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Political Economy of Development Conference

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Political Economy of Development Conference

This conference aims to bring together leading scholars and researchers working on these issues, both from theoretical and empirical perspectives. Topics to be covered include the role of long-term institutions, media, corruption, political accountability, conflict, decentralization, and public service delivery, among others. The participant list can be found here.

Friday 7 July - Saturday 8 July 2017
Scarman House, University of Warwick

Purpose

The aim of this conference is to bring together leading academics and researchers to discuss recent advances in political economy of development and to provide a platform to stimulate collaboration and interdisciplinary thinking between economists and political scientists. The conference provides an opportunity for researchers from different universities and countries to discuss their work in a relaxed atmosphere and to develop long-term collaborative relationships.

There is increasing recognition that institutional and political economy factors are central to economic development and growth. As a result, research on economic development has increasingly focused on questions of political economy, trying to understand how institutions, governance structures, and politics affect the choices made by governments and citizens, and in turn what are the factors that determine institutional and political choices.

Friday 7 July

Time  

9.30 – 10.00

Registration and Coffee (Scarman Foyer)

Session 1

 

10.00 – 11.00

Valeria Rueda, Sciences Po, “Sex and the Mission: The Conflicting Effects of Early Christian Investments on Sub-Saharan Africa's HIV Epidemic”

Discussant: Yannick Dupraz, Warwick

11.00 – 11.15

Coffee break

Scarman Lounge

11.15 – 12.15

Monica Martinez-Bravo, CEMFI, “The Effects of Anti-vaccine Propaganda on Immunization: Evidence from Pakistan"

Discussant: Pamela Campa, Calgary

12.15 -14.00

Lunch

Lakeview Restaurant, Scarman House

Session 2

 
14.00 – 15.00

Stefano Giargliaduci, EIEF, “War of Waves: Radio Propaganda, Violence, and Political Polarization"

Discussant: Mirko Draca, Warwick

15.00 – 16.00

Johanna Rickne, Stockholm, “All the Single Ladies: Job Promotions and the Durability of Marriage"

Discussant: Audinga Baltrunaite, Bank of Italy

16.00 – 16.15

Coffee break

Scarman Lounge

16.15 – 17.15

Vincent Pons, Harvard, “Biometric Monitoring Improves Health Care Provision and Reduces Misreporting - Experimental Evidence from TB Control in India”

Discussant: Lucia Corno

17.15 – 18.15

Irma Clots-Figueras, Carlos III, "Politician Identity and Religious Violence in India"

Discussant: Cecila Testa, Nottingham

Saturday 8 July

Session 3  

10.00 – 11.00

Olle Folke, Uppsala, "Socially excluded but politically included? The selection of radical-right politicians"

Discussant: Andy Eggers, Oxford

11.00 – 11.15

Coffee Break

Scarman Lounge

11.15 – 12.15

Sebastian Axbard, Queen Mary, “Convicting Corrupt Officials: Evidence from Randomly Assigned Cases”

Discussant: Joana Naritomi, LSE

12.15 – 14.00

Lunch

Lakeview Restaurant, Scarman House

Session 4  
14.00 – 15.00

Horacio Larregui, Harvard, “A Market Equilibrium Approach to Reduce the Incidence of Vote-Buying: Evidence from Uganda,”

Discussant: Clement Imbert, Warwick

15.00 – 16.00

Julien Labonne, Oxford, “Politically Incredible: Voters’ Response to Campaign Promises”

Discussant: Piero Stanig, Bocconi

16.00 – 16.15

Coffee Break

Scarman Lounge

16.15 – 17.15

Gianmarco León, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, “Accountability, Political Capture and Selection into Politics: Evidence from Peruvian Municipalities”

Discussant: Francesco Sobbrio

17.15 - 18.15

Kate Orkin, Oxford, “The Effect of Information on Polls on Beliefs, Turnout and Party Votes in a Close Election: Experimental Evidence from South Africa”

Discussant: Alexandra Cirone, LSE

Registration

You must register via the link below to book a place for this event.

Register for event


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