Skip to main content

Previous IKON Seminars

 

IKON Distinguished Speaker Series

Speaker:

Trish Reay (University of Alberta School of Business & Warwick Business School)

Title: 'How can you get a leopard to change its spots? Institutional logics and physician role identity'
Date: Thursday 28 November
Time: 2.00pm - 3.30pm
Venue: Room B2.13 (WBS Scarman Road Building, Warwick University Main Campus)
Abstract & Biography:

In this paper, we draw on the concept of a constellation of logics to understand how a new professional role identity for physicians was developed. During the time of our study, we observed that physicians changed their role identity at the micro and macro (field) level from "autonomous practitioner" to "head of the team." Our data suggest that the actions of health care managers were critical to the change process. This development of a new professional role identity occurred within the context of an Alberta government-driven change initiative to create a multi-disciplinary team approach to primary health care. We contribute to theory by identifying four microprocesses that helped to reshape the meaning of professionalism by altering the relationships among the relevant institutional logics guiding physician role identity.

Dr. Trish Reay is an Associate Professor in Strategic Management and Organization at the University of Alberta School of Business where she teaches MBA and Bachelor of Commerce courses in Organizational Change, Implementing Public Policy and Family Business. She also holds a part-time affiliation as Professor in Entrepreneurship and Innovation at Warwick Business School. She is the Academic Director for the Centre for Effective Business Management of Addiction Treatment at the Alberta School of Business, and she has recently completed her term as Division Chair for the Health Care Management division of the Academy of Management.

Her research interests include organizational and institutional change, as well as identity and identity work. She has conducted research in the area of family business dynamics and in health system restructuring and change. In the healthcare context, her research has focused on regionalization, professional work, primary health care reform, and more recently on interdisciplinary teamwork in mental health and addictions. Her work has been published in journals such as, Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Management Studies, Organization Studies, Family Business Review, Health Care Management Review and Work and Occupations.

 

  IKON Distinguished Speaker Series
Speaker: Steve Woolgar (Professor of Marketing and Head of the Science & Technology Studies research group at Saïd Business School, University of Oxford)
Title: 'Mundane Governance: How Ordinary Objects Come to Matter'
Date: Wednesday 8 May
Time: 4.00pm - 5.30pm
Venue: Ramphal Building Room R1.15, University of Warwick main campus
Abstract & Biography: What is to be made of the outcry when newly issued recycling "wheelie" bins are discovered to contain microchips for weighing and evaluating householders' rubbish? The angry accusations that speed cameras are generating excessive income for the government? The consternation at the measures taken by airports to heighten security in the wake of the increased threat of terrorist attacks? These widespread reactions to ordinary events and everyday phenomena share a common theme. They all embody concerns about the ways in which our lives are increasingly regulated and controlled in relation to ordinary objects and technologies.In his talk, based on his forthcoming book 'Mundane Governance: Ontology and Accountability' (with Daniel Neyland; OUP), Steve Woolgar takes these concerns as the starting point for exploring the ways in which relations of governance and accountability in contemporary life are organized around ordinary, everyday, pervasive objects and technologies. In contrast to the contemporary literature on governance, he argues for the importance of examining how accountability relations are enacted on the ground. In particular, it is crucial to understand how governance and accountability arise in relation to the achieved ontologies of ordinary everyday objects and technologies. The focus on ontology draws attention to the social and cultural practices whereby the nature and existence of ordinary things come to matter.
  Steve Woolgar is Professor of Marketing and Head of the Science and Technology Studies research group at Saïd Business School, University of Oxford. Before moving to Oxford in 2000, he was Professor of Sociology, Head of the Department of Human Sciences and Director of CRICT (Centre for Research into Innovation, Culture and Technology) at Brunel University. He took his BA (First Class Honours), MA and PhD from Emmanuel College, Cambridge University. He has since held Visiting Appointments at McGill University, MIT, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, Paris, and UC San Diego. He is the winner of a Fulbright Scholarship, a Fulbright Senior Scholarship, and an ESRC Senior Research Fellowship. From 1997-2002 he was Director of the ESRC Programme Virtual Society?- the social science of electronic technologies, a £3½ m venture comprising 22 research projects throughout the UK. In 2008 he was named winner of the J. D. Bernal Prize.Steve has published widely in science and technology studies, social problems and social theory. Several of his books, including Laboratory Life (with Bruno Latour) and The Machine at Work (with Keith Grint), are considered modern classics. His work has been translated into Chinese, Dutch, French, Greek, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish and Turkish.He has served on various European and UK government advisory bodies, including Foresight Panels and Ministerial Advisory Groups; as an advisor to the Research Councils of Denmark, Netherlands and Norway; and as Fellow of the Sunningdale Institute, the UK Cabinet Office think tank on Public Service Management.

 

Speaker:

Paul Carlile (School Of Management, Boston University)

Title: Expanding Innovation: Designing for Participation in an Open World
Date: Friday 26 April 2013
Venue: Room E2.02 (WBS Social Studies Boardroom – Warwick University Main Campus)
Time: 2.30pm - 4.00pm
Abstract & Biography:

Clay Shirky’s clear pronouncement of “here comes everybody” was meant to provoke, yet its practical implications have not been systematically considered.

In this talk I will begin to address these practical issues by focusing on the implications of how do we design for participation in a more open world by examining a variety of circumstances where openness is being played out: everything from software, to clothing, to crafts, to engineering and to drug development. What I have found is that openness is forcing us to fundamentally rethink how participation has been designed in organizations for the last 200 years. Not only who is participating is expanding, but why they are participating is becoming more diverse and how they are participating is becoming more complicated. At its core value is becoming more varied and its evaluation is becoming more dynamic and complex to support. From cases and concepts discussed I will focus on this engine of value and (e)valuation to outline a design approach for rethinking participation to set free its greater potential for innovation in an open world.

Paul R Carlile is an Associate Professor of Management and Information Systems at Boston University’s School of Management. A primary focus in Paul’s work has been understanding the challenges and solutions to moving knowledge across specialized domains. His work has been published in Administrative Science Quarterly, Harvard Business Review, Management Science, Organization Science and several other journals.

Paul received his Ph.D. in Organization Studies at the University of Michigan; his MA in Organizational Behavior and B.A in Anthropology and Philosophy at Brigham Young University.

