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Security Studies Media

See also: Podcasts from May 14th Question Time: Perspectives on 'The War on Terror'¦

Professor Thomas Weigend

11:15, Wed 28 May 2008

IAS Seminar 2 20/2/2008 How terrorism has invaded German law The threat of terrorism hit Germany in two waves, the first in the 1970s and 1980s, the second in the general context of 11 Sept., 2001. Both waves have led to extensive legislation in substantive and procedural criminal law. The 1970s saw the introduction of the new criminal offence of being a member of a terrorist organisation as well as ad hoc legislation cutting back on the rights of the defence. More recently, the powers of the State to use secret methods of surveillance in investigating crime have been extended with terrorism suspects being the main target. Additional measures are in the planning and drafting stages. The (perceived and real) threat of terorrism has thus significantly changed the climate of criminal justice in Germany.

(MP3 format, 21 MB)

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Tony Bunyan

11:13, Wed 28 May 2008

IAS Seminar 2 20/2/2008 The effect of the war on terrorism on civil liberties in the European Union. This talk will examine the nature of the terrorist threat posed after 11 September 2001, considering the claims that demands for security have been balanced by respect for rights and civil liberties and that this terrorism threatens to destroy "our way life" - by asking whose way of life? I will contend that there are at least two world views on what has happened and that the threat to "our way of life" comes more from the reactions of EU governments to the threat of terrorism than from this form of terrorism itself. These contentions will be examined with reference to the measures taken to tackle terrorism, the targeting and surveillance of migrant communities, the surveillance society and the policing state. The response to terrorism will be situated in the role of the emerging state and political culture in the EU.

(MP3 format, 17 MB)

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Naomi Norberg

11:09, Wed 28 May 2008

IAS Seminar 2 20/2/2008 Combating terrorism or excluding foreigners? The Europe Union began tightening immigration controls well before the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States: as the Schengen acquis made it easier to move about within the Union, the moat around “fortress Europe” grew deeper and wider as the 1990s wore on. But those attacks, and subsequent ones in Europe, catalyzed the passage of stricter immigration laws that, in many cases, implement harsh asylum policies as well. In an attempt to keep their citizens safe from terrorists, states are barring the door to foreigners and making it easier to deport those who’ve already made it inside. Antiterrorist measures are thus taking on an antiforeigner tinge that conflicts with states’ obligations under international human rights treaties and the Refugee Convention of 1951.

(MP3 format, 15 MB)

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Philp Seib

11:37, Mon 12 May 2008

IAS Seminar 3 23/4/2008 Covering Cyberterrorism: Issues For Journalists Even journalists who have covered conflict for many years may find themselves challenged by the complexities of reporting about Internet-based terrorist activity. In much the same way that military officials find cyberterrorism daunting, journalists may discover themselves on unfamiliar terrain.

(MP3 format, 9.4 MB)

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Phillipe Very and Betrand Monnet

11:23, Mon 12 May 2008

IAS SEMINAR 3: 23/4/2008 Cybercrime: How Organized Crime Profit From Technology Cybercrime is a generic concept that covers a huge diversity of illicit activities developed by individuals as well as structured groups. Criminal organizations like mafias, cartels and gangs nowadays use cybercrime for attacking companies. They develop three types of strategies: predation, parasitism and competition. We reviewed how these criminal groups use information technology for implementing each strategy and its inherent tactics. This analysis illustrates the ability of organized crime to seize technological opportunities in order to invent new ways of assaulting their targets. Consequently, the security of the firm’s information systems needs to be revised and adapted to technological evolutions.

(MP3 format, 15 MB)

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Questions and Answers From IAS Seminar 3

11:23, Mon 12 May 2008

Q & A from the three presentations.

(MP3 format, 31 MB)

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Maura Conway

11:22, Mon 12 May 2008

IAS Seminar 3 23/4/2008 Terrorist Use of the Internet

(MP3 format, 16 MB)

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Adrian Hunt

16:04, Fri 9 May 2008

Intelligence, Evidence & the Prevention of Terrorism When does intelligence become evidence? Is this a way of justifying action which ordinarily would not be then treated as evidence without clear protections of disclosure and opportunities for legal challenge? This paper will consider a range of activities from UN blacklisting to EU measures and domestic control orders.

(MP3 format, 19 MB)

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Mark Tuley & Mike Griffiths

16:02, Fri 9 May 2008

Intelligence and Evidence This presentation will address the following: What is intelligence? Goodies and Baddies both gather intelligence. The Intelligence Cycle and it’s use within the Governments counter-terrorism Strategy. Government counter-terrorism strategy

(MP3 format, 21 MB)

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Bill Durodie

15:58, Fri 9 May 2008

Obsessions with the Unknown When former US Secretary of State for Defence, Donald Rumsfeld, warned of the dangers lurking within the 'unknown unknowns' at a press conference in 2002, he was using an increasingly common argument - widely advocated by environmental campaigners before him - that the risks we should really worry about are those that we don't even know we know nothing about. Is this line of argument fruitful for risk management processes or is society in danger of paralysing policy and action through its growing focus on uncertainty and ignorance?

(MP3 format, 20 MB)

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