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WMG in £2 million programme to help SAVVY drivers avoid collisions and accidents

WMG, at the University of Warwick, are the academic research leads in a new £2 million Innovate UK funded research programme that will help create new forms of technological assistance to help drivers to avoid collisions and accidents

Advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) are systems developed to automate and/or enhance vehicle systems for safety and better driving. Safety features are designed to avoid collisions and accidents by offering technologies that alert the driver to potential problems, or to avoid collisions by implementing safeguards. There is an increasing demand for new techniques to enable the robust design and verification & validation (V&V) of ADAS features in a safe, repeatable, controlled and scientifically rigorous environment.

This new project entitled Smart ADAS Verification and Validation Methodology (SAVVY) is a collaboration between: WMG, at the University of Warwick, AVL Powertrain UK Ltd, Vertizan Ltd, Myrtle Software, and Horiba MIRA. The project brings together the learning and innovations from 3 previous successful Innovate UK funded feasibility studies. It will also showcase the novel contribution of the WMG 3xD Simulator for Intelligent Vehicles in an efficient simulation based V&V process for ADAS technologies.

WMG principal engineer Gunny Dhadyalla said:

“Seventeen hundred people died in vehicle collisions in the UK in 2013. These accidents have a £16bn annual cost to the UK economy. By 2030, 2.4 million people are expected to be killed in road traffic accidents world wide. 90% of all accidents are caused by driver error. If the primary objective of our project is achieved, the deployment of safety related automotive technology can be accelerated. By increasing the productivity and quality of system and software verification in this sector through the use of simulation, the confidence in more automated driving systems will be increased, and many lives could be saved”