 

Speaker:

Rick Iedema (University of Technology Sydney)

Title:

“Anthropotechnics – Practising the improbable”

Date:

Thursday 26 April 2012

Venue:

Room M2 WBS Teaching Centre – Ground Floor (Warwick University Main Campus)

Time:

2.00pm - 4.00pm

Abstract & Biography:

This talk reflects on the ideas discussed in Peter Sloterdijk’s recent book Du muβt dein Leben ändern: Über Anthropotechnik. The main thesis of the book is that humankind is entangled in aspirational imperatives that drive people to pursue the ‘not-yet-done/thought/said’ as ways of developing immunity against adversity. I then turn to health care and instrumentalise Sloterdijk’s ‘aspirational imperative’ for how we understand, teach and realise patient safety. Using filmed examples from our hospital-based video-ethnographic projects to bring to the fore both the social and the adaptive dimensions of safety, I conclude that the visualization of practice is a critical anthropotechnic resource for intensifying frontline practitioners’ adaptive capacity, for enabling them to appreciate the significance of experimenting with the improbable, and for developing an immunity to the rising complexity of contemporary health care.

Rick Iedema is a Research Professor in Organisational Communication, at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, and Director of the Centre for Health Communication at the University of Technology Sydney. His research focuses on how clinicians communicate about their work with other clinicians, with patients and with their families. His 2006-7 work on Open Disclosure (clinicians disclosing incidents to patients and families) led to Australian Health Ministers' agreeing to nationalise Open Disclosure policy. His 2008 work on Clinical Handover is drawing international interest from hospitals and health research organisations in the Netherlands, USA and the UK. In seeking to problematise conventional social scientific approaches to analysis and knowledge production, his work draws on film-making of in situ communication processes, and involves practitioners and patients in making sense of the processes thus captured, and collaboratively imagining and realising new process possibilities. His most recent book publications include Discourses of Hospital Communication (Palgrave, edited, 2007), Identity Trouble (with Carmen Coulthard, Palgrave, edited, 2008) and Managing Processes in Health Services (with Ros Sorensen, Elsevier, edited, 2008). He publishes his articles in, among others, Social Science & Medicine, Sociology of Health & Illness and Organization Studies.

 
Speaker:
Emmanouil Gkeredakis
 
(IKON, Warwick Business School)
Title:
Using ‘Evidence’ in Commissioning Decisions: Insights from a large qualitative study in the English NHS
Date:
Wednesday 7 December 2011
Venue:
S0.98, Social Sciences Building, University of Warwick
Time:
12.30pm
Abstract:
Knowledge utilisation has become a major focus of NHS policy that seeks to close the ‘translational gap’ between
 
research and practice. The rise of ‘evidence-based healthcare’ has focused particular attention on how healthcare managers can better exploit evidence. Commissioning is an area where wide variation is known to exist in decision-making and where exploitation of evidence is patchy. Yet, we know little about the ways evidence-based commissioning is actually accomplished in practice. Against this backdrop, our study investigated the utilisation of evidence in actual healthcare commissioning decisions. The aim was to improve understanding of evidence-based management, and to identify enablers of, barriers to the deployment of evidence for commissioning decisions. Key findings include:
  • Multiple sources of information were mobilised as evidence. Our results indicated that the most important source was ‘examples of best practice from other organisations’, followed by ‘local public health intelligence’. These were also sources that practitioners felt were lacking.
  • Effective mobilisation of evidence depended on the primary task, the timing/sequencing of decisions, and the types of experts involved.
  • Decision making always involved co-production of evidence. The key factors influencing this process were: (i) recognition of divergent interests and purposes (practical, scientific, political, moral); (ii) scope of co-production, i.e. the extent to which it changed existing service delivery arrangements/ partnerships.
  • Effective co-production of evidence depended on the ability to manage interdependencies arising from, role relationships, diverse expertise, governance arrangements, and diverse imperatives (cost, clinical, strategic, policy).
 
This seminar has been organised by the Institute of Health. Please contact Jas Bains at j.k.bains@warwick.ac.uk for more information or to book a place.
Speaker:
Maja Korica
 
(IKON, Warwick Business School)
Title:
SCRIPTS, STAGES AND INTERACTIONS: THE SITUATED PERFORMANCES OF GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC SPHERE
Date:
Wednesday 16 November 2011
Venue:
Room S0.18 (Social Sciences Building – Warwick University Main Campus) Map available here
Time:
2.00pm - 3.30pm
Abstract &
Biography:
Building on the practice-based approaches to the study of organizations, this paper reflects on a focussed
empirical part of a bigger study to examine how members of three distinct organizations in the public sphere
 

interactionally enact governance in situated practice. In particular, it engages the dramaturgical metaphor popularized by Goffman (1969), suggesting that daily accomplishments of governance as practice contain front and back stages, props, casts, scripts and directors, but also teamwork, disruptions and repair. Crucially, such performances, though featuring particular set casts and scripts, are essentially improvisational, with situational definitions of ‘good’ or ‘right’ continually (re)made in everyday negotiations. It does so by building on rare ethnographic stays in three ‘truth-defining’ organizations, namely a university, a think tank, and a quango (regulatory agency).

By looking into governance’s largely overlooked ‘backstages’ and reporting on the daily work that goes into presenting it as ordered and unproblematic, the paper contributes to demystifying an exclusive and thus elusive phenomenon, which has to a significant extent remained a ‘black box’ in most of the existing literature.

Maja Korica is currently a Research Fellow at the IKON Research Centre, Warwick Business School, working on the SDO-funded project entitled ‘The organisational practices of knowledge mobilisation at top manager level in the NHS’ with Prof. Davide Nicolini and Prof. John Powell.

Maja was recently awarded her PhD in Management Studies at the Saïd Business School, University of Oxford where she also served as a Senior Subject Tutor and Stipendiary Lecturer in Management at St. Catherine’s College. In addition, she worked with her Oxford colleague, Dr. Eamonn Molloy, on a qualitative project examining changing medical identities in the context of new technologies, which was published in the journal Human Relations in December 2010 and for which they were awarded the prestigious 2011 Diana Forsythe Award by the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) People and Organizational Issues Working Group.

Her academic interests are wide-ranging, but include practice-based approaches to study of organizations, the public sector and sphere, and interpretive research methods, particularly ethnography.

