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Kristian Zahrtmann article and exhibition

Professor Michael Hatt has published an article titled ‘Zahrtmann’s Symposium: Ethics, History and Desire’ in conjunction with the new exhibition Kristian Zahrtmann: Queer, Art and Passion.


Dr Jenny Alexander: Notre-Dame Fire

Media outlets both in the UK and overseas have sought expert comment from our medieval art and architecture specialist Dr Jenny Alexander regarding the devastating fire at Notre-Dame Cathedral.

This is what she has to say:

The Conversation

TRT World Interview

Dr Jenny Alexander expert comment 


PhD studentship on the Responses to the Medieval in Art, Architecture and Heritage

Applications are invited for a full-time PhD (via MPhil route) studentship on the following topic: The Responses to the Medieval in art, architecture and heritage from the early- to mid-twentieth centuries in the interpretation of medieval heritage in Coventry, c. 1900-c.1960.

The PhD will be co-supervised by Dr Jenny Alexander (University of Warwick) and Professor Juliet Simpson (Coventry University). It is funded by the University of Warwick and Coventry University.

The studentship is tenable for up to 3 years full-time, subject to satisfactory progress, and will cover the cost of tuition fees at UK/EU rates (£4,260 in 2018/19) and an annual maintenance grant (£14,777 per annum at 2018/19 rates). The studentship will commence in July 2019.

The deadline for applications is 14th June, 2019.

FIND OUT MORE about this studentship.

Fri 12 Apr 2019, 15:55 | Tags: Funding, Postgraduate, General

New book from Dr Otto Saumarez Smith: 'Boom Cities'.

Cover of 'Boom Cities'.Congratulations to Dr Otto Saumarez Smith on the publication of his new book 'Boom Cities. Architect Planners and the Politics of Radical Urban Renewal in 1960s Britain'.

Boom Cities is the first published history of the profound transformations of British city centres in the 1960s. It has often been said that urban planners did more damage to Britain's cities than even the Luftwaffe had managed, and this study details the rise and fall of modernist urban planning, revealing its origins and the dissolution of the cross-party consensus, before the ideological smearing that has ever since characterized the high-rise towers, dizzying ring roads, and concrete precincts that were left behind.

The rebuilding of British city centres during the 1960s drastically affected the built form of urban Britain, including places ranging from traditional cathedral cities through to the decaying towns of the industrial revolution. Boom Cities uncovers both the planning philosophy, and the political, cultural, and legislative background that created the conditions for these processes to occur across the country.

Boom Cities reveals the role of architect-planners in these transformations. The book also provides an unconventional account of the end of modernist approaches to the built environment, showing it from the perspective of planning and policy elites, rather than through the emergence of public opposition to planning.

 
Fri 29 Mar 2019, 11:27 | Tags: Publications, General, Publication - Book

International conference at Kensington Palace co-organized by Professor Hatt.

Victoria’s Self-Fashioning: Curating Royal Image for Dynasty, Nation and Empire.

International Conference

Kensington Palace
20-21 May, 2019

Conference posterCo-organized by Historic Royal Palaces and the University of Warwick, in partnership with the Royal Collection Trust, the Bodleian Library, the University of Oxford and the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, London, to mark the bicentenary of Queen Victoria’s birth.

Queen Victoria's name is used to identify an era. Over her long reign the British Empire covered a quarter of the globe. The birth of photography, and an explosion in print culture and the press, allowed her image to touch its furthest reaches. Her image, painted and sculpted, still dominates public spaces scattered across continents. Narratives of Victoria's life have been rehearsed continuously since her death, testament to a legacy of enduring significance. However, these narratives have often presented her as a curiously inert figure, detached from public life and from the political shaping of the monarchy.

