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Trans and Gender Reassignment

Gender Reassignment (see terminology section below) is one of the protected characteristics under the Equality Act 2010. The Act aims to protect people from direct and indirect discrimination, harassment, and victimisation on the basis of gender reassignment. You can read more about the Equality Act here. On these pages you will find:

You can find more information and sources of support on the Trans Web Portal.

If you'd like to learn more about trans and gender reassignment and can't find what you need here, contact us and let us know.

 

Terminology at Warwick

Since the creation of the Equality Act terminology on ED&I issues has changed and progressed. At Warwick we use the term 'trans', as opposed to 'gender reassignment', when talking about equality issues relating to gender identity:

  • Trans is an umbrella term for anyone whose gender identity conflicts with the gender which they were assigned at birth.
  • Gender reassignment is the term used in the Equality Act 2010 to refer to anyone proposing to undergo, undergoing, or who has undergone a process (or part of a process) to reassign their gender by changing physiological or other attributes of gender.

Gender reassignment is the legal term, and as such when discussing the Equality Act we refer to this term. However, beyond this, we use the more inclusive term 'trans' in our work on gender identity equality.

You can find more information about LGBTUA+ Terminology on the Trans Web Portal.

 

Definitions

You can find more information about LGBTUA+ Terminology on the Trans Web Portal.

 

Gender Reassignment

In the Equality Act, the protected characteristic of gender reassignment refers to anyone proposing to undergo, undergoing, or who has undergone a process (or part of a process) to reassign their gender by changing physiological or other attributes of gender.

Under the Act, gender reassignment is a personal process, rather than a medical process. An individual would be protected by the Act

  • While they are proposing to undergo a process of gender reassignment, whether or not they ultimately go through with that process.
  • An individual is covered whilst they are in the process of reassigning their gender, even if they begin the process and later decide to stop.
  • If they undergoing medical gender confirmation treatments and if they do not - the Act does not require someone to undergo medical treatment in order to be protected.

 

Trans

A trans person is someone who self-defines as a gender other than that which they were assigned at birth. People have a gender assigned at birth according to attributes such as chromosomes, hormones and external and internal anatomy. However, this assignment sometimes conflicts with people’s gender identity - their internal sense of their own gender and what feels right for them. This might be male, female, non-binary (outside of male or female), genderless, or some other gender identity.

 

Transition

A person who is trans may decide to transition; that is to start living and expressing themselves in the gender with which they identify.

They may change their name, alter their appearance and dress, and use new pronouns (e.g. she/her, he/him, they/them). You can read more about pronouns on the Pronouns: Let's Get it Right webpage.

Transition is a long process which may include hormone treatment and/or surgery.

In the UK trans people can apply for a Gender Recognition Certificate (GRC) two years or more after transitioning. This allows the person to have a birth certificate in their new name and sex. You can find more information about applying for a GRC on the Gov.UK website.

 

Non-Binary Gender Identities

Gender identity refers to a person’s internal sense of their own gender and what feels right for them. This might be male, female, non-binary, genderless, or some other gender identity. All gender identities are equally valid.

A non-binary person is someone who defines their gender outside of the binary of ‘male’ and ‘female’ genders. There are many identities under the umbrella of ‘non-binary’, including agender/genderless (no gender), bigender (some combination of the binary genders of ‘male’ and ‘female’), genderfluid, and so on.

 

Gender Neutrality

Gender Neutral Facilities

The University recognises the many non-binary and gender-fluid identities that exist, and there are plans to increase the number of gender-neutral toilets available across the campus. You can find a full list of existing gender-neutral facilities on campus here.

 

Gender-neutral language

To ensure that gender-neutral language is used consistently throughout the University, both in official correspondence and internal documentation, all documents avoid gender-specific language wherever possible. This is in line with the University’s Trans and Gender Reassignment Policy (Section 17).

Read more about our approach to use of gender neutral language here .

 

Sources of Information and Support

You may also be interested in:

LGBTUA+ Staff Network

Policies - including the Trans and Gender Reassignment Policy

LGBTUA+ Initiatives - including Trans Awareness Guide, Trans Web Portal, and pronoun badges

Taskforces and SIC - including the LGBTUA+ Taskforce

Charter Marks - including the work the University is doing towards the Stonewall UK Workplace Equality Index (LGBTUA+ equality benchmarking exercise)

Events - including LGBTUA+ History Month and details of the Stonewall 50 celebrations in 2019