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2: MSc Courses


Getting started

Induction and enrolment

You should register with the Department on Monday 17 September 2018 between 9.30 — 11.30am in room S2.77 Social Sciences Building.

You will also need to formally enrol as a student with the University’s Academic Office between 10.00am — 12.30pm on Monday 17 September 2018 in room S2.79 Social Sciences Building. It is important that you do so in order to obtain a University card, which will enable you to use the Library and computing services, including email, both of which you will need right from the start of the academic year.

Although the Introductory Mathematics and Statistics teaching takes place in the two weeks before term starts (Tuesday 18 September — Thursday 27 September 2018 inclusive), lectures for your other Autumn Term modules start on the Monday of Week 2 (Monday 8 October 2018). There are also introductory meetings about the University Library that form part of our dissertation skills training. Details of all important dates are given below.

Important Dates

Pre-Term
Mon 17 Sep 2018 9.30am-11.30am - Departmental Registration (Room S2.77 Social Sciences Building)

10.00am-12.30pm - University Enrolment (Room S2.79 Social Studies Building)
  2.00-4.00pm - MSc Introductory Meeting (Room MS.01, Grd Floor, Maths & Stats, Zeeman Building)
  4.15pm — 4.45pm - Library Introductory Meeting (Room MS.01, Grd Floor, Maths & Stats, Zeeman Building)
  5.00—7.00pm - Welcome Reception and Address (Chancellor’s Suite, Rootes Building - drinks and food will be provided).
Tue 18 Sep — Fri 28 Sep 2018 Introductory Maths & Statistics, (Room MS.01 Grd Floor, Maths & Stats, Zeeman Building)
Wed 19 Sep 2018 5.30-7.00pm Sports Activities
Fri 21 Sep 2018 5.30-7.30pm - Dinner and Quiz (Panorama Room, Rootes Building)
Mon 24 Sep 2018

Introductory Maths & Statistics Multiple Choice Test

Autumn Term (1 Oct – 8 Dec 2018)
Mon 1 Oct 2018 5.30pm—7.00pm - Question Time, (Butterworth Hall, Warwick Arts Centre)
Wed 3 Oct 2018 Deadline for signing-up online for the compulsory Dissertation Research Methods: Library sessions
Thu 4 Oct 2018 9.15am—12.00pm - Introductory Maths & Statistics Test (Panorama Room)
Mon 8 — Fri 12 Oct 2018 Personal Tutor Week
Spring Term (7 Jan – 16 Mar 2019)
Mon 7 — Fri 11 Jan 2019 Examinations for EC9011 and EC9012
Mon 18 — Fri 22 Feb 2019 Personal Tutor Week
Mon 18 Mar 2019 Project deadline for EC902 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics A & EC910 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics B
Summer Term (24 Apr – 29 June 2019)
Mon 6 May - Sat 18 June 2019 MSc Exam Period
Summer Vacation
Wed 28 Aug 2019 Project submission deadline for MSc Behavioural and Economic Science
Wed 11 Sep 2019 Dissertation submission deadline for MSc in Economics and MSc Economics and International Financial Economics
First week of Nov 2019 MSc results published
Wed 11 Mar 2020 MSc dissertation deadline for those with granted extensions

Course overview

MSc Economics (L1P6) is run entirely from within the Department. MSc Economics and International Financial Economics (L1P7) is also run within the Department and follows a similar structure to that of MSc Economics, but the choice of optional modules and the dissertation topic are more focused.

There are two courses which operate in conjunction with other departments. The MSc in Behavioural and Economic Science (Economics Track) (C8P8) is a joint degree programme run by the Departments of Economics and Psychology: the Department of Economics is responsible for the administration of this programme and all enquiries should be directed to the Economics Postgraduate Office. The MSc in Finance and Economics is managed by the Business School (although much of the course is taught by members of the Economics Department) and you should direct any questions about that course to the Finance Masters Programmes team in the Warwick Business School.

Course Specifications

There is a course specification for every MSc course. Each course specification sets out the aims of the course, the skills and knowledge a graduate from that course will possess, as well as how it is taught and assessed. Course specifications can be found on the University website.

