Coronavirus (Covid-19): Latest updates and information
Skip to main content Skip to navigation

EC233: Development Economics (Microeconomics)

  • Thomas Martin

    Module Leader
15 CATS - Department of Economics
Spring Module

Principal Aims

This module allows students to develop an understanding of concepts at the core of development economics from a micro-economic perspective: i) What is poverty?, ii) How do agricultural households make decisions? iii) Why do some children work? The core material will be taken from papers from academic journals, so students will start to see what development economists spend part of their time doing. Within this discussion there will be ample use of econometric techniques (sometimes using STATA) applied to micro development issues.

Principal Learning Outcomes

Professional skills: Demonstrate they have learned to read and cite the relevant economic literature to address key questions on development from a microeconomic perspective.The teaching and learning methods that enable students to achieve this learning outcome are: Lectures, seminars and private studyThe summative assessment methods that measure the achievement of this learning outcome are: Problem sets and examination

Cognitive skills: Demonstrate they have extended their core skills in economic analysis and quantitative methods and will be able to apply this skill in the analysis of problems typical of a developing and less developed economy. The teaching and learning methods that enable students to achieve this learning outcome are: Lectures, seminars and private studyThe summative assessment methods that measure the achievement of this learning outcome are: Problem sets and examination

Key skills: Understand development economic studies. Use their content to engage with policy debates. The teaching and learning methods that enable students to achieve this learning outcome are: Lectures, seminars and private studyThe summative assessment methods that measure the achievement of this learning outcome are: Problem sets and examination

Subject knowledge and understanding the methodsBy the end of the module the student should be able to demonstrate their understanding of the key issues facing the poor in developing countries such as malnutrition and diseases, lack of education, gender inequality, or reduced access to credit and insurance. The students should also be able to use empirical evidence and economic reasoning to discuss the policies aimed at addressing these issues.The teaching and learning methods that enable students to achieve this learning outcome are: Lectures, seminars and private studyThe lectures will present theoretical models backed with empirical evidence on the issues of interest, which will help to illustrate the application of these skills.The seminars will offer a forum to discuss and further understand the nuances involved in developing these skills. The summative assessment methods that measure the achievement of this learning outcome are: Problem sets and examination

Syllabus

The module will typically cover the following topics:

1. Poverty Traps2. Health and Nutrition3. Education in Developing Countries4. Gender and Households5. Credit and Insurance Markets6. Psychological Aspects of Poverty

Context

Core Module
L1L8 - Year 3
Optional Module
L100 - Year 2, L1P5 - Year 1, L1PA - Year 1, LM1D (LLD2) - Year 2, V7ML - Year 2, V7ML - Year 3, V7MP - Year 2, V7MP - Year 3, V7MR - Year 2, V7MR - Year 3, V7MM - Year 4, R9L1 - Year 4, R3L4 - Year 4, R4L1 - Year 4, R2L4 - Year 4, R1L4 - Year 4, LA99 - Year 2, LA99 - Year 3
Pre or Co-requisites
Any of: EC106-24 Introduction to Economics OR EC107-30 Economics 1 OR EC108-30 Macroeconomics 1 AND EC109-30 Microeconomics 1 AND EC107-30 Economics 1
Part-year Availability for Visiting Students
Available in the Spring term only (2 problem sets - 12 CATS) and in the Spring and Summer terms together (2 problem sets and 1 x 2 hour exam - 15 CATS)

Assessment

Assessment Method
Coursework (30%) + 2 hour examination (summer) (70%)
Coursework Details
Problem Set 1 (15%), Problem Set 2 (15%), 2 hour examination (summer) (70%)
Exam Timing
N/A

Exam Rubric

Time Allowed: 2 Hours

Read all instructions carefully- and read through the entire paper at least once before you start entering your answers.

There are TWO Sections in this paper. Answer ONE question in Section A (40 marks) and THREE questions in Section B (60 marks in total).

Approved pocket calculators are allowed.

You should not submit answers to more than the required number of questions. If you do, we will mark the questions in the order that they appear, up to the required number of questions in each section.

Previous exam papers can be found in the University’s past papers archive. Please note that previous exam papers may not have operated under the same exam rubric or assessment weightings as those for the current academic year. The content of past papers may also be different.

Reading Lists