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Frequently Asked Questions

We've put together a list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) below relating to our MSc courses, which should help you clarify our expectations as well as give you some information on how to prepare for your new course, once you decide to accept your offer.

Pre-Application

You will find details of our entry requirements here.


You must have, or expect to obtain, a degree specialising mainly in economics of first or upper second class honours standard from a British university or the equivalent from an overseas university. This means you should have achieved a good standard in undergraduate courses in microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics/economic statistics at an intermediate level.


We offer 3 MSc programmes in the Department of Economics: MSc Economics, MSc Economics and International Financial Economics and MSc Behavioural and Economic Science (Economics Track). We also contribute to the teaching on the MSc Finance and Economics offered by the Warwick Business School.


We don't have an official deadline for applications but places on our courses are limited so you should submit your application as early as possible to avoid disappointment.


In order for an application to be considered all candidates will need to upload:

  • A copy of your university transcript – that is a complete list of all modules taken with awarded marks.
    • If you have taken modules but haven’t any marks yet then we still need to see a list of the modules you are working on. Most universities will offer a ‘confirmed modules’ or ‘final year modules’ list for their students
    • You may be able to get a HEAR certificate from your University (Higher Education Achievement Record). This can also be uploaded
  • At least one supporting reference – either from your university (academic) or work place.
    • The academic reference needs to be written by a tutor who knows your work, such as a personal tutor or someone who has taught/supervised you.
    • A reference from your work place needs to come from your line or department manager
    • You need to provide a valid email address for the referee and the University will email them directly to request a reference on your behalf
    • It is the applicant’s responsibility to approach the referee and request their contact details

If you have been out of higher education for more than a couple of years the University will accept a reference from your workplace

  • The reference needs to be from your line or department manager; someone who knows your and what you have worked on
  • Note the university cannot accept references from friends, family or work colleagues

No.

  • Applications without supporting documentation will be put on hold
  • You will be emailed to remind you to upload your supporting documents.
  • If after 3 reminders you do not supply the documents requested, your application will be automatically rejected.

If you do not have any of the documentation you may need to contact your previous University to supply copies.


Your personal statement should be about 500 – 1000 words in length and explain:

  • Why you want to undertake postgraduate study
  • Your reasons for choosing the specific course
  • The relevance of your first degree and the academic skills you have gained
  • The relevance of any work/work experience you may have

The supporting reference needs to be written by an academic tutor who has worked with you. For example a class tutor, dissertation supervisor or personal tutor. If you have been out of higher education for more than two years you may ask your line/department manager at work to write a reference on your behalf. Some items they may wish to include:

  • Why you are suitable for this course
  • What academic projects/modules you have worked well on in the past
  • Estimated degree result
  • What job-related projects you have worked on

The department normally cannot confirm admission to the University for any overseas or EU applicant unless they can submit a recent and valid English Language Test.

  • Certain English-speaking countries or institutions are exempt
  • If you have studied recently in an English-speaking country and have been taught at undergraduate level you may not have to submit an English Language test.

Further details about English Language entry requirements can be found here.


No:

  • The pre-sessional English language classes can only help improve English; it is not a substitute for an IELTS or other English Language test certificate
  • If your English Test score narrowly misses the acceptance threshold you may be able to attend the pre-sessional English Language course in order to improve your score
  • Note that the pre-sessional English courses are payable separately

The best way is to upload your transcript as a PDF:

  • Scan your transcript if you have a hardcopy and upload it as a PDF file
  • Simply upload the transcript or HEAR (Higher Education Achievement Record) document if your University issues them as PDF
  • The department will accept other formats (such as .jpg) but it needs to be clear; if we cannot read the document the department will put your application on hold until a legible copy is supplied.

Yes. If you are a student at Warwick already you will still need to:

  • Fill in an application form
  • Supply a copy of a transcript and/or HEAR (Higher Education Achievement Record) document
  • Nominate a tutor to supply an academic reference

No, but you can upload your test result if you want.

  • Taking a GRE/GMAT test is not currently a course entry requirement
  • If you choose to upload a GRE/GMAT score the Admissions tutor will have more information in order to make a decision

Post-Application

This step-by-step guide by the university will help you know what to do once you have received an offer.


We have a very small number of scholarships each year. You can read further details about the available schemes on our scholarships pages. We offer special discounts to former students as part of the Warwick Alumni Discount Scheme or the new Graduate Award Scheme 2020.