Course Regulations

Degree Course Regulations are the rules by which each degree operates in terms of the structure. The regulations exist to ensure that the degree courses remain relevant and the quality remains high. The various rules and restrictions ensure that the degree content is not unduly diluted whilst allowing you the flexibility to make choices and to tailor your degree to your particular interests. It is important that you familiarise yourself with the regulations for your degree course by carefully reading the relevant information below, as failure to adhere to them can have serious consequences.

You should regard your degree course regulations as being largely static throughout your time in the Department. However, you should also be aware that the Department does sometimes have occasion to amend these regulations. We do this for positive reasons: we want to keep the content of your degree course up-to-date and reflective of exciting developments and trends in the field; or we may have new academic staff joining us with new perspectives and ideas for new modules. Sometimes, we may need to adjust the CATS weighting of a module, or revisit which students should be able to take it and which term it is taught in. On other occasions, we may feel it's necessary to suspend or discontinue a module, perhaps because of staffing changes or in order to keep our curriculum fresh and dynamic. Whatever the reason for such changes, the Department is committed to consulting with our students prior to major changes to our degree courses. This consultation may happen via the Graduate Student-Staff Liaison Committee (GSSLC) or through wider means. If you are affected by major changes to the curriculum, degree course regulations and other regulatory changes, you will be informed by the Department in a timely manner. Should you need advice on any aspect of your degree course regulations, please contact the Postgraduate Office.

Concerning the availability of modules, we cannot guarantee that all modules listed in this Handbook will be available each year or that the same lecturer will continue to deliver the modules. There are reasons why at times the Department may have to remove or make changes to a module:

  • a module teacher going on study leave
  • academic staff leaving Warwick
  • another module is made available so the current one is removed to avoid overlap
  • continuous review of the curriculum and teaching methods to ensure we are teaching relevant and interesting material
  • the need to ensure that assessment methods are the most suitable for a particular module.

Each degree course is comprised of a number of core (compulsory) modules, together with optional modules. Your degree course regulations set out which modules you must take.

Warwick uses the Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme (CATS) to express credit weightings for each module. Credit is expressed in quantified form so that achievement in different contexts can be broadly compared in terms of intellectual depth (level) and relative volume (number of credits). One CAT represents 10 hours of learning time.

The minimum credit to be taken for an MSc degree is 180 CATS and the minimum pass mark for all postgraduate modules is 50. To be awarded your MSc degree you must pass 150 CATS, including all core modules, providing that a mark of at least 40 is obtained in the failed module(s). You will normally have one opportunity to remedy failure in modules that equate with no more than one half of the taught element of the course. If you have not reached the standard required for the award of MSc, you may be awarded the Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate if you reach an appropriate standard. The dissertation/project, which shall be on an approved topic, shall be submitted following successful completion of the taught component of the degree programme.

For further information on degree requirements please read the Examinations section of the handbook.

Course structure

MSc Economics

  Pre-Term Autumn (Term 1) Spring (Term 2) Summer (Term 3)
Core   EC901 Economic Analysis (44 CATS): EC9011 Microeconomics and EC9012 Macroeconomics    
Introductory Maths and Statistics EC902 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics A (50 CATS) OR EC910 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics B (50 CATS)  
    Research Methods  EC959 Dissertation (36 CATS)
Optional     Three modules (18 CATS), no more than one IB-coded module, from:
  • EC916 Topics in Global Finance
  • EC924 Monetary Economics
  • EC931 International Trade
  • EC941 Game Theory
  • EC943 Industrial Economics
  •  EC966 Labour Economics
  • EC977 Panel Data Econometrics
  • EC981 Topics in Public Finance
  • EC982 Topics in Development and Transition
  • EC984 Experimental Economics
  • EC988 Economics of Financial Markets
  • EC989 Behavioural Economics
  • EC990 Topics in Applied Macroeconomics
  • EC991 Topics in Applied Microeconomics
  • EC993 Public Policy in Developing Countries
  • EC994 Applications of Data Science
  • IB967 International Financial Markets*
  • IB9Y2 Behavioural Finance*
  • IB9X7 Derivatives Securities*

* Limited places (15 CATS). Please be aware that the Warwick Business School modules are challenging technical courses. You should have a strong mathematics and statistics or econometrics ability.