This conference seeks to challenge these orthodoxies by examining Victoria herself as a pro-active political agent in the construction of an image for nineteenth century monarchy, and therefore directly implicated in what would become the Queen Victoria phenomenon. The ambition is to explore Victoria's creation of her own image, and the examine ways in which she managed her conflicted role, as a Queen Regnant, but also a wife and mother, including through painting, photography, sculpture and dress. It will also explore the journeys of this self-curated image from Victoria's private sphere to the public realm, and particularly across the British Empire, examining the ways in which the image has been both in her own reign and in the contemporary world, to challenge imperial power and to counter critical responses to Queen and Empress.

The conference includes a showing of film relating to Queen Victoria’s history complied by Bryony Dixon, Curator of Silent Film, the British Film Institute, and a Queen Victoria focused magic lantern presentation by Dr Jeremy Brooker. There will be private views of two new exhibitions at Kensington Palace: Victoria: A Royal Childhood and Victoria: Woman and Crown before they open later that week.

Keynote Speaker: Professor John Plunkett, University of Exeter.

Conference fee: £120

POSTER

 

For tickets: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/victorias-self-fashioning-tickets-59155593974

A limited number of tickets have been reserved for students at £30, on a first come basis. Please apply for a student ticket directly from sara.ayres@hrp.org.uk.

Please direct any queries for information to Dr Sara Ayres (sara.ayres@hrp.org.uk).

 

Pre-University Taster Course at 'Warwick in London'.

Experience what it is like to study History of Art with seminars & visits led by staff from our Department: History of Art Taster Course.

This two-day course is designed for motivated and enthusiastic individuals who are looking to apply for University or have already applied, and is based at 'Warwick in London' in Pancras Square, less than two minutes’ walk from St Pancras International and King’s Cross stations.

  • TasterTime out in the capital exploring art and architecture
  • An opportunity to experience what it is like to study History of Art at University-level
  • 6 hours of teaching from Warwick staff covering topics on the art and architecture of London, historic and contemporary, usually taught to undergraduate students at university
  • Guest lecture from a top Warwick Faculty member
  • Readings and study materials provided for the course
  • A workshop on university applications
  • Lunches and refreshments
  • A certificate of attendance

Lectures

  • Professor Lorenzo Pericolo, Lecture in Renaissance Women in Art
  • Dr Sarah Walford, Lecture in Architecture and the City

Visits

  • Dr Rosie Dias, Dutch Art in the National Gallery
  • Dr Otto Saumarez-Smith, The Midland Grand Hotel, St Pancras Station and the British Library
FIND OUT MORE!
 
Tue 12 Mar 2019, 16:49 | Tags: Public Engagement, General

Setting the Scene: The Architectural Imagination of Renaissance Artists.

ImageA workshop organised by Dr Livia Lupi, History of Art Research Fellow, will take place at Warwick in London on 24th May 2019.

 

Setting the Scene: the Architectural Imagination of Renaissance Artists is a workshop exploring the representation of architecture in European painting between the fifteenth and the sixteenth centuries. Focussing on Italy and the Netherlands, its aim is to analyse the roles of architecture in narrative scenes through a series of case studies presented by established scholars, curators and early career researchers. Extended discussions after the papers will enable participants to probe in depth this emerging research topic, furthering our understanding of the architectural knowledge of artists, highlighting the inventiveness of their architectural solutions, and exploring the interplay between setting and narrative.

Programme

10.00-10.30 Registration with tea and coffee

10.30-10.40 Welcome

Session I
Invention, Antiquity and Ornament
Chair: Lorenzo Pericolo
 

10.40 – 11.05 Livia Lupi, “Travelling Architecture: Structural and Ornamental Innovation in Masolino’s and Vecchietta’s Work at Castiglione Olona”

11.10 – 11.35 Caroline Elam, “Inventing the Credible: Mantegna and Painted Architecture”

11.35 – 12.00 Caroline Campbell, “Architecture and Place-Setting in the Work of Giovanni and Gentile Bellini”

12.00 – 12.30 Discussion

12.30 – 14.00 Lunch Break (lunch offered to speakers and chairs)