Offer Holders


The best way to find the answer to your question related to Accommodation is to view the Accommodation webpages. You can also sign up for a Live Chat with the Accommodation Office if you are unable to find an answer to your question, or get in touch directly via accommodation@warwick.ac.uk.

Economics at Warwick

We are planning a flexible blend of face to face and online learning for next academic year, so that you can still expect to receive the high standard of teaching and student experience that you expect. The methods of delivery of our MSc programmes may be different to previous years, but we will not compromise on the quality of teaching, learning and assessment that you will receive.


MSc courses start on Monday 21 September 2020 and your first subject is Introductory Maths and Statistics, which is known as the pre-sessional course because it begins two weeks before the rest of your MSc programme. This year we will be delivering the Introductory Maths and Statistics Course entirely online and we will not expect you to arrive on campus for Monday 21 September. As an offer holder, you will receive further details about how to join this course as soon as we have all elements of it finalised.

Teaching will start on Monday 5 October 2020 and we are hoping that some face to face teaching will be able to take place by this time with social distancing measures in place.


The blended delivery of teaching will be a mixture of face to face teaching where social distancing can be observed (most likely for smaller classes and seminars) and online delivery (most likely to be for large lectures where it would be difficult for us to put social distancing measures in place).


The term dates for 2020/2021 are:

Term
Dates
Autumn Term Monday 5 October 2020 – Saturday 12 December 2020
Spring Term Monday 11 January 2021 – Saturday 20 March 2021
Summer Term Monday 26 April 2021 – Saturday 3 July 2021

Teaching is mainly carried out through lectures and seminars which will be delivered via blended learning (see FAQ on blended learning above). Your dissertation work will normally be individually supervised on a one-to-one basis. You will have an average of eight–ten hours of lectures and three–five hours of classes per week. You will also be expected to undertake your own independent study, and there are a range of facilities and resources to help you further your own research and learning, and become an independent, active learner. The Department is open and welcoming, encouraging one-to-one interaction between our world-leading academics and our students. In the summer term and summer vacation your independent study time will increase as you prepare for exams and complete your research dissertation or project.


Assessment is through formal examinations, coursework and an individually supervised research dissertation for MSc students. Feedback is a vital part of the assessment process, as it helps you reach your full potential, by identifying the strengths and weaknesses of your work and the actions that are needed to develop your understanding and enhance your performance. Feedback is provided in a variety of ways, including: grades and comments on marked work, solutions to problem sets, verbal feedback from tutors and peers in classes, Advice and Feedback hours with academic staff and personal tutor meetings. Please note that some of the feedback you will receive will be via online methods (e.g. the Advice and Feedback hours may be delivered face to face or via online platform like MS Teams).


Detailed reading lists are given on each module website. We have also provided for you the MSc Resources page where you can find links to useful resources available online as well as book recommendations from our academics which you can find under the Virtual Bookshelf.


Your personalised timetable will be complete when you are registered for all modules, core and optional, and you have been allocated to your lectures, seminars and other small group classes. Your core modules will be registered for you and you will be able to choose your optional modules via the online Module Registration Manager (eMR) from September each academic year.


You will be asked you to complete your provisional module registrations by the end of week 3 of the autumn term. We offer a presentation for Economics optional modules to help you learn more about your module choices. In the spring term you will be able to sample optional modules before finalising your choices by the end of week 17.


For information on skills development and careers, please see the following page.


The Department's current policy is to have lectures video recorded and available to students online. We also use a virtual learning environment where all module resources are posted including lecture notes. Please note that in the academic year 2020-21 we will be providing a blend of face to face and online teaching. See above point about blended learning.


Our current cohort of MSc students (2019 entry) has 9 percent of students from the UK and the EU; 17 per cent from India, 57 per cent from China and 17 per cent from the rest of the world.


Optional modules are reviewed each year however you can view the current list of approved optional modules on the MSc modules page.

Life at Warwick

Yes, there are some opportunities for part-time jobs advertised by our employment agency called Unitemps.


We are currently planning a blend of online and face-to-face learning with the aim of being flexible enough to meet the needs of our students during the current worldwide uncertainty. We will communicate further details of our plans as soon as they are finalised. See above point on what we mean by blended teaching delivery.


There are approximately 300 different societies to choose from so it will be up to you and depend on your interests and time management skills as to how many you can join.

In the Department, we have a close relationship with Warwick Economics Society, Warwick Economics Summit, Rethinking Economics and the Warwick Women in Economics society.

Can't find the answer to your question?

If you can't find the answer to your question, please get in touch with us.

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