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2: Your Degree Course

In this section of the Handbook, you can access information on the rules, regulations, procedures and policies associated with your degree course. We would advise that you familiarise yourself with these.

Introduction to our Degree Courses

The Department of Economics operates two single honours degree courses and is involved in 11 joint honours degree courses.

Single Honours Courses

BSc Economics (L100)
BSc Economics and Industrial Organisation (L116/L112)

Joint Honours Courses housed within the Department of Economics

BSc/BA Economics, Politics and International Studies (LM1D/LLD2)

BSc Mathematics and Economics (GL11)

Other Joint Honours Courses

BSc/BA Philosophy, Politics and Economics (V7ML)

BSc Maths, Operational Research, Statistics and Economics (MORSE) (Y602)

BASc Economic Studies and Global Sustainable Development (L1L8)

BA Liberal Arts - Pathway through Economics (LA99)

BA Modern Languages and Economics (R9L1) (including a range of specific programmes)

BA Hispanic Studies and Economics (R4L1)

BA French Studies and Economics (R1L1)

BA German Studies and Economics (R2L1)

BA Italian Studies and Economics (R3L2)

We aim to provide an advanced education in economics that is valuable both intellectually and professionally. By the time you leave, you should not just know a lot about economics, you should also be able to define and solve economic problems and take part in the advancement of economic ideas.

Please note that this Handbook is applicable to students on L100, L116/L112, LM1D/LLD2, GL11. All other students taking joint degrees with Economics should check their home Department's Handbook for more information or contact the Joint Degrees Officer, Dr. Stefania Paredes Fuentes or the Joint Programmes Coordinator, Tina MacSkimming.

Modules and CATS points

Each degree course is comprised of a number of core (compulsory) modules, together with optional modules. A module is typically based on a series of lectures and/or module Support and Feedback classes covering a specific field or set of fields in Economics.

Each University module has its own code, e.g. EC108 for Macroeconomics 1. This code tells you three things:

  • EC - the two letters tell you the department (e.g. EC for Economics)
  • 1 - the first letter tells you the year of study (1, 2, or 3 for undergraduate, 9 for postgraduate)
  • 08 - the other digits are the module's serial number.

Your degree course regulations set out which modules you must take each year. These are the subject requirements. For example, you take modules in microeconomics, macroeconomics and quantitative techniques.

Each module is worth a given number of CATS, which stands for Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme, and every UK university has one. Every module has a CATS rating. Your degree course regulations also set out how many CATS you must take each year and hence how many optional modules you are required to choose. These are the workload requirements. The First Year carries between 138-150 CATS (depending on your degree course). Second Year and Final Year carry 120 CATS each (excluding GL11). One CAT represents 10 hours of learning time.

Core modules

Core modules are compulsory and are determined by your degree course regulations. You do not need to register for core modules; simply check your timetable on Tabula. The core modules in each course will enable you to acquire a grounding in the subject of economics. For example, you must take modules in microeconomics, macroeconomics and quantitative techniques.

Optional modules

Optional modules are non-compulsory modules which can be used either to develop a specialisation (for example in economic theory or statistics) or to broaden your approach into various applied topics (for example history, development, or industry and labour). In the process, you will strengthen your existing skills (e.g. taking notes and writing reports) and acquire new ones (e.g. the use of specialised computer software).

Sometimes you have a choice between core modules, which are thus referred to as 'optional core modules.' For example, EPAIS students majoring in Economics must take either EC203 or EC226, but may choose which, hence EC203 and EC226 are optional core modules for EPAIS students. In contrast, EC226 is a core module for both L100 and L116 students, for example.

It is your responsibility to ensure that you have selected the correct number of optional modules each year to meet your degree course regulations and that you have registered for your modules correctly. Depending on which modules you have taken in your First Year and on your degree course regulations, you may wish to consider the possibility of taking modules in other departments in the University, especially from other Social Sciences departments. Further information is available in the next section of the Handbook.

Economics modules are normally a mixture of 30 and 15 CAT modules, but some modules are worth 6, 12 or 24 CATS:

  • 12/15 CAT modules are normally taught over one term (either autumn or spring)
  • Economics students can only take modules at 15 or 30 CATS within the Department, excluding the components of the 30 CAT module EC120, where individual modules are 6 and 12 CATS
  • please note that over-catting (taking more than the number of CATS required for a specific year) is not possible (excluding GL11).

Because of historical differences among departments, there are sometimes discrepancies in the weights which departments attach to their modules. For example, Warwick Business School (WBS), which provides IB-coded modules, many of which are taken by Economics students, normally values them at 24 CATS for a full-weight module or 12 CATS for a half-weight (one-term) module. Some departments (e.g. WBS and Language Centre) offer modules approved for students on Economics-related degree courses in both 12/24 CAT and 15/30 CAT variants. First year students should choose the 12/24 CAT variant. Second and Final Year students, excluding GL11, must choose the 15/30 CAT variant.

You can access a full list of the Economics module descriptors on the Department's webpages.

Honours degrees

The undergraduate degree involves three or four years of study at Warwick and leads to a Bachelor of Science (BSc) or Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree. The first year is preparatory, so the results are not classified (First class, Upper Second class, and so on) and, with the exception of Mathematics and Economics (GL11), do not count towards your final degree class. In some modules the summer examination is combined with a number of other assignments, including tests and essays taken during the year, which collectively determine your final module mark. You must pass your core first-year modules to progress to the second year of your degree. Students who fail first-year core modules may resit the summer examination (where the resit is worth 100% of the module mark) once only, usually in September. For further information on progression requirements for each year, go to the section on Exam Boards, Progression and resits.

Warwick degrees can be awarded with Honours or as Pass degrees. Honours are awarded in First, Upper-second, Lower-second and Third classes. The class of Honours awarded depends upon coursework and examination results in the second and final years. The second and final years carry equal weight, again with the exception of GL11 Mathematics and Economics (where the weight is 10:40:50), and contribute cumulatively to your final degree class. Please see University rules on degree conventions.

A Pass degree may be considered for those who fail several second and final year modules. Students may also be considered for an Exit Award if they pass a set number of CATS. More information on classifications and pass degrees can be found in section 4 on Assessments and Examinations.

Course specifications

There is a course specification for every undergraduate and taught Masters course. Each course specification sets out the aims of the course, the skills and knowledge a graduate from that course will possess, and how it is taught and assessed. Each course specification can be found on the course specifications section of the website.

How we teach and how you learn

Teaching and learning, assessment and feedback

We have always been focused on enhancing teaching and learning and the main elements of the teaching process in our Department are lectures, module Support and Feedback classes, assessed work, examinations and Advice and Feedback hours. Through the richness of the curricula and syllabi, you are able to develop a range of skills, capacities and capabilities, which are designed to meet the aims and learning objectives of the courses and modules. It is appropriate that different learning objectives are assessed in different ways and this is reflected in a wide variety of types of both formative and summative assessment.

As a Department we are mindful of the different academic backgrounds of our students, particularly those who come to us from outside of the EU. We are aware that the UK higher education system may be very different to systems in which you have previously studied. With this in mind, we do our best to help familiarize you with the academic culture in the UK, particularly around how learning takes place in lectures and classes, approaches to assessment, expected standards of work, marking and plagiarism.

Our assessment arrangements, based on both end-of-year examinations and on assessed work through the year, contrast with those in other highly-regarded departments of economics in other UK universities where practice is often based solely on end-of-year (or even end-of-course) examinations. The continuous nature of assessment motivates you to study effectively throughout the academic year and provides opportunities for continuous feedback, thereby encouraging deeper learning and reflection.

We have a rigorous and robust marking and moderation process, as set out in our assessment and feedback strategy for all assessments. By setting out the rigorous steps taken in marking assessments, we aim to create a transparent and trustworthy system, such that you can be confident in the assessment process and in the marks you receive. You are not permitted to question the validity of your mark on any assessed work, as academic judgement cannot be challenged, but you are encouraged to use all the forms of feedback available to clarify and deepen your understanding and knowledge.