 


MSc Economics and International Financial Economics

  Pre-Term Autumn (Term 1) Spring (Term 2) Summer (Term 3)
Core   EC901 Economic Analysis (44 CATS): EC9011 Microeconomics and EC9012 Macroeconomics    
Introductory Maths and Statistics EC902 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics A (50 CATS) OR EC910 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics B (50 CATS)  
    Research Methods  EC959 Dissertation (36 CATS)
Optional     Three modules (18 CATS), including at least one from LIST A and not more than one IB-coded module:

LIST A
  • EC916 Topics in Global Finance
  • EC924 Monetary Economics
  • EC981 Topics in Public Finance
  • EC988 Economics of Financial Markets

LIST B
  • EC931 International Trade
  • EC941 Game Theory
  • EC982 Topics in Development and Transition
  • EC989 Behavioural Economics
  • EC990 Topics in Applied Macroeconomics
  • EC991 Topics in Applied Microeconomics
  • EC993 Public Policy in Developing Countries
  • EC994 Applications of Data Science
  • IB967 International Financial Markets*
  • IB9Y2 Behavioural Finance*
  • IB9X7 Derivatives Securities*

* Limited places (15 CATS). Please be aware that the Warwick Business School modules are challenging technical courses. You should have a strong mathematics and statistics or econometrics ability.

 

MSc in Behavioural & Economic Science (Economics Track)

  Pre-Term Autumn (Term 1) Spring (Term 2) Summer (Term 3)
Core   EC901 Economic Analysis (22 CATS): Microeconomics    
Introductory Maths and Statistics EC907 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics A (30 CATS) OR EC987 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics B (30 CATS)    
  PS922 Issues in Psychological Science (15 CATS)    
  PS923 Methods and Analysis in Behavioural Science (15 CATS)    
      PS916 Research Project (30 CATS)
Optional     Five modules from:
  • EC984 Experimental Economics
  • EC989 Behavioural Economics
  • PS918 Psychological Models of Choice
  • PS919 Behavioural Change: Nudging and Persuasion
  • PS927 Neuroeconomics
  • IB9AN Principles of Cognition
  • IB9Y2 Behavioural Finance*

* Limited places. Please be aware that IB9Y2 is a challenging technical module. You should have a strong mathematics and statistics or econometrics ability.

Teaching hours

Module Description Hours*
EC9011
Economic Analysis Microeconomics
Lectures: Four hours per week for nine weeks in the Autumn Term.
Classes: One class per week over eight weeks in the Autumn Term.
44
EC9012
Economic Analysis Macroeconomics
Lectures: Four hours per week over nine weeks in the Autumn Term.
Classes: One class per week over eight weeks in the Autumn Term.
44
EC902
Quantitative Methods:
Econometrics A

Introductory Maths and Stats: a number of lectures and classes held within the two weeks prior to the start of the Autumn Term.

Lectures: Two hours per week for 18 weeks in the Autumn and Spring Terms.
Classes: One class per week over 16 weeks in Autumn and Spring Terms. Two classes in the Spring Term for project work.

42



54



EC910
Quantitative Methods:
Econometrics B

Introductory Maths and Stats: a number of lectures and classes held within the two weeks prior to the start of the Autumn Term.

Lectures: Two hours per week for 18 weeks in the Autumn and Spring Terms.
Classes: One class per week over 16 weeks in Autumn and Spring Terms. Two classes in the Spring Term for project work.

42



54

EC907
Quantitative Methods:
Econometrics A (for MSc in Behavioural and Economic Science - Economics Track students)

Introductory Maths and Stats: a number of lectures and classes held within the two weeks prior to the start of the Autumn Term.

Lectures: Two hours per week for nine weeks in the Autumn Term.
Classes: One class per week over eight weeks in the Autumn Term.

42



26


EC987
Quantitative Methods:
Econometrics B (for MSc in Behavioural and Economic Science - Economics Track students)

Introductory Maths and Stats: a number of lectures and classes held within the two weeks prior to the start of the Autumn Term.

Lectures: Two hours per week for nine weeks in the Autumn Term.
Classes: One class per week over eight weeks in the Autumn Term.

42



26

EC959 Dissertation: Research Methods A number of workshops and lectures in the Spring and Summer Terms. 13
PS922
Issues in Psychological Science
Lectures and classes: Two hours per week over 10 weeks in the Autumn Term.
Classes: Two hours per week over five weeks in the Autumn Term.
30
PS923
Methods and Analysis in Behavioural Science
Lectures and classes: Two hours per week over 10 weeks in the Autumn Term.
Classes: Two hours per week over five weeks in the Autumn Term.
30
Optional modules Lectures: Two hours per week over nine weeks in the Spring Term.
Classes: to be confirmed
18

'Classes', 'Seminars' and 'Tutorials' are all different names for the same things – teaching in small groups.
* Hours indicated are approximate contact hours.

