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Thu, Sep 27, '18
17:00 - 18:00
BA Visiting Fellow Cristian Mondello Public Lecture: Tokens and Religious Diversity in Late Antiquity
The Oculus - OC 0.01

This talk discusses tokens of Late Antiquity, with a particular focus on the mysterious so-called Asina tokens. The study of these tesserae carrying the image of a she-donkey (Asina) suckling a foal is dependent at present on A. Alföldi (1951) and his controversial interpretation of these artefacts as tools of a covert “pagan” propaganda against the Christian Empire during the reign of Honorius (AD 395-423). This paper will focus on a preliminary classification of these objects, as well as a typological, morphological and iconographical analysis. I will analyse the Asina tokens with the goal of understanding the historical and cultural meaning they had at a crucial moment in the relations between pagans and Christians in Late Antiquity.

Wed, Oct 3, '18
15:30 - 16:30
Work in Progress Seminar
Oculus 1.02

David Swan (University of Warwick) "The Importance of the Stater in Iron Age Coin Hoarding"

Dr Elena Giusti (University of Warwick) "Horace's Ode 1.12: Subterranean Lyrics"

Wed, Oct 10, '18
16:00 - 17:00
WiP Guest Speaker: Prof. Francesca Romana Berno (Sapienza, Rome) "Apocalypses and the Sage. Different Endings of the World in Seneca"
Oculus 1.02

Prof. Francesca Romana Berno (Sapienza University of Rome)

"Apocalypses and the Sage. Different Endings of the World in Seneca"

Prof. Francesca Romana Berno is Associate Professor at the University of Rome La Sapienza. Her research focusses on Latin prose, particularly on Seneca and Cicero.

Wed, Oct 17, '18
15:30 - 16:30
Work in Progress Seminar
Oculus 1.02

Nick Brown (University of Warwick) "Thoth's Gift to the Greeks"

Kathryn Thompson (University of Warwick) "The Phallus in Urban Space at Pompeii"

Wed, Oct 24, '18
16:00 - 17:00
Work in Progress Seminar
Oculus 1.02

Paloma Perez Galvan (University of Warwick)

"Organisation of the Material in Sixteenth-Century Epigraphic Collections: Creating Categories and Devising Indices

Martina Russo (University of Warwick) "The Philosopher and the Emperor. A fictive dialogue between Epictetus and Domitian."

Thu, Oct 25, '18
17:00 - 18:00
Classical Connections Public Lecture: Dr Sarah Derbew (Harvard) "Astute Performers: the Danaids in Aeschylus' Suppliant Women"
OC 1.06

Dr Sarah Derbew (Harvard University/Stanford University)

"Astute Performers: the Danaids in Aeschylus' Suppliant Women"

Dr Sarah Derbew is Fellow of the Harvard Society of Fellows and Assistant Professor of Classics at Stanford University (starting in 2020). Her research focuses on critical and self-reflexive theorizations of race and cultural identity in ancient Greek literature and art from the fifth century BCE to the third century CE.

In this lecture, she will provide an interdisciplinary reading of Aeschylus' Suppliant Women in conversation with Paul Laurence Dunbar and Ralph Ellison, touching upon the use of Critical Race Theory in dealing with ancient Greek literature and its reception.

The Lecture is generously funded by the HRC and IATL as part of the Classical Connections Seminar Series and as Public Lecture for the undergraduate module 'Africa and the Making of Classical Literature'

Wed, Oct 31, '18
15:30 - 16:30
Work in Progress Seminar
Oculus 1.02

James Currie (University of Warwick) "The Transformation of the Sacred Landscape of Neapolis (Syracuse) during the Augustan Colonization of 21BC"

Dr Hannah Mitchell (University of Warwick) "Lucius Cornificius' Elephant and the Politics of Commemoration in Triumviral Rome"

Wed, Nov 14, '18
16:00 - 17:00
WiP Guest Speaker: Dr Oliver Schelske (LMU München) "Herodotus' Histories - a manual of making political decisions?"
Oculus 1.02

Dr Oliver Schelske (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München) "Herodotus' Histories - a manual of making political decisions?"

Dr Schelske specialises in epic poetry, notably the Argonautica of Orpheus, ancient historiography and reception studies.

http://www.klassphil.uni-muenchen.de/personen/wiss_ma/schelske/index.html

Organiser: LMU Munich

The event is sponsored by LMUexcellent (DFG Excellence Initiative).

Wed, Nov 21, '18
15:30 - 16:30
Work in Progress Seminar
Oculus 1.02

Denise Wilding (University of Warwick) 'Tokens in Roman Gaul'

Annie Sharples (University of Warwick) "The Hunt for Hephaestus' Visual Impairment at the Birth of Athena"

Wed, Nov 28, '18
16:00 - 17:00
WiP Guest Speaker: Prof. William Fitzgerald (KCL) "Falling in Love- Again?"
Oculus 1.02

Prof. William Fitzgerald (King's College London) "Falling in Love- Again?"