Flyer available to download (PDF Document)

 
 
Speaker:
Paul Carlile (School Of Management, Boston University)
Title:
Infrastructure for Innovation in Software and Science
Date:
Thursday 23 June 2011
Venue:
Room R03/04 (Ramphal Building, Warwick University main campus)
Time:
2.00pm - 4.00pm
Abstract & Biography:
Innovation requires sources of novelty, but the challenge is that not all sources lead to innovation, so its value needs to be determined. However, since ways of determining value stem from existing knowledge this often
  creates barriers to innovation.To understand how people address the challenge of novelty we develop a conceptual and an empirical framework to explain how this challenge is addressed in a software and scientific context. What is shown is that the process of innovation is a cycle where actors develop novel course of action and based on the consequences identified confirm what knowledge to transform to develop the next course of action. The performance of an infrastructure for innovation is constrained by the capacities of the artefacts and the ability of the actors to create and use artefacts to drive this cycle. By focusing on the challenge of novelty, a problem that cuts across all contexts of innovation, our goal is to develop a more generalized account of what drives the process of innovation.Paul R Carlile is an Associate Professor of Management and Information Systems at Boston University’s School of Management. A primary focus in Paul’s work has been understanding the challenges and solutions to moving knowledge across specialized domains. His work has been published in Administrative Science Quarterly, Harvard Business Review, Management Science, Organization Science and several other journals. Paul received his Ph.D. in Organization Studies at the University of Michigan; his MA in Organizational Behavior and B.A in Anthropology and Philosophy at Brigham Young University.
 

 

Speaker:
Sirkka Jarvenpaa (McCombs School of Business, The University of Texas at Austin)
Title:
Development of TMS in Globally Distributed Teams and Organizations
Date:
Wednesday 22nd June 2011
Venue:
B1.19, Warwick Business School, Scarman Road
Time:
11.00 – 12.30pm
Abstract & Biography:
The globalization of teams and organizations requires knowledge co‐ordination among dispersed
  organizational members. We know little about how cultural differences impact the coordination of
dispersed knowledge, so called transactive memory systems (TMS)‐or "who knows what" and
"who knows who knows what." In this presentation, we examine the sociocognitive processes of
TMS development at the team and at the organizational level in three different organizations that
heavily rely on information technology for their daily coordination.

Sirkka L Jarvenpaa is the James Bayless/Rauscher Pierce Refsnes Chair in Business Administration
at the McCombs School of Business, University of Texas at Austin where she is the director of the
center for Business, Technology, and Law. During 2008‐2012, she will hold a Finnish Distinguished
Professorship at Aalto University School of Science and Technology. She has held visiting
professorships in leading business schools in the US and Asia. She is the co‐editor in chief of the
Journal of Strategic Information Systems and has served as the editor‐in‐chief of the Journal of
Association for Information Systems also as the senior editor of Organization Science, Information
Systems Research, and MIS Quarterly. She is a recipient of two honorary doctoral degrees. Sirkka
is a frequent contributor in academic and industry forums on new industry architectures for
digitizing industries (information, entertainment, financial etc), inter‐organizational innovation,
and globally dispersed virtual collaboration.

 

This seminar is organised by the ISM Group in partnership with the IKON Research Centre

   
 
Speaker:
Peter Clark t(IKON Associate, Queen Mary University of London)
Title:
'Glocalization, Hybridization & Organizational Innovations: Zero Inventory as Permanance and Process'
Date:
Thursday 3 March 2011
Venue:
Room E2.02 (WBS Social Studies Boardroom, Warwick University main campus)
Time:
2.00pm - 4.00pm
Abstract & Biography: First, Fauconnier & Turner (2002) contend that research programs are typically locked into the publication of form type knowledge. They recommend counterfactual styles of thinking. Oswick (2010) commends concept blending. Second, in business schools the raft of process theories promoted in the past two decades are varied in their ontologies and epistemologies of temporality and knowledge places. Those claiming to connect macro/meso/micro dimensions such as Critical Realism and Revisionist Comparative Historical Sociology (Clemens 2007) do attend to inertia, the durability of institutions, organizing and networking. However, Grabher’s perspective locates networking amidst rather fluid ecologies and rickety ensembles of interweaving organizations. The notion of permanence might be analytically bracketed. Third, ‘Zero Inventory’ is a pillar in the productivist episteme which has evolved unevenly in occidental corporate capitalist-imperialism since the publication of Pacioli’s (1495) book on double entry book-keeping. Touraine (1955) sketched the evolutionary tendency of innovation in technology and organization towards systemic forms of ‘horizontally hierarchized authority’. His edited OECD booklet addressed the extent of reducing through-put times in the sixties (1965). In the productivist episteme MRP/II/ERP is a systemic pillar requiring new assembling disciplines in the ensemble. That ensemble informs the anticipatory practice of innovation-design (Clark 1972, 2000) as the removing of reverse salients. Fourth, Gordon Brown (2010: 1-6) claimed zero inventories exposed the frailty inherent in our advanced economies because any disruption by monetary crisis would leave London supermarkets four meals away from starvation. Peter Clark graduated in sociology from Leicester in 1960 when it was a hot backwater of quasi-evolutionary sociological anticipatory theorizing hosting conversations about embourgeoisement. The key theory texts included MacIver and Gurvitch. In Leicester it was a short step into Europe’s largest knitwear firm which was entrained to Marks & Spencer. The firms material and human morphologies of routine production (e.g. seasons) provided an early eureka moment. Then the unexpected (by me) innovatory burst in materials, technology, stitch geometries and products deepened the place-temporality insights. My personal knowledge in anticipatory times meant that I attempted to calibrate the multiple processes and informed the Director of Personnel that in a generation the firm would fail. It closed in 1988 (see Clark & Starkey, Ch.6; 1987). There were numerous signs. Those early reflections on work and organization informed my personal research program. Research funding came via DSIR (organizational rhythms), SSRC Program Grant (The Uses of the Social Sciences in Organizatin Designing), MOD (Organizing in the RAF), Netherlands Institute of Advanced Studies (Multiple times, repertoires and memory), Department of Employment (MPIO, Tannenbaum power control graph), Economic Council of Canada (replication of Aston Program in Textile Sector), ESRC WORC Program on ‘Longitudinal and comparative UK/USA investigation of innovation in technology and organization’; EPSRC (3) projects on CAPM (enter Jacky and Sue) then totem building in innovation-design (Dumas). Most recently was ESRC EBK with Rowlinson, Booth and Procter (Role of memory and corporate uses of history as knowledge in UK-USA). Each of these benefitted from very excellent research fellows. Recent books are Organisations in Action. Competition between Contexts (Routledge 2000); Organizational Innovation (Sage 2003). In process: America’s Unfolding Consumer Polity, Market Empire & Colonizing Corporations (for Liber).
 