Online module registration

When you arrive at Warwick in September you will need to register your module/exam choices for the 2018/2019 academic year using the eVision Module Registration (eMR) system. The system will be open from Monday 24 September to Friday 19 October 2018.

You will then be able to see a personalised page where you can view any modules that may be core for your course, select any optional modules and confirm your choices. Please note that your choices are subject to checking and approval by the Department.

The eMR system will also re-open at the start of the Spring Term in order for you to review and confirm your choices of optional modules by Friday 25 January 2019.

You are not permitted to change between two modules that take place in the same term after eMR has closed in the relevant term. You are advised to make any changes as early as possible, as you may find it very difficult to catch up. If you do change your modules, it is your responsibility to catch up on any missed work and this cannot be used as a mitigating circumstance, should your performance in any module be adversely affected.

Before the end of week 17 of the Spring Term, it is your responsibility to make sure you are registered for the correct optional modules on eMR. If you fail to do this, there can be serious consequences in terms of which exams you are required to sit.

Econometrics A or Econometrics B?

All MSc students (except those registered for MSc in Behavioural and Economic Science Economics Track, please see below) are asked to choose between EC902 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics A and EC910 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics B.

Econometrics A covers fundamental econometric research skills. If you have done a reasonable amount of econometrics previously (as in a typical undergraduate econometrics module) you should take Econometrics B. You should note that you may not necessarily find that Econometrics A is 'easier' than Econometrics B. More details about the two modules are given on the MSc Modules webpages.

To take Econometrics B you should be familiar with the following topics (or be prepared to fill in any minor gaps on your own):

  • Ordinary Least Squares
  • Tests of linear restrictions (F-tests, t-tests, chi-squared tests)
  • Dummy variables as explanatory variables
  • Heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation
  • Exogeneity and IV estimation.

For those students taking the MSc Behavioural and Economic Science (Economics Track), there is a choice between EC907 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics A and EC987 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics B. These modules offer the same distinction as set out above for the Econometrics modules taken by all other MSc students, except that EC907 and EC987 are one-term-only modules, running in the Autumn Term. You should choose EC987 if you have already gained a reasonable knowledge of Econometrics.

Examinations for the Econometrics modules will be held in May. The Department’s deadline for finalising your choice of econometrics module on the University’s eMR system is Friday 19 October 2018 (week three).

Optional modules

The MSc Economics and the MSc Economics and International Financial Economics require you to take three optional modules, while the MSc Behavioural and Economic Science (Economics Track) programme requires you to take five optional modules. All optional modules will be taken in the Spring Term.

You may also wish to sample or audit further options (that is, sit in on the lectures) if you can find the time. However, please do not ask to be examined for more than three optional modules as departmental policy does not allow for this, for the simple reason that our MSc programmes are already very intensive. Should you wish to audit an additional optional module please speak first with the module leader and then inform the Postgraduate Office if permission is granted.

We are intending to offer the options listed on the MSc Modules webpages. Although we try to run all optional modules, occasionally, we have to withdraw a module due to availability of staff or the number of students who choose it. If this is the case, you will be informed as soon as possible.

Students of the MSc Economics and the MSc Economics and International Financial Economics may be permitted to take one of three Business School modules, namely; International Financial Markets (IB967), Derivative Securities (IB9X7) and Behavioural Finance (IB9Y2). Students of the MSc Behavioural and Economic Science (Economics Track) may be permitted to take Behavioural Finance (IB9Y2). Please note that places on these modules are limited and a ballot may be applied in case of excess demand. If you choose a Business School module you may not then change this module once you have been allocated a place. You should also be aware that these are challenging technical modules and you must have a strong mathematics and statistics or econometrics ability to take them. Please avoid these modules if you have done little maths or statistics/econometrics before your MSc and do not choose them if you find Introductory Maths and Statistics and the Autumn Term core modules difficult.

We would not recommend taking an optional module in the Autumn Term when the core module teaching takes place. Please see the Director of Graduate Studies (Taught Degrees) if you are contemplating this.

