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Classics News and Events

New publication: Caroline Petit, Galien de Pergame ou la rhétorique de la Providence

Out in September 2018: Caroline Petit’s book, Galien de Pergame ou la rhétorique de la Providence: Médecine, littérature et pouvoir à Rome is the first comprehensive study of the role of rhetoric in Galen’s œuvre. Physician to several Roman emperors and author of the most impressive body of works in antiquity up to AD 350, Galen created a compelling figure of authority through his medical and philosophical works. The book analyses the range of Galen’s rhetorical mastery through five chapters, studying in turn Galen and the Hellenic tradition, Galen’s demonstrative and refutative tactics, the role of enargeia in Galen’s descriptions and narratives, his ‘hymn’ to Nature in his main anatomical work, De usu partium, and finally autobiography and self-portrait in his œuvre.


Ancient Invisible Cities - Cairo, Athens, Istanbul - BBC2 - Professor Michael Scott

Professor Michael Scott's new BBC2 series Ancient Invisible Cities, focusing on the cities of Cairo, Athens and Istanbul, starts on Friday 7th September 9pm (Cairo), continuing on Friday 14th September (Athens) and Friday 21st September (Istanbul). In the programmes Michael abseils, climbs, and dives to reach incredible hidden ancient structures (some of which have never been filmed before), and works with a laser scanning team bring these ancient worlds to life in virtual reality.


Coin of the Month: Fulvia, the power behind the lion?

coin fulviaMasters student Jacqui Butler explores the role Fulvia played at the end of the Republic by discussing her representation on a coin series struck in Gaul. Read it here.


New open access publication: Ashmolean Latin Inscriptions Project

Abigail Baker and Alison Cooley, 'Breaking through the language barrier – bringing ‘dead’ languages to life through sensory and narrative engagement', Journal of Museum Management and Curatorship, https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09647775.2018.1501601

Abstract: Ancient inscriptions can be difficult to understand and off-putting to museum audiences, but they are packed with personal stories and vivid information about the people who made them. This article argues that overcoming the language barrier presented by these objects can offer a deep sense of engagement with the ancient world and explores possible ways of achieving this. It looks at examples of effective approaches from a range of European museums with a particular emphasis on bringing out the sensory, social, and narrative dimensions of these objects. It argues that inscriptions can change the way that museum visitors view the ancient world and empower them to interpret the past for themselves in new and creative ways.


Coin of the Month: Augustus and the Exaggeration of Military Victories

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In July's coin of the month, undergraduate student Dillon Patel explores how Augustus communicated his conquest of Armenia. Read about it here.


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