 

 
Speaker:
Hari Tsoukas (Professor of Organization Studies, Warwick Business School)
Title:
'How Philosophy Matters to Management Studies'
Date:
Friday 18 February 2011
Venue:
Room R0.03/4 (ground floor of Ramphal Building, main University campus)
Time:
2.30pm - 4.00pm
Abstract & Biography:
Haridimos Tsoukas holds the Columbia Ship Management Chair in Strategic Management at the Department of Public and Business Administration, University of Cyprus, Cyprus and is a Professor of Organization Studies at
 
Warwick Business School, University of Warwick, UK. He obtained his PhD at the Manchester Business School (MBS), University of Manchester, and has worked at MBS, the University of Essex, the University of Strathclyde and at the ALBA Graduate Business School, Greece. He has published widely in several leading academic journals, including the Academy of Management Review, Strategic Management Journal, Organization Studies, Organization Science, Journal of Management Studies, and Human Relations. He was the Editor-in-Chief of Organization Studies (2003-2008). He is the co-founder and series co-editor of Perspectives on Process Organization Studies, Oxford University Press.
His research interests include: knowledge-based perspectives on organizations and management; organizational becoming; practical reason in management and policy studies; and epistemological issues in organizational research. He is the editor (with Christian Knudsen) of The Oxford Handbook of Organization Theory: Meta-theoretical Perspectives (Oxford University Press, 2003). He has also edited Organizations as Knowledge Systems, Palgrave Macmillan, 2004 (with N. Mylonopoulos) and Managing the Future: Foresight in the Knowledge Economy, Blackwell, 2004 (with J. Shepherd). His book Complex Knowledge: Studies in Organizational Epistemology was published by Oxford University Press in 2005. He is also the author of the book If Aristotle were a CEO (in Greek, Kastaniotis, 2004).
 
Speaker:
Erran Carmel (The American University Kogod School of Business, Washington, DC)
Title:
The Impact of Time Zone Differences in the Global IT Industry
Date:
Tuesday 7 December 2010
Venue:
Warwick Business School
Time:
2.00pm - 3.30pm
Abstract & Biography:
Do times zone differences help or hinder?
 
There is much confusion and mythology around this question. Carmel has studied global tech for 15 years and has specifically targeted the study of time zone issues. He will survey this multi‐year, multi‐method research effort. In 2010 he
conducted a country level study in Brazil (Does Time Zone Proximity Matter for Brazil? A Study of the Brazilian IT Industry, SSRN, 2010). He is currently completing a controlled laboratory experiment with simulated time zones (Do Gradations of Time Zone Separation Make a Difference in Performance?) His article on using time zone differences for speed, an approach labelled
“Follow the Sun” was just published. (Follow The Sun: Workflow In Global Software Development: Journal of Management Information Systems, 2010).
 
Professor Erran Carmel's area of expertise is globalization of technology. He studies global software teams, offshoring of information technology, and emergence of software industries around the world. His 1999 book "Global Software Teams" was the first on this topic and is considered a landmark in the field helping many organizations take their first steps into distributed
tech work. His second book "Offshoring Information Technology" came out in 2005, has been successful in outsourcing and offshoring classes, and is now in 5th printing. He has written over 80 articles, reports, and manuscripts. He consults and speaks to industry and professional groups.
 
He is a tenured full Professor at the Information Technology department, Kogod School of Business at American University, Washington DC, USA. In the 1990s he co‐founded and led the program in Management of Global Information Technology. In 2005‐2008 he was department Chair. In 2009 he was awarded the International Business Professorship. He has been a Visiting
Professor at Haifa University (Israel) and University College Dublin (Ireland). In 2008‐2009 he was the Orkand Endowed Chaired Professor at the University of Maryland University College. He received his Ph.D., in Management Information Systems from the University of Arizona; his MBA from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), and his B.A. from the University of
California at Berkeley.
 
 
 

This seminar is organised by the ISM Group in partnership with the IKON Research Centre

 

Speaker:

Natalia Levina (Stern School of Business, New York University)
Title:


 

When present meets past: Onshore immigrants managing offshored software development and
engineering projects

Date: Tuesday 23 November 2010
Venue: Warwick Business School
Time: 10.00am - 12noon
 

This seminar was organised by the ISM Group in partnership with the IKON Research Centre

 
Speaker:
Jessica Mesman
Title:
Follow-the-practice: An analysis of the dimensions of admission practices on a neonatal intensive care unit
Date:
Thursday 4 March 2010
Venue:
Room B0.08 (WBS Scarman Road Building, University of Warwick main campus)
Time:
2.00pm – 4.00pm
Abstract & Biography:
Jessica Mesman has a senior position at the Department of Technology and Society Studies at Maastricht Universityin the Netherlands. She has a background in Science and Technology Studies and the Sociology of Health and Illness
 

in particular. She has researched and published widely on issues concerning medical and ethical uncertainty in neonatal intensive care units. Her book Uncertainty in Medical Innovation: experienced pioneers in neonatal care won the ‘Sociology of Health and Illness Best Book of the Year 2009’ Award. Her current work has its focus on in situ intelligence and interaction with the aim to explicate the hidden competences and informal built-in structures that are crucial for the preservation of patient safety.

The project aims to question dominant ways of patient safety and provide alternative conceptualisations of patient safety. In her presentation Jessica Mesman will discuss the analysis of the ordering work involved in creating safe collaboration in complex care situations. Point of departure is the recognition of practices as modes of ordering and organizing our world. To reveal key organization practices that direct the reconfiguration of collaborative actions, the formation of an ad hoc team during an unexpected admission on a neonatal intensive care unit will act as object of study. Based on ethnographic research a fine-grained analysis of sources of coherency will provide insights into the preservation of patient safety during these moments of radical reconfiguration.

By using the concept of ‘practice’ as analytical device the paper opens up the dynamic web of individuals and the others, including the devices and machines, with which they interact, with the aim to identify the specificities of ordering work and conduct in situ during admission. Several issues are related to the accomplishment of a coherent ensemble of collaborative actions. Therefore the analysis of the orchestrated efforts of the team members requires a closer look at the mechanisms that make practices interact, stretch, shrink, clash and reconcile. It also involves the hierarchical order of practices and their specific nesting. Which practices, for instance, act as anchoring structures during which stage of the admission? Or what is the embedded normativity of the collaborative ensemble as articulated in its constitutional rules? These and other issues will be part of this study. This presentation is part of a larger research project that intends to engage with the real-life complexities frontline clinicians have to deal with, and is concerned with the identification of constituents of patient safety and how they are enacted in situ.

