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PAIS: Rises to 2nd in Times / Sunday Times Good University Guide

We are delighted to announce that the Department of Politics and International Studies (PAIS) at the University of Warwick has moved up to joint 2nd place out of 79 UK Politics Departments in The Times/The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2023. This prestigious league table continues to place us 1st in the Russell Group for both ‘teaching quality’ and ‘student experience’.

Professor Matthew Clayton, Head of PAIS, commented: “It is always really pleasing when the collaborative efforts of staff and students to sustain an inclusive and productive learning environment are recognised in national league tables. PAIS is a special department in which every member of the community is supported to find their own voice by engaging with the best scholarship in our discipline. I congratulate colleagues and students alike for their work and look forward to our building on this consistent success in the future.”

Dr Justin Greaves, Director of Student Experience and Progression, commented: “This is brilliant news for the PAIS Department and all our students, alumni, and staff. It follows our great success in the 2022 National Student Survey (NSS) where we were once again 1st out of all Politics departments in the Russell Group in all categories, including 1st for overall student satisfaction. These consistent results are a testament to the hard work and brilliance of everyone who works and studies in PAIS, along with our ethos as viewing students as partners, producers, and collaborators, and valuing and acting on student feedback. We will continue to place a strong emphasis on academic support, including on study choices, and employability and skills. I look forward to working with our incoming and returning students to ensure that the PAIS Department continues to go from strength to strength. Congratulations everyone!”

Thank you to all our students and staff for PAIS' continued success.

Tue 27 Sep 2022, 09:34 | Tags: Front Staff PhD MA UG Faculty of Social Sciences

The Politics of Chinese Nuclear Commemoration

Date: Monday, 6th February

Time: 12:15-13:30

Place: R1.03, Ramphal Building

In the study of China’s foreign affairs, historians like to suggest that the past is always present. A ‘Century of Humiliation’ in the nineteenth century or fighting the Japanese in the 1930s and 1940s are often referenced. Yet another historic development, namely China’s development of nuclear weapons in the 1950s and 1960s, is often absent from this assessment. In contrast to many other nuclear weapons states, China has largely been quiet about its nuclear past. Only in the last years of former leader Hu Jintao (2003-2012) and now the current leader, Xi Jinping (2013-) has China started to commemorate its nuclear weapons development more seriously. This paper sets out to understand both the nature and timing of this commemoration within China but also the wider implications of nuclear commemoration for regional and international security. Ultimately, under Xi Jinping, China’s nuclear past is finally becoming present.

Dr Nicola Leveringhaus is Senior Lecturer in East Asian Security and International Relations at the Department of War Studies, King’s College London. Dr Leveringhaus specialises in nuclear weapons issues in Northeast Asia, especially related to China. She has lectured at Sheffield University (2015-16) and was a British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow (2012-15) at the University of Oxford. She has been a Senior Visiting Scholar at Tsinghua University; and a Pre-Doctoral Fellow at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies. She holds an MPhil in Modern Chinese Studies and DPhil in International Relations from St. Antony's College, Oxford. Her second book China and Global Nuclear Order, from Estrangement to Active Engagement was nominated for the 2017 ECPR Hedley Bull Prize.


Book Launch: Everyday Border Struggles: Segregation and Solidarity in the UK and Calais

Border Struggles Flyer: ONLINE EVENT – 8th February 2023, 17:00-18:30  Presented by BREM – Borders, Race, Ethnicity and Migration Network   Join the meeting using this link on the day of the discussion: https://bit.ly/3WzTbFR   Thom Tyerman will discuss his book Everyday Border Struggles: Segregation and Solidarity in the UK and Calais with Ana Aliverti (University of Warwick) and Joe Turner (University of York)   In an age of mobility, borders appear to be everywhere. Encountered more and more in our everyday lives, borders locally enact global divisions and inequalities of power, wealth, and identity. From the Calais ‘jungle’ to the UK’s ‘hostile environment’ policy, this book examines how borders in the UK and Calais operate through everyday practices of segregation. At the same time, it reveals how border segregation is challenged and resisted by everyday practices of ‘migrant solidarity’ among people on the move and no borders activists. In doing so, it explores how everyday borders are key sites of struggles over and against postcolonial and racialised global inequalities. This talk will be of interest to scholars and students working on migration, borders, and citizenship as well as practitioners and organisers in migrant rights, asylum advocacy, and anti-detention or deportation campaigns.

ONLINE EVENT – 8th February 2023, 17:00-18:30

Presented by BREM – Borders, Race, Ethnicity and Migration Network

Join the meeting using this link on the day of the discussion: https://bit.ly/3WzTbFR

Thom Tyerman will discuss his book Everyday Border Struggles: Segregation and Solidarity in the UK and Calais with Ana Aliverti (University of Warwick) and Joe Turner (University of York)

In an age of mobility, borders appear to be everywhere. Encountered more and more in our everyday lives, borders locally enact global divisions and inequalities of power, wealth, and identity. From the Calais ‘jungle’ to the UK’s ‘hostile environment’ policy, this book examines how borders in the UK and Calais operate through everyday practices of segregation. At the same time, it reveals how border segregation is challenged and resisted by everyday practices of ‘migrant solidarity’ among people on the move and no borders activists. In doing so, it explores how everyday borders are key sites of struggles over and against postcolonial and racialised global inequalities. This talk will be of interest to scholars and students working on migration, borders, and citizenship as well as practitioners and organisers in migrant rights, asylum advocacy, and anti-detention or deportation campaigns.


The Humanitarian-Development-Peace Nexus – A Talk by Rebecca Roberts, PAIS Honorary Research Fellow

The Humanitarian-Development-Peace (HDP) nexus, also referred to as the triple nexus, is the latest approach to improving the outcomes of humanitarian interventions through coordination and integration of cross-sectoral programming. This talk will consider the dilemmas and challenges for large-scale international operations adopting a triple nexus approach. The presentation will draw on personal experiences of large-scale international interventions in Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan and Sudan.

Dr Roberts will also be willing to answer questions on her career trajectory from PhD to international development consultant.

When? Tuesday 24 January 2023, 5-6.30pm
Where? Oculus, OC0.05

This is an in-person event and all are welcome.

About the speaker: Rebecca Roberts is an Honorary Research Fellow in PAIS. She holds a PhD in Post-war Recovery and International Development and has over 20 years of experience conducting research in conflict-affected countries to inform the policy and practice of national and international responses. She specializes in stabilisation, governance and forced migration and has extensive experience in Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia including in Sudan and South Sudan, Lebanon and Afghanistan. She has worked with governments, donors, UN agencies, local and national non-governmental organizations as well as affected populations.

Mon 16 Jan 2023, 14:06 | Tags: Staff, PhD, MA, UG, Research Events, International Relations and Security

Vaccine Hesitancy & Disinformation Podcast Launch

As part of the AHRC-DFG funded project: Moral Obligation and Epistemology: The Case of Vaccine Hesitancy, we have launched a podcast series.

We will be interviewing academics in health psychology, philosophy, politics and public health, as well as professionals working in public health, government, and social media. Topics explored in the podcast include: the rationality of hesitancy, conspiracy theories, misinformation, and hesitancy among vulnerable communities.

The podcasts will appeal to academics interested in the causes of vaccine hesitancy, and in the tools and methods we can use to increase vaccine uptake.


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