There will be a Presentation of Optional Modules Meeting on Friday 5 October 2018 in week one of the Autumn Term in order to aid your choice. Further information will be disseminated via email.

Timetable

Please note that the timetable is subject to change at short notice so we do not print it in this handbook. Your individual timetable of lectures and classes can be viewed online using Tabula. It will be complete when you are registered for all modules, core and optional, and you have signed up to your module Support and Feedback classes and any other timetabled teaching. Please make sure that you check your timetable regularly. A summary timetable for your course can also be viewed on the MSc website. We will notify you by email if any lectures or classes need to be cancelled at short notice, and we will also update Tabula.

Teaching sessions normally begin at five minutes past the hour and end at five minutes to the hour in order to allow people to enter and vacate the room.

Lectures and classes take place in a variety of places across campus so make sure you keep a campus map handy. The University of Warwick interactive campus map is a great way to find your location and help plan your route.

Support and Feedback classes

'Module Support and Feedback classes', 'seminars', 'classes', 'tutorials' and 'supervisions' are all different names for essentially the same thing; compulsory teaching in small groups. For core modules you will have Support and Feedback classes to go over topics within your module in much more detail than in lectures. These are essentially a feedback session and should be used as such. You are in much smaller groups than in lectures, so this is a good opportunity to discuss questions and concepts and receive feedback on your approach to problems and understanding key concepts. Your preparation for module Support and Feedback classes and participation in the class discussions are essential to your economics education.

Each class is managed by a tutor who will:

  • invite you to raise problems
  • provide feedback on your understanding of material
  • lead discussion
  • invite you to lead discussion, usually after some preparation
  • assign and grade coursework
  • record your attendance, participation and marks
  • offer you any individual advice.

Class tutors also have feedback hours every week during term time. It is important that you take the opportunity to clarify any areas of confusion and develop your understanding of the topics by further reading and discussion with your peers and tutors.

Class attendance

You can sign up for classes by logging into Tabula. Please note that you are required to attend all of your classes.

At each class your tutor will record your attendance or absence and input this data into Tabula. If you have been marked 'absent' you will see an 'Absent' flag appear on your Tabula page next to the class in question. It is then your responsibility to explain your absence, providing evidence as to why you could not attend. For short-lived illnesses, you should provide a self-certification form as evidence, which can be downloaded from the MSc forms webpage. Please note that the Department will monitor the number and frequency of episodes of self-certified illness. The Postgraduate Teaching and Learning Manager (Taught Degrees) will decide whether or not the reason is valid and either condone or uphold your absence accordingly. If you believe an error has been made, you should contact the Postgraduate Office immediately.

In order to keep class sizes stable, you are not permitted to swap your group unless you have the prior permission of the Postgraduate Office and you have a compelling reason, like a timetable class. If you attend a different group to the one to which you have been allocated, you will simply be marked as absent from your group. Your class tutors do not have the authority to give you permission to swap between groups.

Reading Lists, lecture handouts and exam papers

Copies of reading lists and other module handouts are normally distributed during lectures and classes.

Many lecturers place notes and other module documentation on Moodle.

Exam papers for the last couple of years are available on the University website.

Recording lectures

Many Economics modules use Lecture Capture, which is supported via IT Services. Lecture Capture allows you to download and/or view an mp4 file which should include sound from the relevant lecture and may show accompanying projected images used in the lecture (slides and/or visualizer). The recordings will be published in Moodle as soon as possible after the lecture and will be retained until the end of the academic year.

Lecture Capture is a complementary study-aid for review and revision purposes. It can help accommodate different learning styles and assist students who do not have English as their first language. However, Lecture Capture is designed to augment the lecture rather than replace it. It is not a substitute for lecture attendance. While every effort is made to ensure the service works efficiently, it is not infallible and the Department and IT Services cannot guarantee that Lecture Capture will operate as intended for each lecture. It is possible that some content might not be captured or teaching staff may choose to not permit recordings to be made. Therefore you should not rely on Lecture Capture as a source of lecture material.

Recordings in the lecture capture system are intended for use by students registered on the relevant module and should be clearly marked as Warwick resources. Access is limited to the staff and students of the University and you are not allowed to share recordings further.

We do not permit personal capture of lectures or classes without explicit approval of the lecturer or tutor concerned.