You will receive a grade and comments on assessed work; this is just one form of feedback. Where relevant, the lecturer will also provide generic feedback about what was expected, together with reflections on what you typically did well or where you might have struggled. Feedback also comes in many other forms and you should take advantage of them all. The two Advice and Feedback hours that all academic staff hold weekly are prime opportunities for you to receive one-to-one feedback. Module Support and Feedback classes allow you to review exercises, discuss questions, gain feedback from your tutor, as well as providing opportunities for peer-to-peer feedback. Problem-set solutions (verbal or written) are another form of feedback and you are encouraged to use module Support and Feedback classes and Advice and Feedback hours to discuss them. We also use discussion forums for some individual modules, where you can post questions and comments and receive feedback from the module team.

We encourage you to make use of all opportunities for feedback, as a means of developing your skills, reflecting on your work and enhancing your student experience.

Contact hours

These are designed to be high in the first year but will diminish so that when entering your final year you will be a more independent learner, ready for the next step beyond your undergraduate degree.

Lectures

In most modules, lectures take place twice a week. Lectures transmit information and define the syllabus. What happens in a lecture depends partly on the lecturer, the content and the size of the group. A larger audience allows us to transmit information to many students simultaneously but cuts down the scope for interaction. With larger numbers, the lecture tends to be more formal and to follow the lecturer’s script more rigidly.

Taking notes in lectures will help you stay alert; the experts call this “promoting concentration.” Studies show that going over your notes later on the day of the lecture produces a significant improvement in understanding and retention. But attending lectures alone is not sufficient for you to acquire an active grasp of economics.

Module Support and Feedback Classes

'Module Support and Feedback classes,' 'seminars,' 'classes,' 'tutorials' and 'supervisions' are all different names for essentially the same thing; compulsory teaching in small groups. Module Support and Feedback classes allow for more informal, less scripted interaction. Each of these classes is managed by a tutor who will:

  • invite you to raise problems
  • provide feedback on your understanding of material
  • lead discussion
  • invite you to lead discussion, usually after some preparation
  • assign and grade coursework
  • record your attendance, participation and marks
  • offer you any individual advice, in or out of the module Support and Feedback class.

Your preparation for module Support and Feedback classes and participation in the class discussions are essential to your economics education. Here are some reasons for this:

  • through your independent reading and discussion with others you will be exposed to a variety of viewpoints, learn to choose among them, and you will be better prepared to develop your own distinctive ideas
  • by discussing the module materials with other students you will identify common problems and misunderstandings and overcome them
  • studies show that students remember a far higher proportion of the material they have actively discussed, compared with the proportion of material they have heard passively
  • by preparing presentations, collaborating with others, and engaging in debate you will develop your own transferable skills which will prove invaluable in post-university employment.

Reading lists, lecture hand-outs and examination papers

Copies of reading lists and other module lecture notes and handouts are normally distributed during or ahead of lectures and module Support and Feedback classes and are available on the individual module pages on the Moodle. Copies of past examination papers are also available. You can access each module's reading list through the Talis Aspire system.

Higher Education Achievement Report (HEAR)

The University of Warwick issues a Higher Education Achievement Report (HEAR) to all undergraduate students. This is the official record of your academic achievements, including module marks and your Personal Development Module results from your time at the University. The HEAR is issued as an electronic document and also provides information about your degree course and some additional achievements undertaken whilst at university. It is hoped that the information provided on the HEAR will prove useful both to graduates entering the job market and to potential employers, as well as to current students as a formative document.

Find out further information about the HEAR.

Degree Course Regulations

Degree Course Regulations are simply the rules by which each degree operates in terms of its structure. The regulations exist to ensure that the content of the degree courses remains relevant and the quality remains high. The various rules and restrictions ensure that the degree content is not unduly diluted whilst allowing you the flexibility to make choices and to tailor your degree to your particular interests. It is important that you familiarise yourself with the regulations for your degree course by carefully reading the relevant pages below, as failure to adhere to them can have serious consequences.

You should regard your degree course regulations as being largely static throughout your time in the Department. However, you should also be aware that the Department does sometimes have occasion to amend these regulations. We do this for positive reasons: we want to keep the content of your degree course up to date and reflective of exciting developments and trends in the field; we may have new academic staff joining us with new perspectives and ideas for new modules; or we may want to revise the year in which a module is taught, for pedagogical reasons. Sometimes, we may need to adjust the CATS weighting of a module, or revisit which students should be able to take it and which term it is taught in. On other occasions, we may feel it’s necessary to suspend or discontinue a module, perhaps because of staffing changes or in order to keep our curriculum fresh and dynamic. Whatever the reason is for such changes to your degree course, the Department is committed to consulting with you prior to major changes to our degree courses. This consultation may happen via the Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) or through wider means. If you are affected by major changes to the curriculum, degree course regulations and other regulatory changes, you will be informed by the Department in a timely manner. Should you need advice on any aspect of your degree course regulations, please contact the UG Office.

Concerning the availability of modules, we cannot guarantee that all modules listed in this Handbook will be available each year or that the same lecturers will continue to deliver the modules. There are reasons why at times the Department may have to remove or make changes to a module:

  • a module teacher going on study leave
  • academic staff leaving Warwick
  • another module is made available so the current one is removed to avoid overlap
  • continuous review of the curriculum and teaching methods to ensure we are teaching relevant and interesting material
  • the need to ensure that assessment methods are the most suitable for a particular module.

Please note that optional modules may have pre-requisites and restrictions. It is your responsibility to check that you comply with these. It is also your responsibility to ensure you meet the degree regulations for your degree course, by choosing the correct modules in each year.

You can view the Regulation 8 (Regulations for First Degrees) for more information. You should read the regulations for your Degree in the next section.

BSc Economics (L100) Regulations

First-Year Course Structure

In the first year you must take modules totalling between 144 and 150 CATS as follows: core modules worth 120 CATS and option modules worth at least 24 CATS. Some first-year modules are pre-requisites for certain second (EC200 coded) and final year (EC300 coded) modules. Some optional modules require approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies or his/her deputy. You are advised to take a balanced load across the autumn and spring terms, so if you take two 15 CAT modules, one of them should be in the autumn term and the other in the spring term.

What is required to pass your first year and progress to the second year?

The decision whether you have passed your first year and may be permitted to proceed to the second year is made by a Faculty First Year Board of Examiners which sits in June and September each year.

For the degree of BSc (Hons) Economics, the modules marked below in the table as ‘Required Core Modules’ must be passed (with a mark of at least 40%) in order to proceed to the second year. In addition, you must achieve a CATS weighted average of at least 40% across all modules. Find out more about First Year Boards of Examiners’ Conventions.

First-year students on this degree course must also take the compulsory Personal Development Module, which is non-credit bearing.

Code Required Core Modules CATS
EC108 Macroeconomics 1 30
EC109 Microeconomics 1 30
EC120 Quantitative Techniques 30
EC104 The World Economy: History and Theory 30
Code Optional Modules CATS
EC119 Mathematical Analysis 15
EC132 The Industrial Economy: Strategy
15
EC133 Linear Algebra 15
EC134 Topics in Applied Economics 1a 15
EC135 Topics in Applied Economics 1b 15
EC138 Introduction to Environmental Economics 15
  An approved language module 24/30
 

Any other module on the List of Approved Modules for First Year Students

Minimum of 24 (or 2 x 12)

NB: we cannot guarantee that all optional modules listed in this handbook will be available each year or that the same lecturers will continue to deliver the modules.