Professor Fitzgerald is a specialist in Latin poetry, working on Lyric and Repetition and Martial.

https://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/people/academic/fitzgerald/index.aspx

Wed, Dec 5, '18
15:30 - 16:30
Work in Progress Seminar
Oculus 1.02

Effimia Stavropoulou (University of Warwick) "Defining the 'divine' in Aeschylean tragedy"

Prof. Michael Scott (University of Warwick) "Now you see it, now you don’t' Walls and the ancient Greek religious experience"

Wed, Jan 9, '19
15:30 - 16:30
Work in Progress Seminar

Vicky Jewell (University of Warwick) "Contrast: colours of opposition in Ancient Greek society"

Fri, Jan 11, '19
17:00 - 18:00
Classical Connections Seminar Lecture: Dr Thomas Phillips (Manchester) "Shelley's Plastic Hellenism"

Dr Thomas Phillips is lecturer in Classical Literature at the University of Manchester. He is the author of Pindar's Library: Performance Poetry and Material Texts (Oxford, 2016) and of numerous contributions on Greek classical and hellenistic literature.

Wed, Jan 16, '19
15:30 - 16:30
Work in Progress Seminar
Oculus

Prof. Alison Cooley (University of Warwick) "Reflections on the SCP"

Wed, Jan 23, '19
16:00 - 17:00
WiP Guest Speaker: Dr William Mack (Birmingham)
Oculus 1.02

Dr William Mack (University of Birmingham)

Title to be decided.

Dr William Mack is a Senior Lecturer in Ancient Greek History and Culture at the University of Birmingham. He specialises in the study of interstate relations between the Greek City states.

Wed, Jan 30, '19
15:30 - 16:30
Work in Progress Seminar
Oculus 1.02

Alessandra Tafaro (University of Warwick) "Obliterating Domitian's Memory: from Inscriptions to Martial's Epigrams 10."

Giles Penman (University of Warwick) "Classical motifs and the memorabilia of the Great War"

Wed, Feb 6, '19
16:00 - 17:00
WiP Guest Speaker: Prof. Michèle Lowrie (Chicago)
Oculus 1.02

Prof. Michèle Lowrie is Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Classics at the University of Chicago. Her reseach focuses on the intersection of ideology and literary form in Roman literature and its reception. She is the author of Writing, Performance, and Authority in Augustan Rome (OUP 2009) and Horace's Narrative Odes (OUP 1997). In 2018, she delivered the J.H. Gray Lecture at the University of Cambridge on the subject of the idea of security in Roman thought and literature.

Wed, Feb 20, '19
15:30 - 16:30
Work in Progress Seminar
Oculus 1.02

Dr Emmanuela Bakola (University of Warwick)

Charlotte Mann (University of Warwick and Macquarie University) "The Antonine Emperors in Roman Britain: A Numismatic Approach"

Wed, Feb 27, '19
16:00 - 17:00
WiP Guest Speaker: Prof. Dr. Andreas Schwab (LMU München)
Oculus 1.02

Prof. Dr. Andreas Schwab (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München)

Prof. Dr. Schwab specialises in ancient religion, Greek philosophy, historiography and Christian literature in late antiquity.

http://www.klassphil.uni-muenchen.de/personen/professoren/schwab_andreas/index.html

Organiser: LMU Munich

The event is sponsored by LMUexcellent (DFG Excellence Initiative).

Wed, Mar 6, '19
15:30 - 16:30
Work in Progress Seminar
Oculus 1.02
George Green (University of Oxford and University of Warwick)
Thu, Mar 7, '19
12:00 - 13:00
Classical Connections Public Lecture: Dr Tessa Roynon (Oxford) "Black Classicism: some theory, some practices and some dilemmas"
MS.04

Dr Tessa Roynon is Teaching and Research Fellow at the Rothermere American Institute at the University of Oxford. She is a specialist in modern North American literature, particularly African American literature, in Anglophone literature of the black diaspora, and in Classical Reception studies. She is the author of The Cambridge Introduction to Toni Morrison (CUP 2012), and Toni Morrison and the Classical Tradition (OUP 2013) and co-editor of the acclaimed interdisciplinary essay collection, African Athena: New Agendas (OUP 2011, with Daniel Orrells and Gurminder Bhambra).

The Lecture is generously funded by IATL as Public Lecture for the undergraduate module 'Africa and the Making of Classical Literature'.