This seminar was organised by the IKON Research Centre and is jointly sponsored by the Institute of Health
 
Speaker:
Etienne Wenger 
Title:
‘Social learning theory and the future of learning’
Date:
Tuesday 15 September
Venue:
Lecture Theatre A0.01 (WBS Scarman Road Building, University of Warwick main campus)
Time:
2.00pm – 4.30pm
Abstract:
 
Biography:
This will be a discussion of how the foundations of social learning theory relate to emerging learning challenges
in the 21st century
Etienne Wenger is a global thought leader in the field of communities of practice and social learning systems.
 
He is the author and co-author of seminal books on communities of practice, including Situated Learning, where the term was coined, Communities of Practice: learning, meaning, and identity, where he lays out a theory of learning based on the concept, Cultivating Communities of Practice, addressed to practitioners in organizations who want to base their knowledge strategy on communities of practice, and Digital Habitats on technology for communities.
Etienne’s work is influencing both theory and practice in a variety of fields. It is also influencing a growing number of organizations in the private and public sectors. Indeed, cultivating communities of practice is increasingly recognized as the most effective way for organizations to address the knowledge challenges they face. Etienne helps organizations in all sectors apply these ideas through consulting, public speaking, teaching, and research.
 
This seminar was jointly presented and sponsored by the IKON Research Centre and the Warwick Organisation Theory Network (WOT Net)

 

Speaker:
Rick Iedema 
Title:
‘Discourse activism’? Redesigning and coproducing organisational meanings and feelings
Date:
Thursday 1 October 2009
Venue:
Seminar Room B0.09 (WBS Scarman Road Building, University of Warwick main campus)
Time:
Abstract:
2.00pm – 4.30pm
Discourse analysis commonly objectifies social and organisational phenomena as texts. Judged by how analysts handle

 

this material and how they promote their analytical conclusions, texts are taken to be adequately representative of the complex social and organisational spheres they are extracted from. Likewise, judged by some of the claims made about the social change capacity of discourse analysis, analysts’ practices are positioned as necessarily impactful and therefore naturally legitimate. However, there is little clarification of this impact of discursive analyses on social life generally, or on the people and practitioners themselves who were the original producers of the discourses selected for analysis. Impact may be derived through academic publication, occasional feedback of findings to research participants, consultancy work or even ‘consultative inquiry’ (Sarangi 2006). But specification of such impact generally only occurs for the benefit of formal-governmental research assessment or academic promotion, denying it relevance for reflecting on the efficacy and direction of discourse analytical practice itself. In this workshop seminar, I want to elaborate an approach towards discourse analysis whose impact is a criterial and defining rather than a peripheral and administrative matter. In the approach I want to present, ‘discourse’ is turned into a relational principle (Barad 2003), or an affective positioning (Thrift 2009), rather than a specific type of semiosis (or combination of semioses) offered up for dissection to procedural techniques and interpretive schemas. Part of this exercise involves considering ‘discourse’ as a means for drawing attention to both our own and research participants’ 'unchosen action patterns' (Cohen 2008; Dewey 1922), with the potential to render such habits open to inhibition and redesign. The workshop seminar will mobilise video clips portraying a range of ‘research moments’ drawn from recent patient safety projects conducted for the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care.
Biography: Rick Iedema is Research Professor in Organisational Communication, at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, and

 

Director of the Centre for Health Communication at the University of Technology Sydney. His research focuses on how clinicians communicate about their work with other clinicians, with patients and with their families. His 2006-7 work on Open Disclosure (clinicians disclosing incidents to patients and families) led to Australian Health Ministers' agreeing to nationalise Open Disclosure policy. His 2008 work on Clinical Handover is drawing international interest from hospitals and health research organisations in the Netherlands, USA and the UK. In seeking to problematise conventional social scientific approaches to analysis and knowledge production, his work draws on film-making of in situ communication processes, and involves practitioners and patients in making sense of the processes thus captured, and collaboratively imagining and realising new process possibilities. His most recent book publications include Discourses of Hospital Communication (Palgrave, edited, 2007), Identity Trouble (with Carmen Coulthard, Palgrave, edited, 2008) and Managing Processes in Health Services (with Ros Sorensen, Elsevier, edited, 2008). He publishes his articles in, among others, Social Science & Medicine, Sociology of Health & Illness and Organization Studies.
 
This seminar was jointly presented by the IKON Research Centre and the Institute of Health
 
Speakers:
Nikiforos Panourgias (WBS), Frans Feldberg (Vrije University Amsterdam),
Alex Schouten (Vrije University Amsterdam)
Title:
Interdisciplinary Innovation and Virtual Worlds seminar
Date:
Tuesday 20 January 2009
Venue:
Room B3.09, Warwick Business School, Scarman Road
Time:
11.10am - 3.30pm
 
Welcome and Introduction to the Interdisciplinary Innovation and Virtual Worlds Workshop: Julia Kotlarsky (Warwick Business School)
Interdisciplinary collaboration in innovative computer games development: Nikiforos Panourgias (Warwick Business School)
Virtual Worlds a Platform Perspective: Experiences So far: Frans Feldberg (Vrije University)
Virtual Worlds: Communication and Decision Support: Alex Schouten (Vrije University)
Biography:
Nikiforos Panourgias is Research Fellow at the Unit for the study of Innovation, Knowledge and Organisational Networks of Warwick Business School.
 

He is currently working on an ESRC-funded research project studying interdisciplinarity in the design and development of computer games. He completed PhD at London School of Economics. His thesis studied the design and development of an information and communication technology based platform for the cross-border settlement of securities transactions between the UK and Ireland, France, Belgium, and Holland and which receiving financial support from the EPSRC. His main research interests are in the areas of interdiciplinarity in the design and development of ICTs, and the role of ICTs in the reconfiguration of many areas of social life, from games and entertainment to markets and marketplaces, commerce, processes of economic and political integration, and finance.

Frans Feldberg is Assistant Professor E-business at the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, VU Univeristy Amsterdam. He holds a PhD in online decision behavior. His research is on the interface of business administration, cognitive psychology and information sciences. He specializes in decision making behavior and collaboration in computer mediated environments. His research projects focus on online decision making, decision support systems, computer mediated communication, and relationship building, collaboration and learning in virtual environments. He was the initiator and project manager of a multidisciplinary research team that was responsible for the VU University Second Life research initiative.