The list of approved modules for first-year students is not exhaustive. If outside options not on the list appeal to you, please ensure that you complete an Unusual Options Request Form and obtain permission from the department offering the module. Whether or not the outside option is approved, you must ensure that you register correctly for the module, following that department’s procedure, but also registering on the eVision Module Registration (eMR) system. You should go to the UG Office if you have concerns about the modules you are registered to take. Note that normally you are permitted to take only 100-coded modules in the first year, with the exception of languages. IB modules must be taken at 12 CATS.

First-year students in Economics are not permitted to take optional modules worth less than 12 CATS.

Second-Year Course Structure

Candidates for Honours take modules during the second and final years to make a total of 240 CATS as follows: in the second year, core modules worth 90 CATS and option modules worth 30 CATS, and in the final year, core modules worth 30 CATS and option modules worth 90 CATS.

The following restrictions apply:

Within the 120 CATS total of option modules chosen in the second and final years combined, you must include i) EC coded-modules worth at least 60 CATS and ii) 300-coded modules worth at least 60 CATS. You are not permitted to take 100-coded modules in the second or final year.

Certain combinations of modules are not permitted, and there are pre-requisites for some modules (see information on Restrictions and Pre-requisites for details). You are permitted to take only 30 CATS of WBS modules in each of your second and final years.

Code Core Modules CATS
EC201 Macroeconomics 2 30
EC202 Microeconomics 2 30
EC226 Econometrics 1 30
Code Optional Modules CATS
EC205 Development Economics (Macroeconomics) 15
EC208 Industrial Economics 1: Market Structure 15
EC220 Mathematical Economics 1a* 15
EC221 Mathematical Economics 1b* 15
EC224 War and Economy in the 20th Century 15
EC228 Collective Decisions* 15
EC230 Economics of Money and Banking 15
EC231 Industrial Economics 1: Strategic Behaviour 15
EC233 Development Economics (Microeconomics) 15
EC235 Topics in Applied Economics 2a 15
EC236 Topics in Applied Economics 2b 15
  An approved language module 30
  Any other module on the List of Approved Modules for Second-year Students 30 or 2x15

An asterisk (*) indicates that certain restrictions may apply to your choice of module.

NB: we cannot guarantee that all optional modules listed in this Handbook will be available each year or that the same lecturers will continue to deliver the modules.

The List of Approved Modules for second-year Students is not exhaustive. If outside options not on the list appeal to you, please ensure that you complete the Unusual Options Request Form and obtain permission from the department offering the module. Whether or not the outside option is approved, you must ensure that you register correctly for the module, following that Department's procedure, but also registering on the eVision Module Registration (eMR) system. You should go to the UG Office if you have concerns about the modules you are registered to take. Note that normally you are permitted to take 200-coded modules in the second year.

Second-year students are not normally permitted to take modules worth less than 15 CATS for credit.

Final-Year Course Structure

Candidates for Honours take modules during the second and final years to make a total of 240 CATS as follows: in the second year, core modules worth 90 CATS and option modules worth 30 CATS, and in the final year, core modules worth 30 CATS and option modules worth 90 CATS. The following restrictions apply:

Within the 120-CATS total option modules chosen in the second and final years combined, you must include i) EC-coded modules worth at least 60 CATS credits and ii) 300-coded modules worth at least 60 CATS credits. You are not permitted to take 100-coded modules in the second or final year, unless specified otherwise in information on Restrictions and Pre-requisites.

Certain combinations of modules are not permitted, and there are pre-requisites for some modules (see information on Restrictions and Pre-requisites for details). You are permitted to take only 30 CATS of WBS modules in each of your second and final years.

Code Core Module CATS
EC331 Research in Applied Economics 30
Code Optional Modules CATS
EC301 Mathematical Economics 2: Dynamics, Uncertainty and Asymmetric Information* 15
EC303 The British Economy in the 20th Century 15
EC306 Econometrics 2: Time Series* 15
EC307 Macroeconomic Policy in the EU 15
EC310 Topics in Development Economics 15
EC312 International Economics 15
EC313 The International Economic System Since 1918 15
EC314 Topics in Economic Theory 15
EC318 Labour Economics 15
EC320 Economics of Public Policy 15
EC326 Industrial Economics 2: Practice and Strategy* 15
EC333 Topics in Financial Economics: Theories and International Finance 15
EC334 Topics in Financial Economics: Corporate Finance and Markets* 15
EC336 International Trade 15
EC337 Industrial Economics 2: Market Economics, Competition and Regulation* 15
EC338 Econometrics 2: Microeconometrics 15
EC339 Applied Macroeconomics 15
EC340 Topics in Applied Economics (a) 15
EC341 Mathematical Economics 2: Political Economy 15
EC343 Topics in Applied Economics (b) 15
EC345 Behavioural Economics 15
  An approved language module 30
  Any other modules from the List of Approved Modules for Final-Year Students, subject to regulations 30 or 2 x 15

An asterisk (*) indicates that certain restrictions may apply to your choice of module.

NB: we cannot guarantee that all optional modules listed in this Handbook will be available each year or that the same lecturers will deliver the modules.

The lists of approved modules for final-year students are not exhaustive. If outside options not on the list appeal to you, please ensure that you complete an Unusual Options Request Form and obtain permission from the department offering the module. Whether or not the outside option is approved, you must ensure that you register correctly for the module, following that department’s procedure, but also registering on the eVision Module Registration (eMR) system. You should go to the UG Office if you have concerns about the modules you are registered to take. Note that normally you are permitted to take only 200-coded or 300-coded modules in the third year.

Please note that final-year L100 students are not permitted to take EC200-coded modules.

Final-year students are not normally permitted to take modules worth less than 15 CATS for credit.

BSc Economics and Industrial Organisation (L116/L112) Regulations

First Year Course Structure

You will take modules totalling between 138 and 147 CATS as follows: core modules worth 102 CATS and optional modules worth at least 36 CATS. Some first-year modules are pre-requisites for certain second- and final-year modules. Some optional modules require approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies or his/her deputy. You are advised to take a balanced load across the autumn and spring terms, so if you take two 15 CAT modules, one of them should be in the autumn term and the other in the spring term.

What is required to pass the first year and progress to the second year?

The decision whether you have passed your first year and may be permitted to proceed to the second year is made by a Faculty First Year Board of Examiners which sits in June and September each year.

For the degree of BSc (Hons) Economics and Industrial Organisation, the modules marked below in the table as ‘Required Core Modules’ must be passed (with a mark of at least 40%) in order to proceed to the second year. In addition, you must achieve a CATS weighted average of at least 40% across all modules. Find out more about First Year Boards of Examiners’ Conventions.

First-year students on this degree course must also take the compulsory Personal Development Module, which is non-credit bearing.

Code Required Core Modules CATS
EC108 Macroeconomics 1 30
EC109 Microeconomics 1 30
EC120 Quantitative Techniques 30
IB132 Foundations of Finance 12
Code Optional Modules CATS
EC104 The World Economy: History and Theory 30
EC119 Mathematical Analysis 15
EC132 The Industrial Economy: Strategy 15
EC133 Linear Algebra 15
EC134 Topics in Applied Economics 1a 15
EC135 Topics in Applied Economics 1b 15
EC138 Introduction to Environmental Economics 15
  An approved language module 24/30
  Any other module on the List of Approved Modules for First Year Students Minimum of 24 or 2x12

NB: We cannot guarantee that all optional modules listed in this Handbook will be available each year or that the same lecturers will continue to deliver modules.

The list of approved modules for first-year students is not exhaustive. If outside options not on the list appeal to you, please ensure that you complete the Unusual Options Request Form and obtain permission from the department offering the module. Whether or not the outside option is approved, you must ensure that you register correctly for the module, following that department's procedure, but also registering on the eVision Module Registration (eMR) system. You should go to the UG Office if you have concerns about the modules you are registered to take. Note that normally you are permitted to take only 100-coded modules in the first year, with the exception of languages. IB modules must be taken at 12 CATS.