The University's Lecture Capture Policy and Policy on Recording of Lectures by Students provides further information on recording lectures.

Changing programmes of study

Almost all students complete the degree course on which they were first registered. However, a few find that they wish to change degree course. You should not be surprised to feel some occasional doubts about whether or not you are following the right degree course.

If you have persistent doubts about whether you are on the right degree course you should first consult with your Personal Tutor or go along to our Wellbeing daily drop-in sessions. If you decide that you wish to change to another degree course you should make your request by email to Jennifer Smith, Director of Graduate Studies (Taught Degrees).

Transfers involving other departments are never automatic. All transfers to degree courses outside Economics require the specific agreement of the department to which you wish to transfer. Within the Department of Economics, it is sometimes possible to transfer from one of the degree courses to another early in the Autumn Term (no later than the end of week 3). Please be aware that:

  • It is normally possible to change between the MSc Economics and MSc Economics and International Financial Economics.
  • It is sometimes possible to change from MSc Behavioural and Economic Science (Economics Track) to MSc Economics or MSc Economics and International Financial Economics; this will depend on the modules you have taken at undergraduate level and transfer requests will need to be approved by an Admissions Tutor.
  • You will not be permitted to change from an MSc degree to the MRes/PhD in Economics. Guidance on how to apply for a place on the MRes/PhD programme after completing your MSc degree can be found on our admissions website.

Temporary withdrawal

A temporary withdrawal is an approved period of time when you are not studying for your award and it is governed by University Regulation 36.1. You may request, in the first instance, a maximum of 12 months temporary withdrawal from your course of study. In order to make a temporary withdrawal request, you should first talk with your Personal Tutor or Director of Academic and Pastoral Support, and then complete a Temporary Withdrawal Request form, which should be submitted along with the relevant medical or other evidence. The Director of Graduate Studies (Taught Degrees) will recommend that the request be approved or declined and if it is recommended for approval, the request will be sent to the Academic Office for final approval or decline.

You should inform Student Finance of your temporary withdrawal once it has been confirmed.

During a period of temporary withdrawal, you are not permitted to attend lectures or classes. However, in order to help you prepare for your return to study or sitting examinations, access to University IT facilities and the Library will normally continue during these periods.

Note: If you are a Tier 4 Visa holder you should seek advice from an Immigration Adviser as temporary withdrawal will affect your visa.

If you are returning part-way through an academic year, you will be assessed on the basis of the syllabus you have personally followed during your period of study. If the syllabus of a module has changed during your absence, then you will be set a special examination paper which covers the material you have followed.

Permanent withdrawal

If you feel that you would like to permanently withdraw from your course, whether after a period of temporary withdrawal or not, please make an appointment to see your Personal Tutor or Director of Academic and Pastoral Support. If, after discussion, you are resolved to withdraw from your course, you must complete the online Permanent Withdrawal Request Form. The Director of Graduate Studies (Taught Degrees) will approve the form and the Academic Office will be informed of your departure. Please note that you should seek advice from the Student Finance Office on any implications for your fee payments and also Warwick Accommodation. International Students should contact the International Student Office for details on visa implications.

Regulation 36.4 explains the grounds and procedure for requiring you to withdraw temporarily or permanently.

Private tutoring

We actively discourage private tutoring arrangements between undergraduate/postgraduate students and Teaching Assistants, Teaching Fellows and academic staff, but do not prohibit it.

If you are experiencing study difficulties are encouraged to make full use of University and Departmental resources, such as advice from their personal tutor, year tutor, and other academic staff, and the guidance provided by Student Careers and Skills, which should be sufficient to meet your needs.

However, we recognise that we are unlikely to be able to prevent private tutoring arrangements; hence the Department imposes the following regulations:

  • A Teaching Assistant, Teaching Fellow or member of academic staff employed in the Department of Economics is not permitted to tutor privately on an undergraduate or postgraduate module on which they are employed to teach or have previously been employed to teach
  • A Teaching Assistant, Teaching Fellow or member of academic staff who tutors privately is not permitted to access any materials not available to other students registered for the module
  • Any private tutoring arrangement must not be conducted on University premises
  • The Teaching Assistant, Teaching Fellow or member of academic staff must assume responsibility for ensuring the tutee is aware that the tutoring arrangement does not form part of the tutee’s Warwick degree, that it is not governed by any of the University’s or Department’s quality assurance mechanisms, and that the Department will not be accountable for any misinformation given out as part of the private arrangement.