Alexander Schouten is Assistant Professor of Information Systems at the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, VU University Amsterdam. In his PhD research, which was funded by the Dutch Science Foundation NWO, he investigated adolescents' use of new communication technologies, such as social networking sites and instant messaging. Currently, his research focuses on the effects of new communication technologies and virtual environments on team performance, decision making, self-presentation and social interaction and, in general, the use of new communication technologies in the workplace.

 
Speaker:
Boris Kabanoff
  Leverhulme Visiting Professor, Sheffield University
Title:
Knowledge structures of prospectors, analyzers and defenders: content, structure, stability and performance
Date:
Wednesday 11 June 2008
Venue:
Room R1.03 (Ramphal Building, University of Warwick Main Campus)
Time:
2.30pm - 4.00pm
Abstract:

The managerial cognition perspective argues that managers operating in complex, dynamic environments develop knowledge structures that help them focus their attention, interpretation and actions. We explore the content and structure of top managers’ strategic knowledge structures by measuring differences in the level of attention they give in annual reports to strategic issues and themes that Miles and Snow (1978) used to describe their main strategic types. Twenty-one themes that form seven main factors describing managers’ strategic cognition are identified and these demonstrate reasonable fit with Miles and Snow’s (1978) model. We show that expert raters can recognize these factors when they read annual reports that contain them. Cluster analysis is then used to identify groups of firms that share similar profiles on these strategic dimensions which are interpreted as examples of cognitive strategic groups. These groups show alignment with Miles and Snow’s strategic types, are relatively stable over time and differ in financial performance. The sample comprises 1,038 listed, Australian firms between 1992-2003.

Keywords: knowledge structures, strategic cognition, generic strategies, strategic groups

Professor Boris Kabanoff is a Professor of Management in the School of Management, Faculty of Business, QUT and until June, 2008 is Leverhulme Visiting Professor at the Institute of Work Psychology, Sheffield University. Between 2003-2005 he was the Faculty’s Director of Research & Development and prior to this he was Head of the School of Management, QUT (1996-2003) a position he assumed after being at the Australian Graduate School of Management, UNSW for 14 years (1982-1996).
 
He holds an Honours Degree in Psychology (First Class Honours, University Medal) from the University of Queensland and a PhD in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from Flinders University. He is a Fellow of the Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management and in 2005 was awarded the Elton Mayo Prize by the Australian Psychological Society for his contribution to the field of organizational psychology. He has won Australian Research Council grants on nine occasions and has had editorial and editorial board responsibilities with a number of leading international and Australian journals, including Academy of Management Review, Journal of Organizational Behavior and Australian Journal of Management.
 
His main research interests are in the areas of organisational values, and managerial and organisational cognition with a focus on strategic cognition. He also has a major interest in the application of content analytic methodology, in particular computer aided text analysis to longstanding research questions in these areas. His most recent work has been accepted for publication in Strategic Management Journal and Organizational Research Methods. Major research projects at the moment involve a longitudinal analysis of the evidence for short-term thinking and its relation to strategic orientation among Australian corporates, and the influence of strategic cognition on firms’ innovation performance

 

 
Speaker:
Reijo Miettinen
Title: ‘Emergence and dynamics of innovation networks’
Date: Friday 14 March 2008
Venue: Room S0.09 (Social Studies Building, University of Warwick main campus)
Time:
2.30-4.00pm
Abstract: My research group has studied from the mid 1990s innovation related networks.
 
I will present some key findings of these studies. The presentation is composed of three parts. In the first part I will deal with the concept of network by introducing four idea-typical network concepts: 1) general, 2) social, 3) economic and 4) objectual. The meanings and limits of each of the concepts are briefly discussed. In the objectual concept network collaboration is studied in relations to an object that the partners are constructing together, as typically happens in product development. This approach allows the study of the emergence and development of the networks which complements the mainstream networks studies that focus on the structure of networks.
In the second part of the presentation, the development of product development networks of a Finnish biotechnology firm Finnzymes between 1986-2006 will be examined. Every major new product of Finnzymes was developed with a partner with complementary knowledge and resources. In most of the cases partly contingent encounter of the representatives of Finnzymes and of the partner, in which the complementary capabilities and interests were recognized, gave birth to a new idea and to a product development collaboration.
The third part of the paper the role of contracts in trust formation in product development collaboration is studied by focusing on one of the collaborative product development processes of Finnzymes, the development of Phusion polymerase enzyme in collaboration of an American biotechnology firm MJ Bioworks in 2000-2003. Instead of regarding contracts as a mechanism of collaboration alternative to trust, we analyze it as one of the means of trust construction among the others. In addition the functions of different contracts (secrecy-, collaborative-, licensing-) in different phases of product development process need to be analyzed. In addition to contracts the role of parallel testing and rules of transatlantic collaboration for the formation of trust is examined.
 
Reijo Miettinen is Professor of adult education at the University of Helsinki. He is Vice director of the Center for Activity Theory and Developmental Work Research, University of Helsinki. He has directed since 1995 a research group that studies innovation networks, producer-user interaction, free/open source development model (FOSS) in software development as well as other forms of internet-mediated distributed knowledge production. In addition he is interested in theories of learning and creativity and in comparing the philosophical and sociological theories of human practice and thought. Thus far he has worked to compare pragmatism, cultural-historical activity theory and actor network theory as approaches of studying human activity.
 
Speaker:
Rick Delbridge
Title:
‘Network diversity and discontinuous innovation in motorsport’
Date:
Wednesday 23 January 2008
Venue:
Room RO.12 (Ramphal Building, University of Warwick main campus)
Time:
2.30-4.00pm
Abstract:
Comparative qualitative research in the European motorsport industry demonstrates the key challenge of searching for new potential partners in radical new product development. The research shows that successful radical innovation involves wider exploratory activity, engagement with unusual or distant firms and the development of productive relationships which promote mutual exchange and cross-learning. There are thus the obstacles of finding, forming and performing in establishing such network relationships. The research highlights the importance of dedicated and proactive search activities, and reinforces the significance of investing time and resources in building commitment between network partners.
 
