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“Academic excellence with industrial relevance has always been at the heart of what we do….it’s what makes us unique”

Professor Lord Bhattacharyya Kt CBE FREng FRS
Regius Professor of Manufacturing
Chairman and Founder

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Budding young engineers pick up four awards

On 11 July, our Dr Antony Allen and students from Richard Crosse Primary School in Staffordshire went to Rockingham Speedway to compete in the Greenpower Formula Goblin event. We first met the children from class five back in January when they won a competition run by the Advanced Propulsion Centre to become one of eight schools presented with a Greenpower Goblin kit car. Each winning school was then partnered with an APC Spoke, in this case WMG as the Energy Spoke, who provide financial support and mentoring throughout the electric vehicle build along with driver training ahead of race day.

On race day the team competed in six Slaloms, six Sprints and one Grandprix event. They picked up a fantastic four awards: IET Formula Goblin Participation Award; Rockingham Goblins 2018 Slalom: 3rd place; Rockingham Goblins 2018 Best Presented Team; and Rockingham Goblins 2018 Spirit of Greenpower Award.

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Professor Lord Bhattacharyya receives honorary degree

Professor Lord Bhattacharyya received an honorary degree for his contribution to science and engineering, from the University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB) on Friday (29 June 2018). The degree was conferred by the University of Science and Technology Beijing, and the conferment was approved by the Academic Degrees Committee of the State Council of China.

China has been very interested in how Professor Lord Bhattacharyya has created effective innovative approaches to science and technology, over the past 40 years, and the huge successes that WMG has had nationally and internationally.

Professor Lord Bhattacharyya, Chairman and Founder of WMG, said: “I am delighted to be awarded an honorary degree for my contribution to science and engineering, and honoured to receive this from such a prestigious university.”

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Dr Kogila Balakrishnan launches Technology Offsets in International Defence Procurement

Dr Kogila Balakrishnan, WMG’s Director of Client and Business Development, has written a new book entitled Technology Offsets in International Defence Procurement.

This is the first book to focus on both the theory and practice of offsets, combining developmental economic theories, technology theories, business and management theories and international business practice.

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New report says UK electric vehicle battery industry could be worth £2.7 billion per year for UK chemical companies

A new report published today Monday 25th June 2018 shows that UK companies are well-placed to supply valuable materials needed for batteries to be built in UK – a potential £2.7 billion per year business opportunity. The report commissioned by WMG at the University of Warwick, was launched to the Chemical Industry Association at the Chemistry Growth Partnership meeting in London, chaired by Steve Foots, Chief Executive of Croda, and attended by Richard Harrington MP.

The research underpinning the report brought together experts and data from the automotive battery industry and chemicals industry, working in the context of the UK’s Industrial Strategy, points to a large UK battery manufacturing industry opportunity. The report was funded by EPSRC, commissioned and managed by WMG at the University of Warwick acting in their role as the Advanced Propulsion Centre Electrical Energy Storage Spoke, and delivered in partnership with E4tech. WMG’s Professor David Greenwood, one of the report’s authors said:

“This report details a massive opportunity to grow a UK battery chemicals industry and related supply chain. The UK’s Industrial Strategy identified battery development and manufacture as one of the four initial Grand Challenges to coalesce industrial activity upon high growth opportunities. Battery pack manufacturing for electric vehicles (EVs) will logically take place close to the point of vehicle assembly since packs are hard to transport. This in turn implies that the battery cells which make up the packs will best be manufactured in (or close to) the UK. This could also mitigate the loss of vehicle engine production.”

“However for cell production to occur in the UK, the supply chains of chemicals would need to be reconfigured, since most cell production and chemicals supply is currently in Asia. Whilst such components could be imported, to capture the most value cell production and the related chemical and process equipment supply would need to come from UK suppliers.”

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