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Press Releases


Coronavirus fears increase economic anxieties, researchers find

In the first analysis of how COVID19 affects economic sentiment, a team of researchers including Dr Thiemo Fetzer and Dr Christopher Roth from the University of Warwick has found that the arrival of the new Coronavirus in a country is associated with a sharp increase in Google searches indicative of anxieties and economic fears.


Uncertainty and the financial markets explored by Warwick faculty at Bank of England conference supported by Rebuilding Macroeconomics

Researchers from Warwick Economics and Warwick Business School are among the speakers taking part in a major policy conference organized in partnership with the Bank of England and Rebuilding Macroeconomics. The conference will bring together international researchers from around the globe to discuss whether, and how, economists and policymakers can replace the notion of ‘rational economic man’ with theoretical and empirical models that recognize its limitations.


Local residents entertained, challenged and moved by ESRC Festival of Social Science

More than 500 people took part in the workshops, talks and activities organised by the University of Warwick for this year’s ESRC Festival of Social Science. University researchers took to Coventry and Warwickshire’s streets, bars and community centres to share insights from their work with enthusiastic and interested audiences. The events tackled topics from the nature of time itself and the puzzle of DNA to taxes and accents.


Memory is damaged by air pollution, researchers find

New research from the University of Warwick shows that human memory is significantly worse in parts of England with high levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and air particulates (PM10). The difference in memory quality between England’s cleanest and most-polluted areas is equivalent to the loss of memory from 10 extra years of ageing.


Reading the past like an open book – researchers use text to measure two hundred years of happiness

Was there such a thing as ‘the good old days’ when people were happier? Are current Government policies more or less likely to increase their citizens’ feelings of wellbeing? Using innovative methods researchers have built a new index that uses data from books and newspaper to track levels of national happiness from 1820. Their research could help governments to make better decisions about policy priorities.


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