First-year students are not permitted to take modules worth less than 12 CATS.

Second Year Course Structure

Candidates for Honours take modules during the second and final years to make a total of 240 CATS as follows: in the second year, core modules worth 120 CATS and in the final year, core modules worth 60 CATS and option modules worth 60 CATS. The following restrictions apply:

  • within the 60 CATS of optional modules taken in the final year, candidates must include no more than 30 CATS of 200-coded modules
  • you are not permitted to take 100-coded modules in the second or final years, unless specified otherwise in information on Restrictions and Pre-requisites.

Certain combinations of modules are not permitted, and there are pre-requisites for some modules (see information on Restrictions and Pre-requisites).

Code Core Modules CATS
EC201 Macroeconomics 2 30
EC202 Microeconomics 2 30
EC226 Econometrics 1 30
EC208 Industrial Economics 1: Market Structure 15
EC231 Industrial Economics 1: Strategic Behaviour 15

Final Year Course Structure

Candidates for honours take modules during the second and final years to make a total of 240 CATS as follows: in the second year, core modules worth 120 CATS, and in the final year, core modules worth 60 CATS and optional modules worth 60 CATS. The following restrictions apply:

  • within the 60 CATS of optional modules taken in the final year, candidates must include no more than 30 CATS of 200-coded modules
  • you are not permitted to take 100-coded modules in the second or final years, unless specified otherwise in information on Restrictions and Pre-requisites.

Certain combinations of modules are not permitted, and there are pre-requisites for some modules (see information on Restrictions and Pre-requisites). You are permitted to take only 30 CATS of WBS modules in your final year.

Code Core Modules CATS
EC326 Industrial Economics 2: Practice and Strategy 15
EC337 Industrial Economics 2: Market Economics, Competition and Regulation* 15
EC331 Research in Applied Economics 30
Code Optional Modules CATS
EC301 Mathematical Economics 2: Dynamics Uncertainty and Asymmetric Information 15
EC303 The British Economy in The 20th Century 15
EC306 Econometrics 2: Time series* 15
EC307 Macroeconomic Policy in the EU 15
EC310 Topics in Development Economics 15
EC312 International Economics 15
EC313 The International Economic System Since 1918 15
EC314 Topics in Economic Theory 15
EC318 Labour Economics 15
EC320 Economics of Public Policy 15
EC333 Topics in Financial Economics: Theories and International Finance 15
EC334 Topics in Financial Economics: Corporate Finance and Markets* 15
EC336 International Trade 15
EC338 Econometrics 2: Microeconometrics 15
EC339 Applied Macroeconomics 15
EC340 Topics in Applied Economics (3a) 15
EC341 Mathematical Economics 2: Political Economy 15
EC343 Topics in Applied Economics (3b) 15
EC345 Behavioural Economics 15
  Any EC200-coded optional module* 30 or 2x15
  An approved language module 30
 

Any other modules from either the List of Approved Modules for Second-year Students, or the List of Approved Modules for Final-year Students subject to regulations

30 or 2x15

An asterisk (*) indicates that certain restrictions may apply to your choice of module.

NB: we cannot guarantee that all optional modules listed in this Handbook will be available each year or that the same lectures will continue to deliver the modules.

The lists of approved modules for final-year students are not exhaustive. If outside options not on the list appeal to you, please ensure that you complete an Unusual Options Request Form and obtain permission from the department offering the module. Whether or not the outside option is approved, you must ensure that you register correctly for the module, following that department’s procedure, but also registering on the eVision Module Registration (eMR) system. You should go to the UG Office if you have concerns about the modules you are registered to take. Note that normally you are permitted to take only 200-coded or 300-coded modules in the final year.

Final-year students are not normally permitted to take modules worth less than 15 CATS for credit.

BSc/BA Economics, Politics and International Studies (LM1D/LLD2) Regulations

First Year Course Structure

Students take core modules totalling between 144 and 150 CATS as follows: core modules worth 120 CATS and option modules worth at least 24 CATS. Some first-year modules are pre-requisites for certain second- and final-year modules. Some optional modules require approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies or his/her deputy. You are advised to take a balanced load across the autumn and spring terms, so if you take two 15 CAT modules, one of them should be in the autumn term and the other in the spring term.

What is required to pass the first year and progress to the second year?

The decision whether you have passed your first year and may be permitted to proceed to the second year is made by a Faculty First Year Board of Examiners which sits in June and September each year.

For the degree of BSc (Hons) Economics, Politics and International Studies, the modules marked below in the table as ‘Required Core Modules’ must be passed (with a mark of at least 40%) in order to proceed to the second year. In addition, you must achieve a CATS weighted average of at least 40% across all modules. Find out more about First Year Boards of Examiners’ Conventions.

First-year students on this degree course must also take the compulsory Personal Development Module, which is non-credit bearing.

Code Required Core Modules CATS
EC107 Economics 1 30
EC120 Quantitative Techniques 30
PO107 Introduction to Politics 30
PO131 World Politics 30
Code Optional Modules (up to three modules, jointly worth between 36 and 45 CATS) CATS Credits
EC104 The World Economy: History and Theory 30
EC119 Mathematical Analysis 15
EC132 The Industrial Economy: Strategy 15
EC133 Linear Algebra 15
EC134 Topics in Applied Economics 1a 15
EC135 Topics in Applied Economics 1b 15
EC138 Introduction to Environmental Economics 15
PO102 Political Research in the 21st Century 30
PO132 Contemporary Themes in Comparative Politics 15
PO133 Foundations of Political Economy 15
PO134 Justice, Democracy and Citizenship 15
PO135 Nine Ideas in International Security 15
  An approved language module 24/30
  Any other module on the List of Approved Modules for First-Year Students Minimum of 24 (or 2 x 12)

NB: we cannot guarantee that all optional modules listed in this handbook will be available each year or that the same lecturers will continue to deliver the modules.

The list of approved modules for first-year students on the Department's undergraduate webpages is not exhaustive. If outside options not on the list appeal to you, please ensure that you complete an online Unusual Options Request Form and obtain permission from the department offering the module. Whether or not the outside option is approved, you must ensure that you register correctly for the module, following that department’s procedure, but also registering on the eVision Module Registration (eMR) system. You should go to the UG Office if you have concerns about the modules you are registered to take. Note that normally you are permitted to take only 100-coded modules in the first year, with the exception of languages. IB modules must be taken at 12 CATS.

First-year students in Economics are not permitted to take optional modules worth less than 12 CATS.

Second Year Course Structure

In the second year, you choose between an Economics major (leading to BSc) and a Politics and International Studies major (leading to BA). When entering the final year, there is then an option to choose a Bipartite pathway (leading to a BA). Candidates for Honours take modules totalling 120 CATS in their second year. Candidates may take a maximum of 30 CATS of optional modules from outside Economics and Politics in each of their second and final years.

Economics Major

You will take core modules worth 90 CATS and optional modules worth 30 CATS.

Code Core Modules CATS
EC204 Economics 2 30
Code Optional Core Modules in Economics (one from) CATS

EC203

EC226

Applied Econometrics or

Econometrics 1*

30

30

Code Optional Core Modules in PAIS (one from) CATS

PO201

PO203

PO219

PO230


PO231

Political Theory from Hobbes or

Politics of International Development or

Theories of International Relations or

States and Markets: An Introduction to International Political

Economy or

International Security

30

30

30

30


30

Code Optional Modules (totalling 30 CATS) CATS
  A Second Year module in Economics or Politics and International Studies 2 x 15 or 1 x 15
  Any other module on the List of Approved Modules for Second Year Students 30 or 2 x 15 or 1 x 15

NB: we cannot guarantee that all optional modules listed in this handbook will be available each year or that the same lecturers will continue to deliver the modules.

