & Konstantinidis, E. (2015). Uncertainty and exploration in a restless bandit problem. Topics in Cognitive Science, 7, 351–367.

 

A full list of publications can be found on Google Scholar.

 

Supervisor to:
Isabelle Barrett