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NSS 2021: PAIS top in every category among Russell Group peers

NSS logo with the text The Department of Politics and International Studies (PAIS) is thrilled to announce that, for the second year in a row, we are placed 1st for “overall student satisfaction” among Russell Group Politics Departments in the 2021 National Student Survey (NSS). This is a position that we are proud to have held for 4 out of the past 6 years.

In the NSS 2021, PAIS came top in every category among Russell Group Politics Departments:

  • 1st for Teaching
  • 1st for Learning Opportunities
  • 1st for Assessment and Feedback
  • 1st for Organisation and Management
  • 1st for Learning Resources
  • 1st for Learning Community
  • 1st for Student Voice
  • 1st for Academic Support

The 2021 results show that we are 1st in the Russell Group on 20 of the 27 NSS questions and in 2nd place on a further 5 questions.

For six years in a row, PAIS has ranked either 1st or 2nd on overall student satisfaction amongst the Russell Group. The 2021 outcomes reflect our best ever performance across all categories in our peer group; they demonstrate our close and effective partnership with the student body and our sustained commitment to the student experience.

Year

PAIS position in Russell Group for overall satisfaction

2021

1st

2020

1st

2019

2nd

2018

1st

2017

2nd

2016

1st

 

Across all programmes with which we are involved - both single and joint honours - we achieved 84% overall satisfaction. The Russell Group average for Politics was 72%.

These impressive outcomes are due to an outstanding team effort among our fantastic students, academics, and professional services colleagues, and demonstrate a partnership which we are extremely proud of. Thank you to everyone for all your hard work and support for our teaching and student experience during a very challenging year for all concerned. We are pleased that our approach to blended delivery during restrictions arising from the COVID-19 pandemic was appreciated by our students and we will continue to learn from student feedback to further enhance the student experience in 2021/22.

We look forward to continuing to work in partnership with our amazing students and dedicated staff to sustain and build on these strong results, which reflect our deep commitment to research-led teaching excellence. At the start of the new academic year, we will feed back in greater detail to all students and we will discuss and take forward ideas for further enhancement of the PAIS student experience via our Student Staff Liaison Committees (SSLCs).

In particular, we will intensify our work on liberating and decolonising the curriculum, employability and building a sense of community and belonging. We will support and promote student wellbeing and work with partner Departments to ensure continued excellence across all programmes, in particular joint degrees.

*See the Office for Students website for more details and the full data. The results are based on the official Common Aggregation Hierarchy (CAH) subject breakdowns and the 20 Russell Group institutions which met the publications threshold for Politics.


Stuart Elden's book The Early Foucault published

Stuart Elden's book The Early Foucault has been published by Polity Press.

The Early Foucault by Stuart Elden, front coverIt was not until 1961 that Foucault published his first major book, History of Madness. He had already been working as an academic for a decade, teaching in Lille and Paris, writing, organizing cultural programmes and lecturing in Uppsala, Warsaw and Hamburg. Although he published little in this period, Foucault wrote much more, some of which has been preserved and only recently become available to researchers. Drawing on archives in France, Germany, Switzerland, Sweden and the USA, this is the most detailed study yet of Foucault’s early career. It recounts his debt to teachers including Louis Althusser, Jean Hyppolite, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Jean Wahl; his diploma thesis on Hegel; and his early teaching career. It explores his initial encounters with Georges Canguilhem, Jacques Lacan, and Georges Dumézil, and analyses his sustained reading of Friedrich Nietzsche, Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger. Also included are detailed discussions of his translations of Ludwig Binswanger, Victor von Weizsäcker, and Immanuel Kant; his clinical work with Georges and Jacqueline Verdeaux; and his cultural work outside of France.Investigating how Foucault came to write History of Madness, Stuart Elden shows this great thinker’s deep engagement with phenomenology, anthropology and psychology. An outstanding, meticulous work of intellectual history, The Early Foucault sheds new light on the formation of a major twentieth-century figure.

This is the third of a series of books tracing the intellectual history of Foucault's entire career. Foucault's Last Decade was published in 2016 and Foucault: The Birth of Power in 2017. Stuart is currently researching the final book in the series on Foucault's work in the 1960s which he hopes to complete in 2022.

There is a post about the research and writing of the book on the Polity blog and a lot more detail on Stuart's website.


Ethics in Climate Adaptation and Resilience AHRC Award for Keith Hyams

Keith Hyams and Morten Byskov have been awarded AHRC GCRF funding for their project ‘Inserting Ethics into Climate Adaptation and Resilience Policy’. The project will work with collaborators at the University of Cape Town and with Cape Town city’s climate adaptation department to look at how issues of ethics and justice can be incorporated into responses to climate-related risks. Cape Town has already come perilously close to a city-wide drought and regularly suffers from flooding: the project seeks to ensure that the most vulnerable communities such as informal settlements are incorporated in an ethical manner into city-level protection plans. In addition, Morten Byskov has been awarded a competitive Fellowship at Warwick’s Institute for Global Sustainable Development, which aims to bring researchers together from across Warwick to strengthen cross-departmental collaboration and research in the area of sustainability.


Stuart Elden receives British Academy/Leverhulme grant for archival work on the early Foucault

Foucalt With HairStuart Elden has been awarded a British Academy/Leverhulme small grant for a project entitled ‘The Early Foucault: Retracing Intellectual History through Archival Sources’. This work builds on his recent books on Foucault’s later career – Foucault’s Last Decade (Polity, 2016) and Foucault: The Birth of Power (Polity, 2017) – in a study of his intellectual formation. The research will involve working with archives of Foucault’s papers in Paris and Normandy, his personal library held at Yale, and papers and libraries of research collaborators in Tübingen, Princeton and Irvine. It will also involve a visit to the Carolina Rediviva library in Uppsala, where Foucault researched his History of Madness. The research will lead to a book entitled The Early Foucault (under contract with Polity), and the initial work for a book on Foucault’s career in the 1960s.

More detail on the project on the early Foucault can be found on Stuart’s blog.

Mon 11 Mar 2019, 12:02 | Tags: Staff, Political Theory, Research

Stuart Elden's Shakespearean Territories Book Published

Shakespearean.TerritoriesStuart Elden’s book Shakespearean Territories was published in late 2018 by University of Chicago Press. The book uses readings of a number of Shakespeare’s plays to explore different aspects of territory.

Shakespeare’s plays explore many territorial themes: from the division of the kingdom in King Lear, to the relations among Denmark, Norway, and Poland in Hamlet, to questions of disputed land and the politics of banishment in Richard II. Shakespeare dramatized a world of technological advances in measuring, navigation, cartography, and surveying, and his plays open up important ways of thinking about strategy, economy, the law, and colonialism, providing critical insight into a significant juncture in history.

The book explores how Shakespeare can be read as developing a nuanced understanding of the complicated concept and practice of territory and, more broadly, the political-geographical relations between people, power, and place.

More details about the book can be found at the publisher website: https://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/S/bo28246205.html


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