Session II
Framing the Cityscape
Chair: Edward Wouk
 

14.05 – 14.30 Niko Munz, “Architectural Ventriloquism in Pre-Eyckian Panel Painting”

14.35 – 15.00 Katrien Lichtert, “ ‘All the World’s a Stage.’ Staging Practices in the Work of Pieter Bruegel the Elder”

15.05 – 15.30 Johannes Grave, “Nested Architectures. Painting, Urban Architecture and Furniture in the Berlin Ideal City Panel”

15.30 – 16.00 Discussion

16.00 – 16.20 Tea Break

16.20 – 17.00 Final Discussion and Concluding Remarks

Warwick in London
Stanley Building
7 Pancras Square
London

24th May 2019

Contact Dr Livia Lupi (Research Fellow, History of Art, University of Warwick) for more information.

POSTER & FLYER

 

Dr Otto Saumarez Smith has edited Oxford DNB February Update.

Dr Otto Saumarez Smith has been an advisory editor and key contributor for the February Update of the Oxford Dictionary of National Bibliography. This update has a particular focus on planners responsible for the redevelopment of Britain’s cities in the years after 1945. The subjects include three of Coventry’s town planners and designers: Sir Wilfred Burns, Percy Edwin Alan Johnson-Marshall, and Frederick Bernard Pooley.

Academic staff and students of the University of Warwick can read Otto's comprehensive Editor's Introduction to the Update (PDF) and view all the entries in the Oxford DNB (the library has a subscription to this online resource).

"These Oxford DNB entries are a contribution to the ongoing reassessment of these controversial figures. They attempt to understand, rather than merely castigate, the profession at the heart of the unparalleled physical transformation of urban Britain in these years. The cumulative effect won’t necessarily be to exonerate post-war planning, and they may not convince readers to re-evaluate the aesthetic and urbanistic qualities of divisive buildings covered in these entries, like Cumbernauld Town Centre, ‘Pooley’s Folly’ in Aylesbury, or Bradford city centre. Nevertheless, a more sympathetic approach is important, because it can help us to understand how the ideas of radical planners achieved such complete transformative ascendancy in the post-war period. The subject is hugely significant because of the profound effect it had, and continues to have, on everyday lives and places across the country".

 

Mon 04 Mar 2019, 12:38 | Tags: Impact, Publications, General, Online publication

Open Letter from staff of the History of Art Department.

The Department of History of Art wishes to express its profound concern at the recent events involving students who posted rape threats and hate speech online. While the department had no involvement with the incident, the disciplinary process, or the appeal, we are of course very troubled by this incident and by details that have emerged through the widespread reporting of it in the press and other media. Like our colleagues across the university, we feel particular disquiet at the decision to reduce the suspension of the students to one year.

First and foremost, we would like to reassure our students that we shall continue to do everything in our power to ensure their safety and well-being. As a department­­­–a department, moreover, with a student body made up almost entirely of women-we have created an environment of mutual respect and support, where we value difference and have zero tolerance for prejudice. This will not change. If any of our students feels threatened or unsafe, they should contact the Senior Tutor, their Personal Tutor, or the Head of Department, all of whom will be very happy to provide whatever help is needed.

We also join our colleagues in other academic departments in asking the university urgently to clarify the reasons for the decision that has been made, insofar as the constraints of confidentiality allow. Given the recently reported details of the investigation process and claims that the suspended students have been given greater protection than the victims, such clarification is now more pressing than ever.

The members of staff of the History of Art Department

Mon 04 Feb 2019, 12:19 | Tags: General

Call for Papers: 'Victoria's Self-Fashioning' international conference.

 

VICTORIA’S SELF-FASHIONING: CURATING ROYAL IMAGE FOR DYNASTY, NATION AND EMPIRE.

Kensington Palace, 20-21 May, 2019.

Co-organized by Historic Royal Palaces and the University of Warwick, in partnership with the Royal Collection Trust, the Bodleian Library, the University of Oxford and the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, London, to mark the bicentenary of Queen Victoria’s birth.

