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Composite calendar

This is a composite calendar page template pulling in feeds from events calendars in department and research centre sites. It is purely used as a tool to collect the event details before filtering through to a publicly-visible calendar filter page template. To remove or add a feed to this composite calendar, please contact the IT Services Web Team (webteam at warwick dot ac dot uk).

Wednesday, February 05, 2020

 
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Migration, Identity and Translation Network: Lost in translation?
WBS Create Suite

The Migration, Identity and Translation Network (MITN) would like to invite you to our upcoming Shakespeare Workshop 'Lost in translation?'. We are an interdisciplinary research network based at Warwick and Monash that connects research students, early career researchers and senior academics who are interested in exploring issues relating to migration, identity, language and translation from various disciplinary perspectives. We would be delighted to welcome you to the following event...

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Warwick VR Festival

Runs from Wednesday, February 05 to Sunday, February 09.

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English & CLS - Research Seminar
H0.58

Whitman’s Touch: Toward a Haptic Reading of Whitman’s Leaves

Cécile Roudeau (Université de Paris)

 

Whitman’s poetry makes sense through, and makes sense to, the reader’s senses; his poems ask us to touch and be touched, to hold him, man and body, in hand. This paper will turn to Whitman’s other leaves, the manuscripts that have been digitized and are now available through a (mental) haptic gesture in the section “In Whitman’s Hand” of the Walt Whitman Archives website. Whitman, like Dickinson and others at the time, wrote his poems on scraps of papers, on the flap of envelopes, on the back of newspaper articles written by himself or others. Reading Whitman on both sides / reading both sides of Whitman allows us to reassemble what has been made distinct through the combined agency of printer, editor and poet: prose and poetry; political pamphlets and love jottings; Whitman the eccentric hobo and Whitman the clerk in Washington. Recovering this material if contingent contiguity confronts us with a messier trove than the neat arrangements of both the death-bed edition of his poems or the volume of Collected Prose have so far suggested. Allowing those different leaves to touch challenges our own critical and analytical practices and the legibility of his oeuvre, helping us to revisit a commonplace liaison in Whitman’s oeuvre, that of poetics and politics. More specifically in this paper, I propose that reading Whitman with both hands complicates the poet’s democratic thrust even as it recovers a little-known genealogy of an American experiment with regulatory governance.

 

Cécile Roudeau is professor of American literature at Université de Paris. Her first book (Université Paris Sorbonne, 2012) revisits the notion of “place” in New England regionalist writing, and argues that “taking place” was as much a political and epistemic claim as a spatial experience. She is currently working on a book project titled “Beyond Stateless Literature: Practices of Democratic Power in Nineteenth-Century US Letters.” This book follows her essay, written in French, on the “Fictions of the Commons in Nineteenth-century US Literature.” Cécile is also the current editor of Transatlantica, the on-line peer-reviewed journal of the French Association of American Studies.

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Event: Getting the Most out of Digital Source Collections Event
Wolfson Research Exchange Seminar Room 3 (Library Extension, Level 3)

A two part session for staff and students in the arts and humanities.

When: Wed 5th Feb, 1:30pm - 3pm

Where: Wolfson Research Exchange Seminar Room 3 (Library Extension, Level 3) 

Hosted by the Library Academic Support Librarians, Digital Arts Lab (DAL) and Academic Technology, ITS with external speakers Chris Houghton and Joanne Richardson from Gale.

Part 1: Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO) and other Gale Primary Source collections

Find out how to access this and other contemporary, early modern to modern period and newspapers/periodical resources* through Gale Primary Sources – if you are a regular user of JISC Historical Texts you might have questions about how to cross search with EEBO, how to make the best use of the database’s functionality, and how it compares to what you have been using.

*Seventeen archives available through Gale Primary Sources covering contemporary studies, early modern to modern period, newspapers and periodicals.