Monitoring Points

As a student, you have some responsibilities to the Department, just as we have responsibilities to you. We want to be sure that you are coping with your work and not falling behind, so we ask that you meet a number of ‘Monitoring Points’ throughout the academic year.

As you progress through the academic year you will be able to see on your Tabula page how many Monitoring Points you have successfully made and how many you have missed. Please inform the Postgraduate Office should you believe a mistake to have been made in your Monitoring Points record.

Please be aware that you will be contacted should we become concerned about your missed Monitoring Points.

  • After three Monitoring Points are missed we will contact you to investigate whether you are having any problems that are preventing you from fully engaging with your course.
  • After four Monitoring Points are missed we may refer you to the relevant professional within the University welfare system who could help you, such as the Dean of Students, the Disability Coordinator or Mental Health Coordinator, as appropriate.
  • After five Monitoring Points are missed you will be contacted to make you aware that you are at serious risk of being recommended for termination of your registration at the University.
  • After six Monitoring Points are missed the Department is able to invoke Regulation 36 to begin termination of registration proceedings and your case is handed over to the Academic Office.

International Students should be particularly aware of the consequences of missing Monitoring Points: the Academic Office is obliged to report to the Home Office UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) if any Tier 4 students have been found not to be engaging with and attending their degree course. This will normally lead to the curtailment of their visas.

MSc Economics, MSc EIFE - Year 1
Contact Point Description Timing
Autumn term
1. Attendance at Departmental enrolment Pre-sessional
2. Attendance at test for EC902/EC910 Week 1
3. Meeting with Personal Tutor Week 2 - 6
4. Attendance at a class for EC901 Week 4
5. Attendance at a class for EC901 Week 7
6. Submission of Economics module evaluation Week 10
Spring Term
7. Attendance at an examination Week 15
8. Attendance at a class for EC902/EC910 Week 18
9. Attendance at a class for EC902/EC910 Week 21
10. Submission of Economics module evaluation Week 24
Summer Term
11. Attendance at an examination Weeks 32 - 33
12. Submission of dissertation proposal Week 39
Summer Vacation
13. Submission of dissertation or attend resit examination(s) Week 50
MSc Economics, MSc EIFE - Year 2 (March dissertation deadline)
Contact Point Description Timing
Autumn term
1. Contact with PG Office Week 1
2. Contact with PG Office Week 5
3. Contact with PG Office Week 10
Spring Term
4. Contact with PG Office Week 15
5. Contact with PG Office Week 20

6.

Submission of Dissertation


Week 24

MSc Economics, MSc EIFE - Year 2 (September dissertation deadline)

Contact Point Description Timing
Summer Term/Vacation
1. Contact with PG Office Week 37-40
2. Contact with PG Office Week 45
3. Submission of Dissertation Week 50


MSc BES (Economics Track) - Year 1

Contact Point Description Timing
Autumn term
1. Attendance at Departmental enrolment Pre-sessional
2. Attendance at test for EC907/EC987 Week 1
3. Meeting with Personal Tutor Week 2 - 6
4. Attendance at a class for EC901 Week 4
5. Attendance at a class for EC901 Week 7
6. Submission of Economics module evaluation Week 10
Spring Term
7. Attendance at an examination Week 15
8. Attendance at a class for EC984/EC989 Week 18
9. Attendance at a class for EC984/EC989 Week 22
10. Submission of Economics module evaluation Week 24
Summer Term
11. Attendance at an examination Week 30
12. Meeting with project supervisor Week 39 - 41
Summer Vacation
13. Submission of project or attend resit examination Week 48 or
Week 50
MSc BES (Economics Track) - Year 2 (March project deadline)
Contact Point Description Timing
Autumn term
1. Contact with PG Office Week 1
2. Contact with PG Office Week 5
3. Contact with PG Office Week 10
Spring Term
4. Contact with PG Office Week 15
5. Contact with PG Office Week 20

6.

Submission of Project

Week 24

MSc BES (Economics Track) - Year 2 (September project deadline)
Contact Point Description Timing
Summer Term/Vacation
1. Contact with PG Office Week 37-40
2. Contact with PG Office Week 45
3. Submission of Project Week 48