Call for Papers

Queen VictoriaQueen Victoria's name is used to identify an era. Over her long reign the British Empire covered a quarter of the globe. The birth of photography, and an explosion in print culture and the press, allowed her image to touch its furthest reaches. Her image, painted and sculpted, still dominates public spaces scattered throughout every continent. The narrative of Victoria's life has been rehearsed continuously since her death, testament to the enduring significance of her legacy. However, these narratives have not cst her as the focus of a culturally political study. Instead, orthodox approaches have set her up as a curiously inert figure, detached from public life and from the political shaping of the monarchy.

Queen VictoriaThis symposium seeks to challenge these orthodoxies by examining Victoria herself as a proactive political agent in the construction of an image for nineteenth century monarchy, and therefore directly implicated in what would become the Queen Victoria phenomenon. The ambition is to explore Victoria's creation of her own image, and examine the ways in which she managed her conflicted role, as a Queen Regnant, but also as a wife and mother, including through the mediums of painting, photography, sculpture and dress.

It seeks to map the journey of this self-curated image from Victoria's private sphere to the public realm, and particularly across the British Empire, exploring its dissemination through print culture and a burgeoning press, and its movement and use through many contexts, locally and globally. This will include the ways in which the image was used to counter critical responses to Queen and Empress in attempts to quench the flames of colonial resistance to British rule in ceremonial events or to challenge republican sentiment.

Papers that explore the following themes are invited:

• Queen Victoria’s self-fashioning

• Queen Victoria as a political agent

• Queen Victoria and her management of new media

• The journeys of Queen Victoria’s image: revision and new meanings

• Queen Victoria’s image as image of Empire

• Queen Victoria as a global figure: responsibilities and challenges for curators today

The conference will take place on the 20-21 May, 2019, at Kensington Palace. Please send proposals of 400 words maximum, for papers of twenty minutes, together with a short biography of 100 words maximum, to Dr Sara Ayres (sara.ayres@hrp.org.uk). The submission deadline is 28 February 2019.

IMAGES

"The Queen and Prince Albert at Home" (c.1844), National Portrait Gallery, London.
Franz Xaver Winterhalter, "Queen Victoria" (1859), Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018.
W & D Downey, Queen Victoria as Empress of India (1876), Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018.
 

Accessing ‘Island’ - Warwick students participate in discussion at Venice Biennale.

Students from the University of Warwick have been key participants in an open discussion/performance at the Venice Biennale British Pavilion. The event involved British Council steward research fellows, Warwick students, and pavilion visitors in a discussion about Island, the 2018 British entry. A web presentation has been produced by the organisers using quotes and photographs from the session: ‘Accessing ‘Island’: Experiencing the British Pavilion as (non)spectacle, as spectator, and as spectated'.

British Pavilion (Island), Venice Biennale, 28th November 2018.

 
Tue 11 Dec 2018, 09:41 | Tags: Public Engagement, Undergraduate, General

Metamorphosis of Frankenstein - Taster Day for school students.

Faculty of Arts Taster Day promotion page.On the 7th November, a Faculty of Arts Year 9 taster-day brought together 40 students from schools in Coventry and Birmingham, to explore some of the themes of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. The aim of the day was to introduce students to the breadth of perspectives offered by arts subjects and to hopefully inspire them to consider the arts in their future studies. With academics from English, History, History of Art (Dr Sarah Walford), Film and Television and Liberal Arts, students were invited to interrogate the text and historical sources, think about attitudes to the body, analyse visual imagery and consider the changing character of the Creature in film adaptations of the story. After a lively discussion about the ethical implications of current developments in artificial intelligence and bio-hacking, students were invited to consider what advice they would have offered Frankenstein prior to his experiments. The day ended with a Q&A session with departmental ambassadors and a campus tour.

Mon 10 Dec 2018, 11:15 | Tags: Public Engagement, General

Participation in Ribero International Study Day at Dulwich Picture Gallery.