Rick Delbridge is Professor of Organizational Analysis, a Senior Fellow of the ESRC/EPSRC Advanced Institute of Management Research, and a Fellow of the Sunningdale Institute. His doctoral research involved participant observation in two factories - which was an education in itself - and was published by Oxford University Press as Life on the Line in Contemporary Manufacturing. Since then he has widened his research interests to include the management of innovation in motorsport and superyachts. He has worked with AIM colleagues to produce The Exceptional Manager, also published by OUP, and a series of reports on productivity, innovation and management practices (see www.aimresearch.org). His paper 'Systems of exchange' with Nicole Biggart was awarded the 2005 Academy of Management Review Best Paper Prize. His work has appeared in a wide variety of leading journals including California Management Review, Human Relations, Industrial Relations, Journal of Management Studies, Organization Studies and Sociology. He is Associate Editor of Organization and an editorial board member of several other major journals. As a Sunningdale Fellow, he has recently been working with senior civil servants to explore the relevance of 'business models' in the public sector.
 
Speaker:
Tim Morris & Michael Smets
Title:
Up-or-out promotion tournaments in elite law firms: A study of institutional continuity and change
Date:
Wednesday 28 November 2007
Venue:
B1.19 Seminar Room ( WBS Scarman Road Building )
Time:
2.30-4.00pm
Abstract:
In this study we examine how change dynamics at the field level and organizational level as well as different actors’ every day enactments of institutional practices and structures interact in shaping patterns of deinstitutionalization and change. We examine change in the context of a highly institutionalized practice in law firms: the up or out tournament promotion to partner model (Galanter & Palay, 1991; Gilson & Mnookin, 1989). We find that widespread adoption of alternatives to partnership at the field level are not a sufficient indicator of institutional change. Rather, the way new promotion practices are interpreted and enacted within firms is crucial to understanding the extent of change. Further, our study shows that institutional change may take the form of continuity and change rather than a complete replacement by a new institution especially when the cognitive underpinning of an institution under pressure is nested within another overarching institution. Despite strong pressures that appear to be eroding the up or out institution in law firms, we observe a parallel process of institutional continuity.
Tim Morris's research interests are concerned with the nature and patterns of change and processes of innovation in professional service firms. Over the past ten years he has studied firms in a range of sectors including law, architecture and management consulting. His research has been published widely in scholarly journals. His early work examined methods of human capital development, including promotion and rewards systems and their impact on performance. Subsequently he examined the extent and patterns of change in professional firms. Challenging arguments that suggest professional firms have changed radically in recent years, he used survey data to argue that important areas of continuity in organization and management persist. Morris' recent work focuses on the organisational challenges of innovation. Specifically, he and his research colleagues have looked at new practice formation as the vehicule by which innovations in professional services are developed and delivered. This stream of work relates to his continuing research interest in the transfer of knowledge within and across professional organizations and professions. He and his co-researchers have developed a conceptual model that outlines the process of new practice development as well as analysing the political processes involved in successful practice creation. Their current research focuses on the ways in which professional firms are organised to meet the challenges of serving private equity clients. Tim Morris regularly engages with practitioner audiences through consulting work, executive education and writing. His recent practitioner-oriented work has been concerned with leadership issues in professional firms, notably the challenges of strategic decision-making. He has presented his research to audiences of professionals on many occasions in the UK and abroad.
Michael Smets joined Saïd Business School in October 2002 to take the MSc in Management Research and went on to become a doctoral scholar at the Clifford Chance Centre for the Management of Professional Service Firms. Smets’ research focuses on the internationalisation of PSFs and its effects on local work-practices. In particular, Smets explores the impacts of work in cross-national project-teams on the routines of their geographically diversified members. He is interested to understand how professionals who come into contact with foreign work-practices that contradict their own taken-for-granted routines manage this incompatibility; and to examine the role of the larger normative structures that shape work practices.

 

Speaker:
Wendy Currie
Title:
Integrating Healthcare Through Information and Communications Technology: Policies, Practices and Pitfalls
Date:
Tuesday 11 December 2007
Venue:
Time:
2.30-4.00pm
Abstract:
Wendy Currie is Professor and Head of the Information Systems and Management Group at Warwick Business School. She has held professorial posts at the universities of Brunel and Sheffield. Her research interests are broadly in the field of managing large scale innovation and change programs in the private and public sectors. She has won research funding from the European Union, Economic and Social Research Council and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. She has written seven books and published her research in many scholarly journals. She is on the editorial boards of six leading academic journals. In 2005, she set up the MSc in Information Systems and Management at Warwick, and was academic director of this course for two years. She is currently on the council for the Association for Information Systems and is co-chair for the 2009 International Conference on Information Systems in Arizona, USA. Her current research is on innovation and change in healthcare, financial services and the police service.
This event is part of the IoH Knowledge, Innovation, and E-Health Group seminar series.

 

Speaker:
Georg von Krogh
Title:
Innovation beyond firm boundaries
Date:
Thursday 5 July 2007
Venue:
M2 Lecture Theatre (WBS Teaching Centre)
Time:
10.00am-12.00pm
Abstract:
Georg’s presentation will address the following areas:
  • Challenges in open innovation
  • Incentives to make open innovation happen
  • Efficiency in open innovation
  • Product quality in open innovation
  • Open source software
Georg von Krogh is Professor of Strategic Management and Innovation at the ETH Zurich's Department of Management, Technology, and Economics. He specializes in competitive strategy, technological innovation, and knowledge management. He has conducted research in various industries including financial services, media, computer software and hardware, life -sciences, and consumer goods. He teaches courses on Entrepreneurial Leadership, Strategic Management, and Innovation Theory and Research. Professor von Krogh received his MSc from the Norwegian University of Technology and Natural Science, and a Ph.D. from this University's Department of Industrial Economics and Technology Management. He has been Assistant Professor of Business Policy at SDA Bocconi, Bocconi University in Italy, Associate Professor of Strategy at the Norwegian School of Management, and Professor of Management at the University of St.Gallen in Switzerland, and a Director of this University's Institute of Management. He has been Visiting Professor at MIT's Sloan School of Management, Hitotsubashi University in Japan, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, and the London School of Economics and Political Science.
Professor von Krogh is a Fellow of the World Economic Forum where he is also involved in scenario development for industries and economies. He has consulted on strategy and educated executives for various companies, including ABB, Fujitsu, UBS, IBM and others. He has experience from being a board- or advisory board member of various companies and NGOs, including PricewaterhouseCoopers in Switzerland, Swiss Bank Corporation (UBS), and the SKAT Foundation. He also serves as a member of the Chapter Board at the Swiss-American Chamber of Commerce.
Professor von Krogh has published books on strategic management, knowledge creation, innovation, as well as organization and management theory. "Enabling Knowledge Creation" with Professors Nonaka and Ichijo, focused on how firms can build an organization culture and infrastructure that support product and process innovation. "Strategizing in Emerging Industries" with Professor Roos, investigated strategies employed by traditional media firms to manage the transition to innovative forms of electronic media. "Managing Corporate Acquisitions" with Professors Singh and Sinatra, presented research on factors that impact on the performance of merger-and acquisition strategies. Professor von Krogh has published articles in journals such as the Harvard Business Review, Management Science, Organization Science, Research Policy, and Strategic Management Journal. He is a Senior Editor of Organization Studies, and an Editorial Board member of various journals including the European Management Journal, MIT Sloan Management Review, and Long Range Planning. His awards include The Association of American Publishers' "Best Professional Business Book Award" and the Organization and Management Theory Division's "Best Symposium Award" at the Academy of Management.
 