Part 2: Digital humanities tools and methodologies for working with texts

The second half of the session will explore how digital humanities tools and methodologies can be used with these primary sources, and their application to teaching and research. It will feature:

  • Named Entity Recognition
  • Parts of Speech Analysis
  • Topic Modelling

Bring your own device with a browser to get hands-on in the session. The digital humanities tools and methodologies will be demonstrated using the Gale Digital Scholar Lab - not currently available for staff/student use.

More information and registration at: warwick.ac.uk/digitalhumanities/events

 

 

 

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Getting the most out of primary source collections
Wolfson Research Exchange Seminar Room 3 (Library Extension, Level 3)

A two part session for staff and students in the arts and humanities.

Hosted by the Library Academic Support Librarians, Digital Arts Lab (DAL) and Academic Technology, ITS with external speakers Chris Houghton and Joanne Richardson from Gale.

Part 1: Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO) and other Gale Primary Source collections

Find out how to access this and other contemporary, early modern to modern period and newspapers/periodical resources* through Gale Primary Sources – if you are a regular user of JISC Historical Texts you might have questions about how to cross search with EEBO, how to make the best use of the database’s functionality, and how it compares to what you have been using.

*Seventeen archives available through Gale Primary Sources covering contemporary studies, early modern to modern period, newspapers and periodicals.

Part 2: Digital humanities tools and methodologies for working with texts

The second half of the session will explore how digital humanities tools and methodologies can be used with these primary sources, and their application to teaching and research. It will feature:

  • Named Entity Recognition
  • Parts of Speech Analysis
  • Topic Modelling

Bring your own device with a browser to get hands-on in the session. The digital humanities tools and methodologies will be demonstrated using the Gale Digital Scholar Lab - not currently available for staff/student use.

Please register to attend

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Queer History - Nanette Screening & Discussion
S0.18 & S0.20
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GHCC seminar on Historicizing imaginaries of collective property: a view from South Africa
R1.13 Ramphal Building

a seminar with Tara Weinberg, Michigan University

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Global History seminar on Historicizing Imaginaries of Collective Property: A View from South Africa
R1.13 Ramphal Building

Tara Weinberg (Michigan University)

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Work in Progress Seminar
OC1.02

Dr Regine May (Leeds) ‘Love hurts: Cupid and Psyche on magic gemstones’ 

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Applied Linguistics Seminar Series: Warwick Applied Linguistics’ Research Activity Group overview
S0.10 Social Sciences Building

On 05/02 the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series welcomes Prof Tony Liddicoat, Drs Tilly Harrison, Richard Smith, Daniel Dauber, Katharina Lefringhausen, & Kieran File from the University of Warwick to discuss Warwick Applied Linguistics’ Research Activity Group overview

All talks take place from 1600-1700 in S0.10

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Applied Linguistics Seminar Series: Warwick Applied Linguistics’ Research Activity Group overview
S0.10 Social Sciences Building

On 05/02 the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series welcomes Prof Tony Liddicoat, Drs Tilly Harrison, Richard Smith, Daniel Dauber, Katharina Lefringhausen, & Kieran File from the University of Warwick to discuss Warwick Applied Linguistics’ Research Activity Group overview

All talks take place from 1600-1700 in S0.10

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Research Seminar: Dr Clive Nwonka (LSE): 'The Black Neo-liberal Aesthetic'
A0.28, Millburn House
Research Seminar: Dr Clive Nwonka (LSE): ' The Black Neo-liberal Aesthetic'
Date: 05/02/2020
Time: 4.30pm (followed by drinks reception)
Venue: A0.28 (Millburn House)
All welcome
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Feminist Reading Group
H50.02
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Warwick in London: Film and Television Studies Information Evening

Do you have pure passion for the moving image, its stars, genres and history, or an academic curiosity? Learn about the ambitious and innovative Film and Television degrees at Warwick. Ranked 2nd in the Guardian University 2019 in Media and Film Studies and 7th in the UK according to the Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2018.

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Environmental Humanities Network Events
SOCIAL STUDIES BUILDING - SO.13

Excavating the Anthropocene

Marcus Boon (York University, Toronto), “Vibration-In-Itself: Sound, Humanism and the Anthropocene”