An asterisk (*) indicates that certain restrictions may apply to your choice of module.

The list of approved modules for second-year students on the Department’s undergraduate webpages is not exhaustive. If outside options not on the list appeal to you, please ensure that you complete an online Unusual Options Request Form and obtain permission from the department offering the module. Whether or not the outside option is approved, you must ensure that you register correctly for the module, following that department’s procedure, but also registering on the eVision Module Registration (eMR) system. You should go to the UG Office if you have concerns about the modules you are registered to take. Note that normally you are permitted to take only 200-coded modules in the second year. Note that final-year students are not permitted to take PO200-coded modules.

Second-year students are not normally permitted to take modules worth less than 15 CATS for credit. Some modules may have some restrictions.

Politics and International Studies Major

You will take core modules worth 90 CATS and optional modules worth 30 CATS.

Code Core Modules CATS
EC204 Economics 2 30
PO201 Political Theory from Hobbes 30
Code Optional Core Modules in PAIS (one from) CATS

PO203

PO219

PO230


PO231

Politics of International Development or

Theories of International Relations or

States and Markets: An Introduction to International Political

Economy or

International Security

30

30

30


30

Code Optional Modules (totalling 30 CATS) CATS
  A Second Year module in Economics or Politics and International Studies 30 or 2 x 15 or 1 x 15
  An approved language module 30
  Any approved module on the List of Approved Modules for Second -year Students 30 or 2 x 15 or 1 x 15

NB: we cannot guarantee that all optional modules listed in this Handbook will be available each year or that the same lecturers will continue to deliver the modules.

The lists of approved modules for final-year students on the Department's undergraduate webpages are not exhaustive. If outside options not on the list appeal to you, please ensure that you complete an Unusual Options Request Form and obtain permission from the department offering the module. Whether or not the outside option is approved, you must ensure that you register correctly for the module, following that department’s procedure, but also registering on the eVision Module Registration (eMR) system. You should go to the UG Office if you have concerns about the modules you are registered to take. Note that normally you are permitted to take only 200-coded modules in the second year. Note that final-year students are not permitted to take PO200-coded modules and will not be permitted to take EC200-coded modules from the 2019-2020 academic year.

Second-year students are not normally permitted to take modules worth less than 15 CATS for credit. Some modules may have some restrictions.

Final Year Course Structure

Final-year students may continue with the major chosen in year 2 or may opt to move to the Bipartite pathway (BA).

Economics Major (BSc)

Candidates for Honours take modules totalling 120 CATS, which comprises 30 CATS of core modules and 90 CATS of optional modules. If you are on the Economics major you must take a minimum of 90 CATS in EC-coded modules in your final year, including EC304 (30 CATS). This means that if you are on the Economics major you may only take 30 CATS of modules outside of the Department of Economics in your final year.

Within the 90 CATS of optional modules, two conditions must be met: i) at least 60 credits must be contributed by EC-coded modules and ii) at least 60 credits must be contributed by 300-coded modules. You may take a maximum of 30 CATS of optional modules from outside Economics and Politics in each of your Second and Final years.

Code Core Modules CATS
EC304 The Making of Economic Policy 30
Code Optional Modules (totalling 90 CATS) CATS
  A Final Year module in Economics AND 30 or 2 x 15
  a Second or Final Year module in Economics (see rule above) or 30 or 2 x 15
  a Final Year module in Politics and International Studies or 30
  an approved language module or 30
 

any other module on either the List of Approved Modules for second year students (except for PO200 coded modules), or the List of Approved Modules for Final-Year Students, subject to regulations

30 or 2 x 15 or 1 x 15

NB: we cannot guarantee that all optional modules listed in this Handbook will be available each year or that the same lecturers will continue to deliver the modules.

The Lists of Approved Modules for Second and Final Year Students is not exhaustive. If outside options not on the list appeal to you, please ensure that you complete an Unusual Options Request Form and obtain permission from the department offering the module. Whether or not the outside option is approved, you must ensure that you register correctly for the module, following that department’s procedure, but also registering on the eVision Module Registration (eMR) system. You should go to the UG Office if you have concerns about the modules you are registered to take. Note that normally you are permitted to take only 200-coded or 300-coded modules in the final year, with limited exceptions. Note that final-year students are not permitted to take PO200-coded modules and will not be permitted to take EC200-coded modules from the 2019-2020 academic year.

Final-year students are not normally permitted to take modules worth less than 15 CATS for credit.

Politics and International Studies Major (BA)

Candidates for Honours take core modules worth 30 CATS and optional modules worth 90 CATS. At least 30 CATS of the optional modules must be contributed by 300-coded modules. You may take a maximum of 30 CATS of optional modules from outside Economics and Politics in each of your second and final years.

Code Core Modules CATS
EC304 The Making of Economic Policy 30
Code Optional Core Modules (totalling 30 CATS) CATS
  Any PO300-coded modules 1 x 30
Code Optional Modules (totalling 60 CATS) CATS
  A Second or Final Year module in Economics (see rule above) 30 or 2 x 15 or 1 x 15
  A Final Year module in Politics and International Studies 30 or 2 x 15 or 1 x 15
  And either an approved language module 30
  Or any other module on either the List of Approved Modules for Second-Year Students (except for PO200 coded modules or from the 2019-2020 academic year, EC200-coded modules), or the List of Approved Modules for Final-Year Students, subject to regulations 30 or 2 x 15 or 1 x 15

NB: we cannot guarantee that all optional modules listed in this Handbook will be available each year or that the same lecturers will continue to deliver the modules.

The lists of approved modules for second- and final-year students are not exhaustive. If outside options not on the list appeal to you, please ensure that you complete an online Unusual Options Request Form and obtain permission from the department offering the module. Whether or not the outside option is approved, you must ensure that you register correctly for the module, following that department’s procedure, but also registering on the eVision Module Registration (eMR) system. You should go to the UG Office if you have concerns about the modules you are registered to take. Note that normally you are permitted to take only 200-coded or 300-coded modules in the final year. Note that final-year students are not permitted to take PO200-coded modules and will not be permitted to take EC200-coded modules from the 2019-2020 academic year.

Final-year students are not normally permitted to take modules worth less than 15 CATS for credit. Some modules may have restrictions.

Bipartite Pathway (BA)

Candidates for Honours take modules totalling 120 CATS, which comprises 30 CATS of core modules and 90 CATS of optional modules. Within the 90 CATS of optional modules, two conditions must be met: (i) at least 60 CATS must be contributed by EC-coded or PO-coded modules* and (ii) at least 60 CATS must be contributed by 300-coded modules. You may take a maximum of 30 CATS of optional modules from outside Economics and Politics in each of your second and final years, e.g. language modules.

Code Core Modules CATS
EC304 The Making of Economic Policy 30
Code Optional Modules (totalling 90 CATS) CATS
  Second or Final Year modules in Economics or Final Year modules in Politics and International Studies* Min 60 CATS
 

Or any other module, including languages, on the List of Approved Modules for final year students subject to regulations

Up to max 30 CATS

* Within this 60 CATS you must take at least ONE EC-coded (15 CAT) module and at least ONE PO-coded (15 CAT) module.

NB: we cannot guarantee that all optional modules listed in this Handbook will be available each year or that the same lecturers will continue to deliver the modules.

The lists of approved modules for second- and final-year students are not exhaustive. If outside options not on the list appeal to you, please ensure that you complete an online Unusual Options Request Form and obtain permission from the department offering the module. Whether or not the outside option is approved, you must ensure that you register correctly for the module, following that department’s procedure, but also registering on the eVision Module Registration (eMR) system. You should go to the UG Office if you have concerns about the modules you are registered to take. Note that normally you are permitted to take only 200-coded or 300-coded modules in the final year. Note that Final Year students are not permitted to take PO200-coded modules and will not be permitted to take EC200-coded modules from the 2019-2020 academic year. .

