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New Habitability GRP

We are delighted to announce that Habitability has been selected as one of Warwick's Global Research Priorities (GRPs), which play a crucial role in interdisciplinary research at the University. The GRPs respond to complex multi-faceted global problems that can only be tackled through collaborative research excellence. They unite academics from different disciplines to address some of humanity’s most urgent questions, and create fertile ground for new ideas to flourish and interdisciplinary research to grow - enabling us to improve the lives of people around the world.

The four key themes of the GRP are outlined here. There are a number of funding opportunities for relevant research projects - see here for further detail.


Pondering panspermia - how life could travel through space

James Blake, a postgraduate student in the Warwick Astronomy & Astrophysics Group, gives an overview of his summer project researching the topic of panspermia and applying the theory to the exciting TRAPPIST-1 planetary system.


Panspermia's a Winner at Posters in Parliament

CEH member James Blake won the award for Best Poster at the 2018 Posters in Parliament competition, hosted by the University of Sheffield. Over 50 students were selected from institutions across the UK and tasked with presenting undergraduate research. James' research on lithopanspermia, the theory that life can hop from place to place throughout the Universe aboard asteroids and comets, managed to capture the judges' imagination.

Poster available here


University Research Centre

As of the 28th of June 2017, the Centre for Exoplanets and Habitability has been established as a University of Warwick Research Centre. Thank you to all members of the CEH who have contributed to our work so far, and who helped to make this a reality.


Enceladus' sub-surface ocean

Data from NASA's Cassini satellite has shown that Saturn's moon Enceladus harbours a sub-surface, salty ocean. After multiple flybys of Saturn's moon Enceladus, including one that passed through the plume of material being ejected from the moon, the various instruments on Cassini have given NASA enough information to confidently claim the existence of this ocean, and to speculate that there may even be hydothermal vents on the ocean's floor.

Wed 26 Apr 2017, 11:26 | Tags: news, Habitability, publication, Saturn, ocean, NASA, Cassini, Enceladus, Europa

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