Wed, Mar 13, '19
16:00 - 17:00
WiP Guest Speaker: Dr John Pearce (KCL) 'Hares, hounds and snares: tracking the hunt on Rome's frontiers and beyond'

Dr John Pearce (KCL)

'Hares, hounds and snares: tracking the hunt on Rome's frontiers and beyond'

Dr John Pearce is Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at KCL. His work covers Roman Archaeology in North-West Europe and Italy, with particular interest in the importance of landscapes, documents and literacy, death and burial and small finds.

Fri, Mar 15, '19
17:00 - 18:00
Classical Connections Public Lecture: Prof. Patrice Rankine (Richmond) "Classical Texts and Contemporary Images: American African Problems"
OC 0.01

Prof. Patrice Rankine is Professor of Classics and Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Richmond. His research focusses on African American literature and the reception of the Classics among black American authors. He is the author of Ulysses in Black: Ralph Ellison, Classicism, and African American Literature (The University of Wisconsin Press 2006), Aristotle and Black Drama: A Theater of Civil Disobedience (Waco: Baylor University Press, 2013) and co-editor of the Oxford University Handbook: Greek Drama in the Americas (with Kathryn Bosher, Fiona Macintosh, and Justine McConnell; Oxford University Press, 2015).

The Lecture is generously funded by IATL as Public Lecture for the undergraduate module 'Africa and the Making of Classical Literature'.

Wed, May 1, '19
16:00 - 17:00
WiP Seminar Guest Speakers: Dr Dan-el Padilla Peralta (Princeton) and Dr Sasha-Mae Eccleston (Brown)
Oculus 1.02

Dr Dan-el Padilla Peralta (Princeton University)

Dr Dan-el Padilla Peralta is Assistant Professor of Classics at Princeton University, where he is affiliated with the university's Center for Human Values and Program in Latino Studies. His work situates the religious and cultural history of the Roman Republic in diallogue with anthropology, sociology, economics, and comparative and global histories of slavery.

Dr Sasha-Mae Eccleston (Brown University) Title to be decided.

Dr Sasha-Mae Eccleston is Assistant Professor of Classics at Brown University. Her research examines the interstices between moral philosophy, ecocriticism, and literature from the Roman Empire (see her forthcoming monograph Humanizing Speech: Apuleius and the Ethics of Narration); Classical reception (throughout the African Diaspora); and critical race theory, Classics, and educational reform. Currently presiding over Eos: Africana Receptions of Ancient Greece and Rome, Dr. Eccleston hopes to meet students from underrepresented backgrounds in pre-modern fields to support their projects and to introduce them to the society’s initiatives. Co-founder of the conference series Racing the Classics, she is eager to involve international scholars and practitioners in the series’ next iteration. Discussions with the Department of Film and Television Studies at Warwick will be particularly valuable for her project on Classics and 9/11, Epic Events, which incorporates memory and museum as well as literary and media studies.

Thu, May 2, '19
18:00 - 19:00
Classical Connections - IAS VF Public Lecture: Dr Dan-el Padilla Peralta (Princeton) "The Etruscan Negro: from Coin to Memory to Racial Politics"

Dr Dan-el Padilla Peralta is Assistant Professor of Classics at Princeton University, where he is affiliated with the university's Center for Human Values and Program in Latino Studies. His work situates the religious and cultural history of the Roman Republic in diallogue with anthropology, sociology, economics, and comparative and global histories of slavery. In this public lecture, he will focus on the complicity of modern histories of Roman republican culture in the (re)production of colonial and postcolonial configurations of race.

The lecture is generously funded by the IAS.

Thu, May 9, '19
18:00 - 19:00
Classical Connections - IAS VF Public Lecture: Dr Sasha-Mae Eccleston (Brown) "Speaking (of) Greek: Reflections on Value in Post-9/11 Receptions of Epic"

Dr Sasha-Mae Eccleston is Assistant Professor of Classics at Brown University. Her research examines the interstices between moral philosophy, ecocriticism, and literature from the Roman Empire; Classical reception (throughout the African Diaspora); and critical race theory, Classics, and educational reform. This lecture is part of her ongoing project Epic Events, which explains how authors of works produced after 9/11, especially those from newly racialized groups in the U.S., use the Greco-Roman canon to negotiate the state’s efforts to define the terrorist attacks of 2001 as an epoch making event. Of interest to Americanists, scholars interested in museum studies, literature, popular culture, and ecocriticism.

The lecture is generously funded by the IAS.

Thu, May 16, '19
17:00 - 18:30
Classical Connections Seminar Lecture: Dr Thomas Biggs (Georgia) "Agamben, Iustitium, and the Poetic "State of Exception" in Lucan's Bellum Civile"

Dr Thomas Biggs is Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Georgia. He is an expert in Latin literature, and has worked especially on connections between epic and historiography, cultural history, poetics, Roman art and architecture and the Punic Wars.