Final Year students are not normally permitted to take modules worth less than 15 CATS for credit. Some modules may have restrictions.

BSc Mathematics and Economics (GL11) Regulations

Course co-ordinator: Dr Jonathan Cave

Please note that this Degree course is no longer accepting students via UCAS. Students are able to transfer onto the Degree.

The Examination Scheme for Mathematics and Economics:

  • The first, second, and final years of study contribute to final degree credit in the ratio 10:40:50
  • All modules are examined in the year in which they are taught in accordance with the patterns of assessment set out in the appropriate departmental list.
  • Final-year modules provided by the Warwick Mathematics Institute that are taught in the autumn term are examined in April, as are MA242 Algebra I and MA244 Analysis III. The remaining modules are examined in the summer examination period.

First Year Course Structure

The first year is in common with the Mathematics degree (UCAS no. G100), except that EC107 Economics 1 and ST112 Probability B are also core modules.

You may take an overload (maximum 150 CATS). You may choose to take EC108 Macroeconomics 1 and EC109 Microeconomics 1 as an alternative to EC107 Economics 1. You are not permitted to take EC106 Introduction to Quantitative Economics. You are permitted to take outside options and whether or not the outside option is approved, you must ensure that you register correctly for the module, following that department’s procedure, but also registering on the eVision Module Registration (eMR) system.

What is required to pass your first year and progress to the second year?

Your first year counts 10% towards your final Degree Classification. The decision whether you have passed your first year and may be permitted to proceed to the second year is made by a Faculty First Year Board of Examiners which sits in June and September each year. It is run by the Faculty of Science. You will need to pass the Required Core modules (with a mark of at least 40%) in order to proceed to the second year. Details can be found on the Mathematics Department webpages. In addition, you must achieve a CATS weighted average of at least 40% across all modules. Find out more about First Year Boards of Examiners’ Conventions.

Transfers to the L100 Economics degree course at the end of the first year

At the end of the first year, you may apply to transfer degree course from Mathematics and Economics (GL11) to Economics (L100). Such transfers are approved only in exceptional circumstances, and you should contact Dr Jonathan Cave for further information. If you transfer from Mathematics and Economics to Economics at the end of your first year you will undertake the Economics syllabus detailed in the BSc Economics (L100) regulations section of the handbook. You will graduate with a BSc in Economics, not a BSc in Mathematics and Economics.

Second Year Course Structure
The normal load is 120 CATS. The maximum load is 150 CATS. Candidates for Honours take six core modules and choose optional modules including modules totalling 12 CATS from List A (this is the listing of sufficiently relevant and rigorous modules used by the Warwick Mathematics Institute and can be found on the webpage.) In the second year you will take 48 CATS of Mathematics core modules, 60 CATS of Economics core modules and between 12 and 72 CATS of optional modules, as shown in the table below.

During this year you will retain your Warwick Mathematics Institute Personal Tutor and are administratively part of the Mathematics Department. At the end of the year, you move to the Department of Economics for administrative and personal tutor purposes. The second-year exam board is run by the Department of Economics.

Code Core Modules CATS
EC204 Economics 2 30
MA222 Metric Spaces 12
MA251 Algebra I 12
MA244 Analysis III 12
MA225 Differentiation 12
Code Optional Core Modules CATS
EC226
or
EC220/21
Econometrics 1*

Mathematical Economics 1a and 1b*
30

30
Code Optional Modules CATS
List A As List A for the Second Year of G100 Mathematics. Students taking EC226 as an optional core module should consider as recommended options, ST202 Stochastic Processes, and/or ST213 Mathematics of Random Events. Students taking EC220/21 as an optional core module should consider as a recommended option, MA209 Variational Principles  
List B As List B for the Second Year of G100 Mathematics
Please see the Mathematics website for more details.
 

*You are strongly encouraged to take EC226 Econometrics 1, as opposed to EC220/EC221 Mathematical Economics to ensure you are sufficiently prepared for your core year 3 module EC331 Research in Applied Economics.

Final Year Course Structure

For the final year of your studies, you will transit from the Warwick Mathematics Institute to the Department of Economics for the purposes of administration and personal tutoring. Candidates for Honours take one core module worth 30 CATS and optional modules worth 90 CATS (of which at least 60 CATS must be 300 coded and at least 60 CATS must be EC, MA or ST coded).

Code Core Module CATS
EC331 Research in Applied Economics

30

Optional modules for the final year include most EC200 (second year) and EC300 (final year) modules; (including EC226 Econometrics 1 but excluding EC203 Applied Econometrics) and MA200 and MA300 modules.

You are permitted to take outside options and whether or not the outside option is approved, you must ensure that you register correctly for the module, following that department’s procedure, but also registering on the eVision Module Registration (eMR) system.

Final-year GL11 students are not permitted to take any 100-coded modules.

YOU ARE NOT PERMITTED TO TAKE MORE THAN 120 CATS IN THE FINAL YEAR.

Changing your Degree Course

Almost all students complete the degree course on which they were first registered. However, a few find that they wish to change degree course. You should not be surprised to feel some occasional doubts about whether or not you are following the right degree course. They are as common and normal as wondering if you are in the right job or personal relationship. It is usually a bad idea to act on such doubts in a rush. You may need time to discover what your course is really like.

If you have persistent doubts about whether you are on the right degree course you should first consult with your Personal Tutor or Year Tutor or go along to the Academic and Pastoral Support daily drop-in sessions. If you decide that you wish to change to another degree course you should complete the degree course transfer form. This form should be returned by the end of week 2 of Term 1 to the Undergraduate (UG) Office and decisions will be made by the end of Week 3. After this deadline, the only other time when a transfer will be considered is after the end of the first year, when all exam results are available. All decisions will depend upon the exact change proposed.

Transfers involving other departments are never automatic. All transfers to degree courses outside Economics require the specific agreement of the department to which you wish to transfer. No student from outside of the Department of Economics will be able to transfer directly into the second year of any or our Degree courses. Within the Department of Economics, it is sometimes possible to transfer from one of the degree courses to another. More details on this are given in the table below.

Please be aware that:

  • requests are sometimes refused
  • approval of transfers at the end of the first year will always be subject to confirmation in the light of your examination results
  • you cannot transfer onto the Mathematics and Economics degree course from any degree course other than Mathematics
  • if your application to transfer course is successful, your timetable will probably be disrupted.

Internal transfers

This section refers to transfers between degree courses in which the Department of Economics is either the home Department or is involved as a joint degree partner Department.

Which of these transfers are possible?

  • note that all transfers depend on availability of places.
  • early transfers from Economics to Economics & Industrial Organisation (and vice versa) are straightforward. We do not impose any special conditions other than ensuring that you have thought about the consequences and are willing to take responsibility for the impact. Requests are normally refused only if they are so late that we believe you are more likely to struggle in your new course than in your old one.
  • transfers out of Economics, Economics & Industrial Organisation and EPAIS altogether into courses administered by other departments are possible only with the specific agreement of the department to which you wish to transfer. If you obtain that agreement we will not normally refuse a request to transfer.

The grid below shows the criteria required for transfers into our various degree courses at the end of the first year.

To:

From:
Economics Economics &
Industrial Organisation
Economics, Politics &
International Studies
Philosophy, Politics &
Economics
Mathematics & Economics or MORSE Economic Studies and Global Sustainable Development Modern Languages and Economics
Economics   A C C E C C
Economics &
Industrial Organisation
A   C C E C C
Economics, Politics &
International Studies
B, C, D B, C, D   C E C C
Philosophy, Politics &
Economics
B, C, D B, C, D C   E G G
Mathematics & Economics or MORSE B, C E E E   E E
Economic Studies and Global Sustainable Development
B, C, F B, C, F B, C, F G E
G
Modern Languages and Economics
B, C, D B, C, D B, C, D G E G

Key:

A
This will be approved subject to you passing your first year at the first or second attempt (this is the same condition as for you to proceed to the second year of your existing degree course).