Professor Lorenzo Pericolo and Dr Carlo Avilio are taking part in an international study day at the Dulwich Picture Gallery - Ribera’s Art of Violence: New Intersections and Interventions. The event relates to the exhibition Ribera: Art of Violence (26 September 2018 – 27 January 2019), and comprises academic and public sessions

"Examining Ribera’s art from various interdisciplinary perspectives, the event brings together established and emerging voices to explore new approaches to the artist, his works, myths and audiences, and is structured around the exhibition’s five thematic sections: Religious Violence; Skin and the Five Senses; Crime and Punishment; The Bound Figure; and Mythological Violence. Situating his paintings, prints and drawings within their historical context, this event will address the relevance of Ribera’s violent imagery in contemporary art and thought".

Full programme

10 December 2018, Dulwich Picture Gallery, London.

 

PhD studentship on the history & contribution of Coventry School of Art.

Applications are invited for a full-time PhD (via MPhil route) studentship on the following topic: College, City and Beyond: the History and Contribution of Coventry School of Art & Design from 1843 onwards.

The PhD will be co-supervised by Dr Rosie Dias (University of Warwick) and Professor Jill Journeaux (Coventry University). It is funded by the University of Warwick and Coventry University.

The studentship is tenable for up to 3 years full-time, subject to satisfactory progress, and will cover the cost of tuition fees at UK/EU rates (£4,260 in 2018/19) and an annual maintenance grant (£14,777 per annum at 2018/19 rates). The studentship will commence in May 2019.

The deadline for applications is 7th January, 2019.

FIND OUT MORE about this studentship.

 
Thu 06 Dec 2018, 12:25 | Tags: Funding, Postgraduate, General

Paul Smith - livestream of Cézanne event at Herbert Art Gallery.

You can watch Professor Paul Smith tomorrow in an event which will be streamed live from Coventry's Herbert Art Gallery. He will join Darryl Georgiou of Coventry University to discuss works in the current exhibition Cézanne: Montagne Sainte-Victoire which showcases the well-loved and significant painting by Cézanne lent by the Courtauld Gallery in London, and paintings from the Coventry collection by artists such as Paul Nash, David Bomberg, LS Lowry and Prunella Clough.

Coventry has strong historical links with the Courtauld family through the former Courtaulds company, a highly successful producer of man-made fibres which had a manufacturing base in Coventry.

 

Melanie Zefferino appointed to jury panel of Osten Biennial of Drawing.

Photograph of the jury.History of Art Teaching Fellow Dr Melanie Zefferino has been appointed a juror for the Osten Biennial of Drawing, an international event based in Skopje, Macedonia. An article including interviews with all the jurors has just been published on the website itsliquid. The other two members of the panel are Manos Stefanidis (former Curator of the National Gallery of Greece, commissioner for the Greek Pavilion at the 1990 Venice Biennale, and Professor of art history at Athens University), and Sonja Abadzieva (director of the Contemporary Art Museum of Skopje, 1965-2005, and founder of the The Large Glass contemporary art magazine).

The Osten Biennial of Drawing is an exhibition of drawings, prints, photos, and other techniques applied on paper open to artists from around the world. This year the Osten Biennial of Drawing is giving a special award in memoriam to Henry Moore.

 

Thu 08 Nov 2018, 13:36 | Tags: General

Film by Josefine Baark - ‘The Mystery of the Chinese Mechanism’.

Photograph of filming object.

Leverhulme Post Doctoral Fellow, Josefine Baark, has produced a documentary film, entitled ‘The Mystery of the Chinese Mechanism’ (Det Kinesiske Urværks Hemmeligheder) in collaboration with Christian Laursen Film.

The film presents research completed during her year-long Mads Øvlisen Art History Fellowship at the University of Copenhagen. The film explores how miniature automata combined aesthetically pleasing design with their consumers’ tacit knowledge of the unseen, mechanical interior. Such tactile and beautiful technologies play a major part in how people view and respond to the world, whether it be Chinese automata or an Apple iPhone 7. The models offer the opportunity to think about connectivity between aesthetics and technology, as well as between China and the West, in a manner that takes into account artefacts’ relation to their surroundings.