Speaker:
Rosanna Breen
Title:
A quality assurance approach to evaluating work place learning in health care
Date:
Wednesday 30 May 2007
Venue:
R1.04 (Ramphal Building - University of Warwick main campus)
Time:
2.30-4.30pm
Abstract:
This presentation focuses on the development and application of a questionnaire that enables health care practitioners to evaluate whether a particular training, learning or organisational development initiative actually exposes its participants to an experience which is typical of an effective learning organisation.
A valid and important criticism of many work based learning interventions is that they do not always lead to organisational improvements. The legacies of the worst offenders are the “dust-collectors” i.e. materials and folders of notes left on the office shelf, never to be referred to again for the enhancement of the work of the organisation. Evaluations of these initiatives are also criticised for focusing on participant satisfaction with the facilitator and the facilities rather than on whether they actually expose participants to new ways of working for the purpose of organisational improvement.
Research in the field of organisational and work place learning is beginning to reveal the potential of different learning initiatives to enable productive working and continuous improvement. Building on previous work, this research employed a thematic review of the literature, focus groups and individual interviews with initiators and recipients of organisational learning initiatives to construct a new kind of evaluation questionnaire. Its purpose is to help organisations find out whether the initiative they invested in gave participants a high quality organisational learning experience.
Application of the questionnaire in 8 NHS organisations to evaluate 17 learning initiatives has led to refinement and validation of 4 independent learning constructs: Knowledge sharing, Leadership support, Application & execution and Goal alignment. High scores on these four constructs are indicative of an initiative which has succeeded in giving participants experiences that are typically experienced in effective learning organisations. The highest scoring initiative type is currently the Rapid Improvement Event.
Rosanna is a learning, research and evaluation specialist with a career history predominantly in Universities and Health Care. She currently works for the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement based at Warwick University as a Specialist Associate in the Learning Team. Three of her key values are to contribute fresh ideas, to conduct objective analyses and to help people to progress through institutional or organisational change.
 
Speaker:
Nick Marshall
Title:
Exploring cognition in practice: norms, rules, and routines in an engineering team
Date:
Wednesday 6 June 2007
Venue:
R1.04 (Ramphal Building - University of Warwick main campus)
Time:
2.30-4.30pm
Abstract:
Cognitive and practice-based approaches have provided two important influences on the literature on organisational knowledge and learning. However, they are typically portrayed as incommensurable, with the result that there has been little positive dialogue between the two traditions. In this seminar I will argue that the incompatibility of the two sets of approaches has been overstated and that there is actually much that each can learn from the other. Cognitive approaches, which have often been accused of offering an effectively individualised, static, and representationalist understanding of organisational knowledge, can benefit from taking on board the practice-based view of knowledge as historically, culturally, and socially situated. However, I will also suggest that practice-based theories would do well to draw insights from cognitive approaches, particularly regarding the role of cognitive frameworks or schemata in guiding knowledge processes. Without this, practice-based theories struggle to offer a fully developed account of how practices are constituted, reproduced, and potentially transformed through the interplay between routine and reflective action. To provide an example of how cognitive and practice-based approaches can be integrated, I will provide an empirical illustration of how a team of consulting engineers represent and perform alternative schemas of project work through their day-to-day practices. This provides the opportunity to reflect on both the theoretical and methodological challenges of pursuing a rapprochement between practice-based theory and cognitive approaches to organisational knowledge and learning.
 
Nick Marshall is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Research in Innovation Management, University of Brighton. His research primarily focuses on issues relating to organisational knowledge and learning in project-based settings. He is currently Principal Investigator on an ESRC project researching how differences in knowledge are constituted within multi-functional teams and their implications for project interactions. His previous research has explored such topics as the character of knowledge and communication in co-located and dispersed teams, practices and mechanisms of cross-project learning, and the cultural dimensions of inter-organisational relationships in the construction industry. He holds a PhD in industrial and economic geography from King’s College London and an MA in geography from the University of Oxford.
 
Speaker:
John R Bessant
Title:
Beyond the lamp-post: Search strategies for discontinuous innovation
Date:
Wednesday 2 May 2007
Venue:
R1.04 (Ramphal Building - University of Warwick main campus)
Time:
2.30-4.00pm
Abstract:
Recent research has drawn attention to problems with innovation management under conditions of discontinuity. For example at certain times the close interaction with players within the value network may act as a filter which blocks firms seeing the salience of new signals about emerging but very different potential technical or market trajectories. There is also the well-known issue of ”not invented here” suggesting that under conditions in which significant shifts occur in the technological trajectory existing incumbents often fail to capitalise or even to adopt. The problem is not simply one of missing important signals about emerging shifts in innovation trajectories in the environment. In a number of cases the information was available to the enterprise but its decision-making and resource allocation processes failed to deal adequately with the new information. These and other experiences suggest that whilst firms can learn capabilities around what might be termed “steady state” innovation conditions they need to extend these capabilities to deal with the uncertainties arising from discontinuous shifts in their technological, market or regulatory environments. This seminar will discuss some of the challenges around building such capability and present some case study-based illustrations of experiments around firm-level search routines.
 
Professor John Bessant, BSc., PhD. currently holds the Chair in Innovation and Technology Management at Tanaka Business School, Imperial College where he is also Research Director. He previously worked at Cranfield, Brighton and Sussex Universities. In 2003 he was awarded a Senior Fellowship with the Advanced Institute for Management Research and was also elected a Fellow of the British Academy of Management. Author of 15 books and many articles, he has acted as advisor to various national governments and to international bodies including the United Nations, The World Bank and the OECD.