B This will be approved subject to three conditions (1) you must pass your first year at the first or second attempt, (2) you must obtain a mark of at least 65% in EC107 Economics 1 or EC106 Quantitative Economics at the first attempt and (3) you must agree to carry out recommended reading in macroeconomics and microeconomics over the summer vacation between your first and second years (please obtain reading lists from the module leaders for EC108 Macroeconomics 1 and EC109 Microeconomics 1). You may be referred to the Joint Degrees Officer who may indicate reading that is required.

C This will be approved only with the agreement of the relevant Department (Warwick Mathematics Institute for Mathematics and Economics; Department of Statistics for MORSE; Department of Politics and International Studies for EPAIS; Departments of Philosophy and Politics and International Studies for PPE; Department of Cross Faculty Studies for Economic Studies and Global Sustainable Development; School of Modern Languages for Modern Languages and Economics and all variations). You must obtain the relevant Department's permission and meet any special conditions imposed by them, including subject requirements; you must also pass your first year at the first or second attempt.

D If you are taking EC123 and EC124, this will be approved subject to passing EC120 overall. If you are taking EC121 and EC122, you are required to pass EC121 and EC122 with a mark in each of at least 65% at the first attempt.

E This will not normally be permitted.

F You must have taken Route B (EC120), including Mathematical Techniques (EC121/EC123), Statistical Techniques (EC122/EC124) and Computing and Data Analysis (EC125). If you are taking EC123 and EC124, this will be approved subject to passing EC120 overall. If you are taking EC121 and EC122, you are required to pass EC121 and EC122 with a mark in each of at least 65% at the first attempt.

G You must consult the relevant Departments, as these Degrees are not housed within the Department of Economics.

NB: You must normally have met the minimum entry standards for the degree course to which you wish to transfer or you may be asked to meet additional requirements as set by the Director of Undergraduate Studies or the Admissions Tutor.

External transfer

  • If you wish to transfer to L100, L116 (L112) or LM1D (LLD2) during the first two weeks of your first year you must complete a transfer request form. This will be considered by the Director of Undergraduates Studies. Please note that places are very limited and competitive and the Department rarely accepts transfers. Meeting the entry criteria does not guarantee you a place.
  • Transfers from other departments into the second year on any of the Department of Economics Degree courses are not permitted.

Withdrawal from your course

Voluntary Year Out

You are permitted to make an application to take a voluntary year out away from your studies in order to gain work experience (as set out in University Regulation 36.1.10). Please refer to this link to follow the process of taking a voluntary year out.

Temporary Withdrawal

A temporary withdrawal (TWD) is an approved period of time when you are not studying for your award and is governed by University Regulation 36.1. For more information, also see the guidance from the Academic Office.

You may request periods of temporary withdrawal for a variety of reasons and can find further details about this on the temporary withdrawal webpage. The last date of attendance on any temporary withdrawal request cannot be after the end of term 2. Any request to temporarily withdraw after this point will instead be considered by the Exam Board who will make a decision regarding sits or resits in examinations.

You may request, in the first instance, a maximum of 12 months of temporary withdrawal from your course of study. Periods of temporary withdrawal for less than 12 months are not permitted. In order to make a temporary withdrawal request, you should first talk with your Personal Tutor or Year Tutor and can discuss this in the Academic and Pastoral Support daily drop-in sessions. You must then complete an online Temporary Withdrawal Request Form, which should be submitted along with the relevant medical or other evidence. The Director of Undergraduate Studies will recommend that the request be approved or declined and if it is recommended for approval, the request will be sent to the Academic Registrar for final approval or decline. Please note that if you are requesting temporary withdrawal on medical or health-related grounds you must supply a recent medical note in support of your request.

Note that requests for retrospective temporary withdrawal, typically so that you effectively restart the academic year when you return, will be considered only in exceptional circumstances. Such requests must include a clear rationale outlining why you were unable to make the request earlier. Retrospective temporary withdrawal can only be backdated by a maximum of four weeks for Tier 4 visa holders. If you are a Tier 4 Visa holder you should go to the Office for Global Engagement (http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ofge ) to seek advice from an Immigration Adviser as a temporary withdrawal will affect your visa.

You should speak to Student Finance and Accommodation to notify them of your temporary withdrawal once it has been confirmed.

During a period of temporary withdrawal or resit without residence, you are not permitted to attend lectures or module Support and Feedback classes, either formally or informally. However, in order to help you prepare for your return to study or sitting examinations, access to University IT facilities and the Library will normally continue during these periods.

Returning after a period of temporary withdrawal

If you are returning part-way through an academic year, e.g. at the start of the spring or summer term, you will be assessed on the basis of the syllabus you have personally followed during your period of residence or study at Warwick. If the syllabus of a module has changed during your absence, then you will be set a special examination paper which covers the material you have followed.

Restarts

If you are a first year student, you may be permitted to restart your course if your first attempt had been affected by issues beyond your control (e.g. if medical problems or personal factors negatively affected your capacity to study). If you wish to restart, you should complete the restart request form. You will not normally be permitted to restart a course once you have taken your summer examinations. Under certain circumstances you may also be permitted to restart University the following year on a different course, should you find that your first choice was not the right one for you. If the restart is for a course in another department, you must get approval from the receiving department and should speak to that Department's Director of Undergraduate Studies.

If you are allowed to restart you will be treated as a new student when you return. For more information on restarting your course, please contact the Undergraduate Teaching & Learning Manager. Please note that there is no guarantee that a request to restart on a Degree course housed by the Department of Economics will be approved. We accept very few restart requests, due to capacity constraints. Restarts will only be considered at the start of the academic year or in the first 4 weeks of term 2.

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/studentrecords/students/restarts/ 

Permanent withdrawal

If you feel that you would like to permanently withdraw from your course, whether after a period of temporary withdrawal or not, please make an appointment to see your Personal Tutor or Year Tutor or go along to the Academic and Pastoral Support daily drop-in sessions. Here, you be able to discuss this important decision and receive advice on the implications. If, after this discussion, you are resolved to withdraw from your course, you must complete the Permanent Withdrawal Form. Please sign and send this form to the Director of Undergraduate Studies via the UG Office who will then arrange to inform the Academic Office of your departure. Please note that you should seek advice from Student Finance on any implications for your fee payments and also from Warwick Accommodation. International Students should contact the Office for Global Engagement for details on visa implications.

Monitoring points

As a student, you have some responsibilities to the Department, just as we have responsibilities to you. We want to be sure that you are coping with your work and engaging with your course and so we ask that you meet ELEVEN Monitoring Points throughout each academic year. Meeting your monitoring points is crucial and the consequences of missing three or more of these monitoring points can be significant, as detailed in the next section (2.6.1). Different degree courses and years of study have differing monitoring points, detailed below:

L100 - Year 1, L116 - Year 1
Autumn term
Monitoring Point Description How to meet this point Timing
1. Attendance at Department registration meeting Scan your card at meeting Week 0-1
2. Meeting with Personal Tutor Personal tutor and student to note the meeting on Tabula Between weeks 1 and 5
3. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC108 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 4
4. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC123