Photograph of Josefine Baark.The research was done in collaboration with a professional clock conservator, in order to document the technology that lay behind the intricately moving miniatures, and it features a unique insight into the otherwise hidden mechanism through an x-ray of one of the models at the National Museum of Denmark. The film also presents research conducted at Amalienborg Palace, Christiansborg Castle, Fredriksberg Castle, Drottningholm Palace and the Danish State Archives. Ultimately, it sheds new light on the dialectic by which inventions borrowed from one culture are adopted to suit another in the process of aesthetic hybridization.

The film’s completion was announced at the Novo Nordisk Fonden Art History Inspiration Day on 22 October 2018, where Josefine Baark was invited to speak about the project and its exciting results.

 
Sun 28 Oct 2018, 10:38 | Tags: Video and podcast, Impact, Research, General

First Frances Clarke Annual Lecture - "Exhibiting Tintoretto at 500".

Tintoretto at 500 exhibition logo.The first Frances Clarke Annual Lecture will take place at the Palazzo Pesaro-Papafava in Venice on 16th November.

Frederick Ilchman, co-curator of this year's anniversary exhibitions at the Palazzo Ducale in Venice and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, will talk about Tintoretto's artistic achievement and give an insider's view of the organization of the exhibitions.

Frederick Ilchman was part of the curatorial team for the Museo del Prado's Tintoretto exhibition in 2007 and lead curator for "Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese: Rivals in Renaissance Venice" at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and the Musée du Louvre in 2009. He also serves as Chairman of Save Venice Inc., the American counterpart to Venice in Peril.

The Frances Clarke Annual Lecture
"Exhibiting Tintoretto at 500"
Frederick Ilchman, Chair, Art of Europe at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Warwick in Venice & History of Art Department
Palazzo Pesaro-Papafava, Venice.

16th November at 6 p.m.

 
Thu 25 Oct 2018, 10:28 | Tags: General

Article by Delia Moldovan is published - Astrology & Agriculture.

Cover of Journal - detail of title.PhD research student Delia Moldovan has published an article entitled ‘Astrology and Agriculture in the Calendar of the Offiziolo of Charles VIII (Fondazione Giorgio Cini, inv. 2502/4)’, in the periodical Rivista di storia della miniatura (22 2018). The article is an interdisciplinary approach to the miniatures of the calendar opening the Officium parvum Beatae Mariae Virginis per annum, held in the Fondazione Giorgio Cini, Venice. The study sheds new light on the zodiac signs and the occupations of the months depicted in the calendar, particularly investigating two key features characterising the Milanese court of the late fifteenth century: the interest in astrology and the importance given to agriculture.

 

Mon 15 Oct 2018, 09:50 | Tags: Student Research, Postgraduate, General, Student publication

PhD student Fabio Franz article published in MDCCC 1800.

Mantegna paintingAn article written by History of Art research student Fabio Franz has been published in the Ca' Foscari University of Venice journal MDCCC 1800.

Disvelando pale, effigi e panneggi. Le ricognizioni danesi di Crowe e Cavalcaselle presents new research on a number of works housed in Danish collections, including celebrated portraits assigned to Titian and Parmigianino and altarpieces by Ortolano and Filippino Lippi. A comparison of the drapery and landscape painting in works by Mantegna, Leonardo, Giovanni Bellini and Jan van Eyck may to be of particular interest to those visiting Mantegna and Bellini, the exhibition currently on show at the National Gallery, London.


Image caption: Andrea Mantegna, Christ as the Suffering Redeemer. 1495-1500. Tempera on panel, 78 x 48 cm. Copenaghen, Statens Museum for Kunst, inv. KMSsp69. ©www.smk.dk Public Domain.

Fri 12 Oct 2018, 12:22 | Tags: Student Research, Postgraduate, General, Student publication

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