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Ethics in Climate Adaptation and Resilience AHRC Award for Keith Hyams

Keith Hyams and Morten Byskov have been awarded AHRC GCRF funding for their project ‘Inserting Ethics into Climate Adaptation and Resilience Policy’. The project will work with collaborators at the University of Cape Town and with Cape Town city’s climate adaptation department to look at how issues of ethics and justice can be incorporated into responses to climate-related risks. Cape Town has already come perilously close to a city-wide drought and regularly suffers from flooding: the project seeks to ensure that the most vulnerable communities such as informal settlements are incorporated in an ethical manner into city-level protection plans. In addition, Morten Byskov has been awarded a competitive Fellowship at Warwick’s Institute for Global Sustainable Development, which aims to bring researchers together from across Warwick to strengthen cross-departmental collaboration and research in the area of sustainability.


Stuart Elden receives British Academy/Leverhulme grant for archival work on the early Foucault

Foucalt With HairStuart Elden has been awarded a British Academy/Leverhulme small grant for a project entitled ‘The Early Foucault: Retracing Intellectual History through Archival Sources’. This work builds on his recent books on Foucault’s later career – Foucault’s Last Decade (Polity, 2016) and Foucault: The Birth of Power (Polity, 2017) – in a study of his intellectual formation. The research will involve working with archives of Foucault’s papers in Paris and Normandy, his personal library held at Yale, and papers and libraries of research collaborators in Tübingen, Princeton and Irvine. It will also involve a visit to the Carolina Rediviva library in Uppsala, where Foucault researched his History of Madness. The research will lead to a book entitled The Early Foucault (under contract with Polity), and the initial work for a book on Foucault’s career in the 1960s.

More detail on the project on the early Foucault can be found on Stuart’s blog.

Mon 11 Mar 2019, 12:02 | Tags: Staff, Political Theory, Research

Stuart Elden's Shakespearean Territories Book Published

Shakespearean.TerritoriesStuart Elden’s book Shakespearean Territories was published in late 2018 by University of Chicago Press. The book uses readings of a number of Shakespeare’s plays to explore different aspects of territory.

Shakespeare’s plays explore many territorial themes: from the division of the kingdom in King Lear, to the relations among Denmark, Norway, and Poland in Hamlet, to questions of disputed land and the politics of banishment in Richard II. Shakespeare dramatized a world of technological advances in measuring, navigation, cartography, and surveying, and his plays open up important ways of thinking about strategy, economy, the law, and colonialism, providing critical insight into a significant juncture in history.

The book explores how Shakespeare can be read as developing a nuanced understanding of the complicated concept and practice of territory and, more broadly, the political-geographical relations between people, power, and place.

More details about the book can be found at the publisher website: https://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/S/bo28246205.html


Grant Success – Challenging Inequalities

Keith Hyams has been awarded funding from the ESRC Global Challenges Research Fund for the 2 year research project ‘Challenging Inequalities: An Indo-European Perspective’.

The project is a collaboration with the Economics Department at Warwick, the Centre de Sciences Humaines in Delhi, and others. It aims to look at appropriate definitions and approaches to the measurement of inequality, attitudes to inequality, and interventions to reduce inequality in a development context.


Keith Hyams awarded BA research funding on Indigenous Climate Adaptation

Keith Hyams has been awarded a British Academy International Challenges Research Project Grant for his project ‘Remedying Injustice in Indigenous Climate Adaptation Planning’. The project investigates ethical aspects of the relationship between indigenous communities, climate change, and adaptation policies. It asks how adaptation policies that integrate indigenous knowledge on climate adaptation can work to reduce the inequitable distribution of climate impacts on indigenous populations. The project will be undertaken in collaboration with the University of Makerere in Kampala, and Batwa Indigenous Communities in the South West of Uganda.


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