Tutor to note attendance on Tabula

Week 6
5. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC109 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 8
6. Submission of Economics module evaluation Via an online link to module evaluation Week 10
Spring Term
7. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC108 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 17
8. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC109 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 19
9. Attendance at test for EC124 Your Tabula mark constitutes attendance Week 21
10. Submission of Economics module evaluation Via an online link to module evaluation Week 24
Summer Term
11. Attendance at an examination Your exam script constitutes attendance Between weeks 35-37
L100 - Year 2, L116 (L112) - Year 2
Autumn term
Monitoring Point Description How to meet this point Timing
1. Attendance at Departmental Welcome Back meeting Scan your card at the meeting Week 1
2. Meeting with Personal Tutor Personal tutor and student to note the meeting on Tabula Between Weeks 1-5
3. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC202 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 5
4. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC226 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 7
5. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC202 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 9
6. Submission of Economics module evaluation Complete module evaluation via the online link sent to you Week 10
Spring Term
7. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC202 Upload your assessment via e-submission Week 16
8. Submission of assessment 1 for EC226 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 19
9. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC201 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 21
10. Submission of Economics module evaluation Complete module evaluation via the online link sent to you Week 24
Summer Term
11. Attendance at an examination Your exam script constitutes attendance Between weeks 35-38

L100 - Year 3, L103 - Year 4, L116(L112) - Year 3, L117 - Year 4, LV13 - Year 3, GL11 - Year 3, GL12 Year 4
Autumn term
Monitoring Point Description How to meet this point Timing
1. Attendance at Departmental Welcome Back meeting Scan your card at the meeting Week 1
2. Meeting with Personal Tutor Personal Tutor and student to note the meeting on Tabula Between Weeks 1-5
3. Attendance at EC331 module support and feedback class EC331 tutor notes attendance on Tabula Either Week 5 or 6
4. Attendance at EC331 module support and feedback class EC331 tutor notes attendance on Tabula Either Week 7 or 8
5. Submission of assessment 1 (Literature Review) for EC331 Submit your EC331 assessment via e-submission Week 10
6. Submission of Economics module evaluation Complete module evaluation via the online link sent to you Week 10
Spring Term
7. Attendance at EC331 module support and feedback class EC331 tutor notes attendance on Tabula Either Week 15 or 16
8. Attendance at EC331 module support and feedback class EC331 tutor notes attendance in Tabula Either Week 18 or 19
9. Attendance at EC331 module support and feedback class EC331 tutor notes attendance in Tabula Either Week 21 or 22
10. Submission of Economics module evaluation Complete module evaluation via the online link sent to you Week 24
Summer Term
11. Attendance at an examination Your exam script constitutes attendance Between weeks 34-36

LM1D (LLD2) – Year 1
Autumn term
Monitoring Point Description How to meet this point Timing
1. Attendance at Department registration meeting Scan your card at the meeting Week 0-1
2. Meeting with Personal Tutor Personal tutor and student to note the meeting on Tabula Between weeks 1 and 5
3. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC107 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 3
4. Attendance at test for either EC121 or EC123 Your Tabula mark constitutes attendance Week 4-6
5. Attendance at module support and feedback class for PO131 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 8
6. Submission of Economics module evaluation Complete module evaluation via the online link sent to you Week 10
Spring Term
7. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC107 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 17
8. Attendance at test for either EC122 or EC124 Your Tabula mark constitutes attendance Week 20 or 21
9. Attendance at module support and feedback class for PO107 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 23
10. Submission of Economics module evaluation Complete module evaluation via the online link sent to you Week 24
Summer Term
11. Attendance at an examination Your exam script constitutes attendance Between weeks 35-37


LM1D – Year 2
Autumn term
Monitoring Point Description How to meet this point Timing
1. Attendance at Departmental Welcome Back meeting Scan your card at the meeting Week 1
2. Meeting with Personal Tutor Personal tutor and student to note the meeting on Tabula Between weeks 1 and 5
3. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC204 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 3
4. Attendance at module support and feedback class for PO201, PO203, PO219, PO230 or PO231 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 5
5. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC204 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 8
6. Submission of Economics module evaluation Complete module evaluation via the online link sent to you Week 10
Spring Term
7. Submission of assessment 1 for EC204 Submit your EC204 assessment via e-submission Week 15
8. Attendance at module support and feedback class for PO201, PO203, PO219, PO230 or PO231 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 19
9. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC204 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 22
10. Submission of Economics module evaluation Complete module evaluation via the online link sent to you Week 24
Summer Term
11. Attendance at an examination Your exam script constitutes attendance Between weeks 36-38

LM1D (LLD2) – Year 3, LM1H Year 4
Autumn term
Monitoring Point Description How to meet this point Timing
1. Attendance at Departmental Welcome Back meeting Scan your card at the meeting Week 1
2. Meeting with Personal Tutor Personal tutor and student to note the meeting on Tabula Between Weeks 1 and 5
3. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC304 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 5
4. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC304 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 7
5. Module support and feedback class presentation for EC304 Give your presentation: marks recorded in Tabula constitute attendance Between weeks 3 and 10
6. Submission of Economics module evaluation Complete module evaluation via the online link sent to you Week 10
Spring Term
7. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC304 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 17
8. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC304 Tutor to note attendance on Tabula Week 19
9. Attendance at module support and feedback class for EC304 Give your presentation: marks recorded in Tabula constitute attendance Week 23
10. Submission of Economics module evaluation Complete module evaluation via the online link sent to you Week 24
Summer Term
11. Attendance at an examination   Between weeks 36-38

Meeting your monitoring points and what happens if you miss them

As you progress through the academic year you will be able to see on your Tabula page how many monitoring points you have successfully met and how many you have missed. We ask that you meet the monitoring points as listed above. Please keep this tally in mind and inform the Undergraduate Office (economics.ugoffice@warwick.ac.uk) should you believe a mistake has been made in your monitoring points record on Tabula. You will also be prompted by the Undergraduate Office to check the accuracy of your monitoring points record at various points in the year.

Please be aware that you will be contacted should we become concerned about your missed monitoring points.

After three monitoring points are missed we will contact you to investigate whether you are having any problems that are preventing you from fully engaging with your course. After four monitoring points are missed we may refer you to the relevant professional within the University welfare system who could help you, such as the Dean of Students or Student Support Services as appropriate. After five monitoring points are missed you will be contacted to make you aware that you are at serious risk of being recommended for termination of your registration at the University.

After six monitoring points are missed the Department is likely to invoke Regulation 36 to begin termination of registration proceedings and your case will be handed over to the Academic Office.

Tier 4 visa students should be particularly aware of the consequences of missing monitoring points: the Academic Office is obliged to report to the UK Borders Agency of the Home Office if any students have been found not to be engaging with and attending their degree course. This has serious implications for your visa status.

Monitoring module Support and Feedback class absences

You are required to attend all of your allocated module Support and Feedback classes. You can see which groups you have been allocated to by logging into Tabula. In order to keep module Support and Feedback class sizes stable, you are not permitted to swap your group unless you have the prior express permission of the UG Office and you have a compelling reason, like a timetable clash. If you attend a different group from the one to which you have been allocated, you will simply be marked as absent from your group. Your class tutors do not have the authority to give you permission to swap between groups.

At each module Support and Feedback meeting your tutor will record your attendance or absence and input this data into Tabula. This ensures we monitor your engagement with your course and attendance also forms part of your monitoring points. If you have been marked ‘absent’ you will see an ‘Absent’ flag appear on your Tabula page next to the module Support and Feedback class in question. It is then your responsibility to explain your absence, providing evidence as to why you could not attend. For short-lived illnesses, you should provide a self-certification form as evidence, which you can obtain from the Health Centre reception (http://www.uwhc.org.uk/Important-Info/Sick-Notes-and-Medical-Certificates ). You should submit this via the Department's mitigating circumstances form on the Current Students section of the website within 3 days and can submit a maximum of 2 per academic year. Please note that the Department will monitor the number and frequency of episodes of self-certified illness. The Undergraduate Teaching & Learning Manager will decide whether or not your reason is valid and either condone or uphold your absence accordingly. If you believe an error has been made, you should contact the UG Office immediately.

If you are taking a module in another department, you should familiarise yourself with that particular department’s procedures regarding module class/seminar absences. However, you should note that it is still the Department of Economics (your home department) who will either condone or uphold your absence accordingly.